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  1.  12
    Achieving Crpd Compliance: Is the Mental Capacity Act of England and Wales Compatible with the Un Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability? If Not, What Next?Wayne Martin, Sabine Michalowski, Timo Jütten & Matthew Burch - manuscript
    In 2014 the Essex Autonomy Project undertook a six month project, funded by the AHRC, to provide technical advice to the UK Ministry of Justice on the question of whether the Mental Capacity Act is compliant with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Over the course of the project, the EAP research team organised a series of public policy roundtables, hosted by the Ministry of Justice, and which brought together leading experts to discuss and debate (...)
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  2.  10
    Achieving Crpd Compliance: Is the Mental Capacity Act of England and Wales Compatible with the Un Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability? If Not, What Next?Wayne Martin, Sabine Michalowski, Timo Jütten & Matthew Burch - manuscript
    In 2014 the Essex Autonomy Project undertook a six month project, funded by the AHRC, to provide technical advice to the UK Ministry of Justice on the question of whether the Mental Capacity Act is compliant with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Over the course of the project, the EAP research team organised a series of public policy roundtables, hosted by the Ministry of Justice, and which brought together leading experts to discuss and debate (...)
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  3.  52
    Substitute Decision Making in Medicine: Comparative Analysis of the Ethico-Legal Discourse in England and Germany. [REVIEW]Ralf J. Jox, Sabine Michalowski, Jorn Lorenz & Jan Schildmann - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):153-163.
    Health care decision making for patients without decisional capacity is ethically and legally challenging. Advance directives (living wills) have proved to be of limited usefulness in clinical practice. Therefore, academic attention should focus more on substitute decision making by the next of kin. In this article, we comparatively analyse the legal approaches to substitute medical decision making in England and Germany. Based on the current ethico-legal discourse in both countries, three aspects of substitute decision making will be highlighted: (1) Should (...)
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  4.  1
    Achieving Crpd Compliance: Is the Mental Capacity Act of England and Wales Compatible with the Un Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability? If Not, What Next?Wayne Martin, Sabine Michalowski, Timo Jütten & Matthew Burch - 2014 - Essex Autonomy Project, University of Essex.
    In 2014 the Essex Autonomy Project undertook a six month project, funded by the AHRC, to provide technical advice to the UK Ministry of Justice on the question of whether the Mental Capacity Act is compliant with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Over the course of the project, the EAP research team organised a series of public policy roundtables, hosted by the Ministry of Justice, and which brought together leading experts to discuss and debate (...)
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  5.  6
    Human Rights and COVID-19 Triage: A Comment on the Bath Protocol.Vivek Bhatt, Sabine Michalowski, Aaron Wyllie, Margot Kuylen & Wayne Martin - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (7):464-466.
    In their discussion paper of November 2020, Cook et al present a draft protocol for navigating circumstances in which emergency services are overwhelmed. Their paper suggests that COVID-related triage decisions should be based on clinical assessment, patient and family consultation, and a range of ethical considerations. In this response, we note that the protocol exhibits an ambiguity that is likely to result in irresolvable dilemmas when put into practice. This ambiguity is exemplified in the paper’s prime ethical imperative, which takes (...)
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  6.  42
    Trial and Error at the End of Life—No Harm Done?Sabine Michalowski - 2007 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (2):257-280.
    English law gives the competent patient the right to refuse life-saving medical treatment, either contemporaneously or in an advance directive, and a physician commits a battery when treating a patient who validly refused treatment. However, with regard to the details of a physician's liability, many questions remain unanswered, and it is not at all clear under what circumstances a patient's tort action for unwanted life-saving treatment will succeed, and what remedies would be available to the patient. The article suggests that (...)
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