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  1.  84
    The Ethics of Medical AI and the Physician-Patient Relationship.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):115-121.
    :This article considers recent ethical topics relating to medical AI. After a general discussion of recent medical AI innovations, and a more analytic look at related ethical issues such as data privacy, physician dependency on poorly understood AI helpware, bias in data used to create algorithms post-GDPR, and changes to the patient–physician relationship, the article examines the issue of so-called robot doctors. Whereas the so-called democratization of healthcare due to health wearables and increased access to medical information might suggest a (...)
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  2.  70
    Responsible, Inclusive Innovation and the Nano-Divide.Doris Schroeder, Sally Dalton-Brown, Benjamin Schrempf & David Kaplan - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):177-188.
    Policy makers from around the world are trying to emulate successful innovation systems in order to support economic growth. At the same time, innovation governance systems are being put in place to ensure a better integration of stakeholder views into the research and development process. In Europe, one of the most prominent and newly emerging governance frameworks is called Responsible Research and Innovation. This article aims to substantiate the following points: The concept of RRI and the concept of justice can (...)
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  3.  12
    Trusting the Government to Do the Right Thing: Data Ethics in Australia’s Pandemic Response.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):222-230.
    After a brief overview of ethical issues in an Australian context catalyzed by the current pandemic, this article focuses on data protection in the light of recent debates about COVID-19 data tracking in Australia and globally. This article looks at the issue of trust as a fundamental principle of effective and ethical COVID-safe measures undertaken by the government. Key to ensuring such trust are Habermasian participatory dialogs, which assume trust as a condition of authentic illocution, and an emphasis on short-term (...)
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  4.  14
    Damaging the Future: The Health Rights of Children and the Issue of Short-Termism; Issues Facing Australian Bioethicists.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (3):440-446.
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  5.  6
    Healthcare in Australia.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):414-420.
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  6.  16
    Personalising the dilemma: research ethics in fiction.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2021 - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics 18 (2):114-125.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 114-125, April 2022. Learning about research ethics and research integrity is greatly facilitated by case studies, which illuminate, ground and personalise abstract questions. This paper argues that fiction can provide similar learning experiences, incarnating ethical dilemmas through a medium that is highly accessible yet sophisticated in its depictions of how researchers behave. Examples of fictional illustrations are given to illustrate various themes such as animal experimentation, exploitation of the vulnerable, researcher bias and research (...)
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    Personalising the dilemma: research ethics in fiction.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):114-125.
    Learning about research ethics and research integrity is greatly facilitated by case studies, which illuminate, ground and personalise abstract questions. This paper argues that fiction can provide similar learning experiences, incarnating ethical dilemmas through a medium that is highly accessible yet sophisticated in its depictions of how researchers behave. Examples of fictional illustrations are given to illustrate various themes such as animal experimentation, exploitation of the vulnerable, researcher bias and research fraud.
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  8. Global Ethics and Nanotechnology: A Comparison of the Nanoethics Environments of the EU and China. [REVIEW]Sally Dalton-Brown - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (2):137-150.
    The following article offers a brief overview of current nanotechnology policy, regulation and ethics in Europe and The People’s Republic of China with the intent of noting (dis)similarities in approach, before focusing on the involvement of the public in science and technology policy (i.e. participatory Technology Assessment). The conclusions of this article are, that (a) in terms of nanosafety as expressed through policy and regulation, China PR and the EU have similar approaches towards, and concerns about, nanotoxicity—the official debate on (...)
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