30 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Sam Wilkinson [30]Sam Luis John Wilkinson [1]
See also
Sam Wilkinson
University of Exeter
  1.  20
    Getting Warmer: Predictive Processing and the Nature of Emotion.Sam Wilkinson, George Deane, Kathryn Nave & Andy Clark - 2019 - In Laura Candiotto (ed.), The Value of Emotions for Knowledge. Springer Verlag. pp. 101-119.
    Predictive processing accounts of neural function view the brain as a kind of prediction machine that forms models of its environment in order to anticipate the upcoming stream of sensory stimulation. These models are then continuously updated in light of incoming error signals. Predictive processing has offered a powerful new perspective on cognition, action, and perception. In this chapter we apply the insights from predictive processing to the study of emotions. The upshot is a picture of emotion as inseparable from (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  27
    The Representation of Agents in Auditory Verbal Hallucinations.Sam Wilkinson & Vaughan Bell - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (1):104-126.
    Current models of auditory verbal hallucinations tend to focus on the mechanisms underlying their occurrence, but often fail to address the content of the auditory experience. In other words, they tend to ask why there are AVHs at all, instead of asking why, given that there are AVHs, they have the properties that they have. One such property, which has been largely overlooked and which we will focus on here, is why the voices are often experienced as coming from agents, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  3.  23
    The Varieties of Inner Speech Questionnaire – Revised : Replicating and Refining Links Between Inner Speech and Psychopathology.Ben Alderson-Day, Kaja Mitrenga, Sam Wilkinson, Simon McCarthy-Jones & Charles Fernyhough - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 65:48-58.
  4.  93
    Accounting for the Phenomenology and Varieties of Auditory Verbal Hallucination Within a Predictive Processing Framework.Sam Wilkinson - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 30:142-155.
    Two challenges that face popular self-monitoring theories (SMTs) of auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) are that they cannot account for the auditory phenomenology of AVHs and that they cannot account for their variety. In this paper I show that both challenges can be met by adopting a predictive processing framework (PPF), and by viewing AVHs as arising from abnormalities in predictive processing. I show how, within the PPF, both the auditory phenomenology of AVHs, and three subtypes of AVH, can be accounted (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5.  29
    Expressivism About Delusion Attribution.Sam Wilkinson - 2020 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 16 (2):59-77.
    In this paper, I will present and advocate a view about what we are doing when we attribute delusion, namely, say that someone is delusional. It is an “expressivist” view, roughly analogous to expressivism in meta-ethics. Just as meta-ethical expressivism accounts for certain key features of moral discourse, so does this expressivism account for certain key features of delusion attribution. And just as meta-ethical expressivism undermines factualism about moral properties, so does this expressivism, if correct, show that certain attempts to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  51
    Delusions, Dreams, and the Nature of Identification.Sam Wilkinson - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):203-226.
    Delusional misidentification is commonly understood as the product of an inference on the basis of evidence present in the subject's experience. For example, in the Capgras delusion, the patient sees someone who looks like a loved one, but who feels unfamiliar, so they infer that they must not be the loved one. I question this by presenting a distinction between “recognition” and “identification.” Identification does not always require recognition for its epistemic justification, nor does it need recognition for its psychological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7.  43
    How Anxiety Induces Verbal Hallucinations.Matthew Ratcliffe & Sam Wilkinson - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 39:48-58.
  8.  45
    Inner Speech is Not so Simple: A Commentary on Cho & Wu.Peter Moseley & Sam Wilkinson - unknown
    We welcome Cho and Wu’s suggestion that the study of auditory verbal hallucinations could be improved by contrasting and testing more explanatory models. However, we have some worries both about their criticisms of inner speech-based self-monitoring models and whether their proposed spontaneous activation model is explanatory.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. Beyond Believing Badly.Sam Wilkinson - 2013 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):105-119.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  30
    Voices and Thoughts in Psychosis: An Introduction.Sam Wilkinson & Ben Alderson-Day - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (3):529-540.
    In this introduction we present the orthodox account of auditory verbal hallucinations, a number of worries for this account, and some potential responses open to its proponents. With some problems still remaining, we then introduce the problems presented by the phenomenon of thought insertion, in particular the question of how different it is supposed to be from AVHs. We then mention two ways in which theorists have adopted different approaches to voices and thoughts in psychosis, and then present the motivation (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  32
    A Mental Files Approach to Delusional Misidentification.Sam Wilkinson - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (2):389-404.
    I suggest that we can think of delusional misidentification in terms of systematic errors in the management of mental files. I begin by sketching the orthodox “bottom-up” aetiology of delusional misidentification. I suggest that the orthodox aetiology can be given a descriptivist or a singularist interpretation. I present three cases that a descriptivist interpretation needs to account for. I then introduce a singularist approach, one that is based on mental files, and show how it opens the way for different and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  8
    The Speaker Behind the Voice: Therapeutic Practice From the Perspective of Pragmatic Theory.Felicity Deamer & Sam Wilkinson - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  13.  13
    Levels and Kinds of Explanation: Lessons From Neuropsychiatry.Sam Wilkinson - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  14.  4
    Forward Models and Passive Psychotic Symptoms.Sam Wilkinson - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  15. Introspection, Isolation, and Construction: Mentality as Activity. Commentary on Hurlburt, Heavey & Kelsey, “Toward a Phenomenology of Inner Speaking”.Joel Krueger, Marco Bernini & Sam Wilkinson - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 25:9-10.
  16.  16
    Losing Ourselves: Active Inference, Depersonalization, and Meditation.George Deane, Mark Miller & Sam Wilkinson - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  10
    A Commentary On: Affective Coding: The Emotional Dimension of Agency.David Smailes, Peter Moseley & Sam Wilkinson - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  18.  7
    Are There Auditory Objects in the Auditory Domain, Like Visual Objects in the Visual Domain?Sam Wilkinson - 2010 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 16 (1):9-11.
    : One can understand the word “object” as a concrete physical object or as that which is on the receiving end of a subject-object relation, namely, that entity which a particular cognitive state or process is “of.” These latter objects are determined by the way our sensory systems exploit the ways elements of the world impinge upon our bodily surfaces. Our visual system exploits light reflected off the surfaces of objects; therefore, the objects of our visual experiences can be physical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  72
    Consciousness Revisited: Materialism Without Phenomenal Concepts.Sam Wilkinson - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (5):717 - 721.
  20.  6
    Correction to: Distinguishing volumetric content from perceptual presence within a predictive processing framework.Sam Wilkinson - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):801-801.
    The original version of this article unfortunately has missing statement in the Acknowledgments section.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  16
    Distinguishing Volumetric Content From Perceptual Presence Within a Predictive Processing Framework.Sam Wilkinson - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):791-800.
    I argue for an overlooked distinction between perceptual presence and volumetric content, and flesh it out in terms of predictive processing. Within the predictive processing framework we can distinguish between agent-active and object-active expectations. The former expectations account for perceptual presence, while the latter account for volumetric content. I then support this position with reference to how experiences of presence are created by virtual reality technologies, and end by reflecting on what this means for the relationship between sensorimotor enactivism and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  63
    Egocentric and Encyclopedic Doxastic States in Delusions of Misidentification.Sam Wilkinson - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (2):219-234.
    A recent debate in the literature on delusions centers on the question of whether delusions are beliefs or not. In this paper, an overlooked distinction between egocentric and encyclopedic doxastic states is introduced and brought to bear on this debate, in particular with regard to delusions of misidentification. The result is that a more accurate characterization of the delusional subject’s doxastic point of view is made available. The patient has a genuine egocentric belief (“This man is not my father”), but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  18
    Hearing Soundless Voices.Sam Wilkinson - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (3):27-34.
    The phenomenon of 'hearing voices,' often viewed as a symptom of schizophrenia, is commonly called, in the scientific and clinical literature, 'auditory-verbal hallucination.' However, reports of hearing soundless voices, voices that are not auditory, which go as far back as Tuttle and Kraepelin and appear in phenomenological interviews and questionnaires are relatively common. What are we to make of such reports?One option is to dismiss these claims: one cannot hear soundless voices. This dismissal could be due to a combination of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  17
    If We Accept That Mary the Colour Scientist Gains New Knowledge When She Sees the Colour Red for the First Time Must This Lead Us to a Non-Physicalist Theory of Consciousness?Sam Wilkinson - 2010 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 16 (1):12-15.
    A common and popular option in defending Physicalism against the Knowledge Argument is the “phenomenal concept strategy” . PCS claims that, although ex hypothesi Mary knows all the propositions pertaining to color and experiences of color, there is at least space for the claim that she acquires a new concept, and thereby accesses these propositions under different, phenomenal modes of presentation. In short, Mary acquires new concepts upon her release and that explains her “discovery.” Here I will show there is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  56
    The Predictive Mind By Jakob Hohwy.Sam Wilkinson - 2015 - Analysis 75 (1):169-172.
  26. The Phenomenology of Voice-Hearing and Two Concepts of Voice.Sam Wilkinson & Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In Angela Woods, B. Alderson-Day & C. Fernyhough (eds.), Voices in Psychosis: Interdisciplinary Perspective.
    The experiences described in the VIP transcripts are incredibly varied and yet frequently explicitly labelled by participants as "voices." How can we make sense of this? If we reflect carefully on uses of the word "voice", we see that it can express at least two entirely different concepts, which pick out categorically different phenomena. One concept picks out a speech sound (e.g. "This synthesizer has a "voice" setting"). Another concept picks out a specific agent (e.g. "I hear two voices: one (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  99
    The Status of Delusion in the Light of Marcu's "Revisionary Proposals".Sam Wilkinson - 2013 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (3):421-436.
    La concepción de Marcus sobre las creencias se aplica al debate centrado en la cuestión: "¿Son creencias los delirios?" Dos consecuencias que se siguen de ello son: i) que la cuestión "¿Son creencias los delirios?" necesita reformularse, y ii) que la respuesta es: "No, algunos pacientes que sufren delirios no creen lo que, "prima facie", parecen creer".
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  17
    The Status of Delusion in the Light of Marcus’s Revisionary Proposals.Sam Wilkinson - 2013 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 28 (3):421-436.
    Marcus’s view of belief is applied to the debate that centers around the question, “Are delusions beliefs?” Two consequences of this are that, i) the question, “Are delusions beliefs?”, strictly speaking, needs rephrasing and ii) that, once the question is rephrased, the answer is “No”, many delusional patients do not believe what they _prima facie_ seem to believe.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. What Can Predictive Processing Tell Us About the Content of Perceptual Experience?Sam Wilkinson - 2021 - In Heather Logue & Louise Richardson (eds.), Purpose and Procedure in Philosophy of Perception. OUP. pp. 174-190.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  4
    What Gets Passed in “Chunk-and-Pass” Processing? A Predictive Processing Solution to the Now-or-Never Bottleneck.Sam Wilkinson - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark