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Sandra Harding [69]Sandra G. Harding [13]
  1. Objectivity and Diversity: Another Logic of Scientific Research.Sandra Harding - 2019 - University of Chicago Press.
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  2. [Book Review] the Science Question in Feminism. [REVIEW]Sandra G. Harding - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (1):561-574.
    This essay is a critical review of Sandra Harding's The Science Question in Feminism. Her text constitutes a monumental effort to capture an overview of recent feminist critique of science and to develop a feminist dialectical and materialist conception of the history of masculinist science. In this analysis of Harding's work, the organizing categories as well as the main assumptions of the text are reconstructed for closer examination within the context of modern feminist critique of science and feminist theory in (...)
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  3. Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking From Women's Lives.Sandra Harding - 1991 - Cornell University.
    Sandra Harding here develops further the themes first addressed in her widely influential book, The Science Question in Feminism, and conducts a compelling analysis of feminist theories on the philosophical problem of how we know what we ...
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  4. Whose Science? Whose Knowledge?Sandra Harding - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
     
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  5. Women and Moral Theory.Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding - 1989 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
     
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  6.  12
    Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking From Women's Lives.Susan Babbitt & Sandra Harding - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):287.
  7. The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies.Sandra G. Harding (ed.) - 2004 - Routledge.
    In the mid-1970s and early 1980s, several feminist theorists began developing alternatives to the traditional methods of scientific research. The result was a new theory, now recognized as Standpoint Theory, which caused heated debate and radically altered the way research is conducted. The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader is the first anthology to collect the most important essays on the subject as well as more recent works that bring the topic up-to-date. Leading feminist scholar and one of the founders of Standpoint (...)
     
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  8.  20
    Is Science Multi-Cultural? Postcolonialism, Feminism, and Epistemologies.Sandra Harding & N. Vassallo - 2001 - Epistemologia 24 (1):157-158.
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  9. Sciences From Below: Feminisms, Postcolonialities, and Modernities.Sandra Harding - 2008 - Duke University Press.
    In _Sciences from Below_, the esteemed feminist science studies scholar Sandra Harding synthesizes modernity studies with progressive tendencies in science and technology studies to suggest how scientific and technological pursuits might be more productively linked to social justice projects around the world. Harding illuminates the idea of multiple modernities as well as the major contributions of post-Kuhnian Western, feminist, and postcolonial science studies. She explains how these schools of thought can help those seeking to implement progressive social projects refine their (...)
     
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  10. What Can She Know? Feminist Theory and the Construction of Knowledge.Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding & Susan Hekman - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):202-210.
    Feminist epistemologists who attempt to refigure epistemology must wrestle with a number of dualisms. This essay examines the ways Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding, and Susan Hekman reconceptualize the relationship between self/other, nature/culture, and subject/object as they struggle to reformulate objectivity and knowledge.
     
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  11. The Science Question in Feminism.Sandra Harding - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (1):157-168.
    This essay is a critical review of Sandra Harding's The Science Question in Feminism. Her text constitutes a monumental effort to capture an overview of recent feminist critique of science and to develop a feminist dialectical and materialist conception of the history of masculinist science. In this analysis of Harding's work, the organizing categories as well as the main assumptions of the text are reconstructed for closer examination within the context of modern feminist critique of science and feminist theory in (...)
     
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  12. Introduction: Standpoint Theory as a Site of Political, Philosophic, and Scientific Debate.Sandra Harding - 2004 - In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge. pp. 1--15.
  13. Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science.Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) - 2003 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, and Marx; on (...)
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  14. Sex and Scientific Inquiry.Sandra G. Harding & Jean F. O'barr - 1987
     
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  15. Decentering the Center: Philosophy for a Multicultural, Postcolonial, and Feminist World.Uma Narayan & Sandra Harding (eds.) - 2000 - Indiana University Press.
    The essays in this volume bring to their focuses on philosophical issues the new angles of vision created by the multicultural, global, and postcolonial feminisms that have been developing around us.
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  16. “Strong Objectivity‘: A Response to the New Objectivity Question.Sandra Harding - 1995 - Synthese 104 (3):331 - 349.
    Where the old objectivity question asked, Objectivity or relativism: which side are you on?, the new one refuses this choice, seeking instead to bypass widely recognized problems with the conceptual framework that restricts the choices to these two. It asks, How can the notion of objectivity be updated and made useful for contemporary knowledge-seeking projects? One response to this question is the strong objectivity program that draws on feminist standpoint epistemology to provide a kind of logic of discovery for maximizing (...)
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  17. A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality.Sandra Harding - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.
    : Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  18. The Science Question in Feminism.Sandra Harding - 1988 - Synthese 76 (3):441-446.
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  19.  95
    After the Neutrality Ideal: Science, Politics, and "Strong Objectivity".Sandra Harding - 1992 - Social Research 59:567-588.
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  20. Can Theories Be Refuted? Essays on the Duhem-Quine Thesis.Sandra G. Harding - 1976 - Reidel.
  21. The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader.Sandra G. Harding (ed.) - 2011 - Duke University Press.
     
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  22.  21
    A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality.Sandra Harding - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.
    Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  23. Feminism and Methodology.Sandra Harding - 1989 - Hypatia 3 (3):162-164.
  24. Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology.Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    In this pioneering new book, Sandra Harding and Robert Figueroa bring together an important collection of original essays by leading philosophers exploring an extensive range of diversity issues for the philosophy of science and technology. The essays gathered in this volume extend current philosophical discussion of science and technology beyond the standard feminist and gender analyses that have flourished over the past two decades, by bringing a thorough and truly diverse set of cultural, racial, and ethical concerns to bear on (...)
     
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  25. Standpoint Theories: Productively Controversial.Sandra Harding - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):192 - 200.
  26. The Curious Coincidence of Feminine and African Moralities: Challenges for Feminist Theory.Sandra Harding - 1987 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 296--315.
  27.  28
    The "Racial" Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future.Sandra Harding (ed.) - 1993 - Indiana University Press.
    "The classic and recent essays gathered here will challenge scholars in the natural sciences, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and women’s studies to examine the role of racism in the construction and application of the sciences. Harding... has also created a useful text for diverse classroom settings." —Library Journal "A rich lode of readily accessible thought on the nature and practice of science in society. Highly recommended." —Choice "This is an excellent collection of essays that should prove useful in a wide range (...)
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  28. Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminisms and Epistemologies.Sandra Harding - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (3):325-332.
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  29. Both Ways.What Is‘Strong Objectivity, Sandra Harding & Donna Haraway - 1996 - In Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.), Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.
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  30.  25
    Can Theories Be Refuted?Graham Priest & Sandra Harding - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (106):73.
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  31. Feminism and Methodology Social Science Issues.Sandra G. Harding - 1987
  32.  29
    Is Gender a Variable in Conceptions of Rationality? A Survey of Issues.Sandra Harding - 1982 - Dialectica 36 (2‐3):225-242.
    SummaryPhilosophic questions about the adequacy of our prevailing Western conceptions of rationality have emerged from the growing recognition that one cannot simply “add women” as objects of knowledge to the existing bodies of our social and natural knowledge. Recent research in psychology and in moral development theory suggests that our understandings of the rationality of human activity are distorted and obscured by systematically identifying as universally desireable, as Human goals, conceptions of the self, others, and the appropriate relationships between the (...)
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  33.  72
    The Method Question.Sandra Harding - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (3):19 - 35.
    A continuing concern of many feminists and non-feminists alike has been to identify a distinctive feminist method of inquiry. This essay argues that this method question is misguided and should be abandoned. In doing so it takes up the distinctions between and relationships among methods, methodologies and epistemologies; proposes that the concern to identify sources of the power of feminist analyses motivates the method question; and suggests how to pursue this project.
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  34.  70
    Gender, Development, and Post-Enlightenment Philosophies of Science.Sandra Harding - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):146 - 167.
    Recent "gender, environment, and sustainable development" accounts raise pointed questions about the complicity of Enlightenment philosophies of science with failures of Third World development policies and the current environmental crisis. The strengths of these analyses come from distinctive ways they link androcentric, economistic, and nature-blind aspects of development thinking to "the Enlightenment dream." In doing so they share perspectives with and provide resources for other influential schools of science studies.
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  35.  14
    A World of Sciences.Sandra Harding - 2003 - In Robert Figueroa & Sandra G. Harding (eds.), Science and Other Cultures: Issues in Philosophies of Science and Technology. Routledge. pp. 49--69.
  36. Discovering Reality. Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science.Sandra Harding & Merril B. Hintikka - 1986 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 48 (2):344-345.
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  37. Objectivity for Sciences From Below.Sandra Harding - 2015 - In Jonathan Y. Tsou, Alan Richardson & Flavia Padovani (eds.), Objectivity in Science. Springer Verlag.
    Drawing on her pioneering work in feminist standpoint theory, Harding articulates and defends the “strong objectivity” program, which she subsequently tests against recent discussions of objectivity and against postcolonialist science and technology studies. Strong objectivity starts with an examination of the experiences of individuals, such as women and minorities, who have traditionally been excluded from knowledge production in order to criticize prevailing standards of objectivity - especially the “weak objectivity” of allegedly value-neutral science - and to articulate stronger standards of (...)
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  38. Transformation Vs. Resistance Identity Projects: Epistemological Resources for Social Justice Movements.Sandra Harding - 2006 - In Linda Alcoff (ed.), Identity Politics Reconsidered. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 246--263.
  39.  17
    Ascetic Intellectual Opportunities: Reply to Alison Wylie.Sandra Harding - 1987 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (sup1):75-85.
  40.  79
    From the Woman Question in Science to the Science Question in Feminism.Sandra Harding - 2005 - In Nico Stehr & Reiner Grundmann (eds.), Knowledge: Critical Concepts. Routledge. pp. 327--342.
  41.  48
    Starting Thought From Women's Lives: Eight Resources for Maximizing Objectivity.Sandra Harding - 1990 - Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):140-149.
  42.  75
    Two Influential Theories of Ignorance and Philosophy's Interests in Ignoring Them.Sandra Harding - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):20-36.
    Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud provided powerful accounts of systematic interested ignorance. Fifty years ago, Anglo-American philosophies of science stigmatized Marx's and Freud's analyses as models of irrationality. They remain disvalued today, at a time when virtually all other humanities and social science disciplines have returned to extract valuable insights from them. Here the argument is that there are reasons distinctive to philosophy why such theories were especially disvalued then and why they remain so today. However, there are even better (...)
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  43.  40
    Précis of Objectivity and Diversity: Another Logic of Scientific Research.Sandra Harding - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (7):1801-1806.
  44.  26
    Latin American Decolonial Studies: Feminist Issues.Sandra Harding - 2017 - Feminist Studies 43 (3):624.
  45.  29
    The Social Function of the Empiricist Conception of Mind.Sandra G. Harding - 1979 - Metaphilosophy 10 (1):38–47.
  46.  24
    After Eurocentrism: Challenges for the Philosophy of Science.Sandra Harding - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:311 - 319.
    Two themes in postcolonial science studies pose unusual challenges for philosophers of science. According to these accounts, the cognitive/technical core of Western sciences, not just their technologies, applications, and social institutions, is permeated by distinctive cultural and political commitments. In this sense, Western sciences are "ethnosciences." Moreover, these analysts want to delink their societies' scientific and technological projects from the West's in order to develop fully modern sciences within their own culturally distinctive scientific traditions. This paper suggests some fruitful ways (...)
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  47.  70
    Introduction. Border Crossings: Multicultural and Postcolonial Feminist Challenges to Philosophy (Part I).Uma Narayan & Sandra Harding - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (2):1-6.
  48.  16
    Introduction. Border Crossings: Multicultural and Postcolonial Feminist Challenges to Philosophy.Uma Narayan & Sandra Harding - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (2):1-6.
  49.  81
    Modernity, Science, and Democracy.Sandra Harding - 2006 - Social Philosophy Today 22:17-42.
    Thinking about Western sciences has always also meant making assumptions about modernity and about democratic social relations. Yet in recent decades the standard meanings and referents of all three of these terms—”Western sciences,” “modernity,” and “democratic social relations”—have come under skeptical scrutiny. This essay will look at three critics of modernity who also examine the political practices and consequences of Western sciences. All three also think postmodernisms to be valuable but merely symptomologies without useful prescriptions for change, and they all (...)
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  50.  67
    “Science and Democracy:” Replayed or Redesigned?Sandra Harding - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (1):5 – 18.
    Mid-Twentieth Century declarations characterizing science as a 'Little democracy' and as autonomous from society continue to shape the arguments of scientists' and critics of science studies, including Meera Nanda's arguments. Yet such an image of science has long lost whatever empirical support it ever posessed. This article shares Nanda's concern to envision sciences which support social justice projects, but not the particular criticisms she makes of Feminist, post-colonial, and post-kuhnian science studies.
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