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  1.  36
    Gun Violence and the Meaning of American Schools.Bryan R. Warnick, Sang Hyun Kim & Shannon Robinson - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (4):371-386.
    In the United States, targeted school shootings have become a distinct genre of violence. In this essay, Bryan Warnick, Sang Hyun Kim, and Shannon Robinson examine the social meanings that exist in American society that might contribute to this phenomenon, focusing on the question: “Why are schools conceptualized as appropriate places to enact this form of gun violence?” The authors analyze the social meaning of American schooling by using empirical data, everyday observations, films, and poetry, and then connect these points (...)
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  2.  62
    Student Rights, Clarence Thomas, and the Revolutionary Vision of Education.Bryan R. Warnick, Bradley Rowe & Sang Hyun Kim - 2009 - Educational Theory 59 (2):145-165.
    In his concurring opinion to the 2007 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Morse v. Frederick, Justice Clarence Thomas argues that the Tinker decision, which granted students constitutional rights in public schools, should be overturned on originalist grounds. In this essay, Bryan Warnick, Bradley Rowe, and Sang Hyun Kim make the case that Thomas’s originalist analysis is inconclusive. Instead of looking at court decisions relating to public education starting in the middle of the nineteenth century to establish original meaning, as Thomas does, (...)
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    The Problem of Authority: What Can Korean Education Learn From Dewey?Sang Hyun Kim - 2013 - Education and Culture 29 (1):64-83.
    The importance of moral education and teachers' moral authority based on Confucianism1 has long remained the central feature of Korean education. Korean society, traditionally, not only granted teachers the same authority as parents, but more significantly, attributed to them even greater responsibility for children's moral and intellectual development (Sorensen, 1994, 27-28). In a circumstance in which the teacher is regarded as a moral exemplar and is given remarkable authority by parents to develop their children's moral character, as Sorenson (1994) observed, (...)
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