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  1.  6
    Exploring the Heart Sutra.Sarah A. Mattice - 2021 - Lexington Books.
    Exploring the Heart Sutra brings an interdisciplinary philosophical approach to this much-loved Buddhist classic. This new translation with commentary situates the sutra in a Chinese context, offering fresh interpretive resources for making sense of this profound work.
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  2.  25
    Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience.Sarah A. Mattice - 2014 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Sarah A. Mattice develops a comparative intervention in contemporary metaphilosophy. Drawing on resources from hermeneutics, cognitive linguistics, aesthetics, and Chinese philosophy, she explores how philosophical language is deeply intertwined with the definition and practice of the discipline.
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  3.  41
    On ‘Rectifying’ Rectification: Reconsidering Zhengming in Light of Confucian Role Ethics.Sarah A. Mattice - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (3):247-260.
    Both an emphasis on logic and an emphasis on rhetoric lead to a kind of care for language. However, in early Greece this care for language through the lens of logic manifested in the drive to ‘get it right’, whereas in early China the care for language manifested in the pervasive concern for zhengming, for using names properly. For the early Chinese thinkers, especially the early Confucians, this was not predominantly a linguistic affair—zhengming is a key component of moral cultivation. (...)
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  4.  8
    Guanyin, Plumber, Philosopher.Sarah A. Mattice - 2024 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 50 (4):371-378.
    This paper explores the role of philosophical exemplars, focusing on two uncommon but valuable figures: Guanyin, bodhisattva of compassion, and the plumber-as-philosopher described by Mary Midgley. These figures highlight philosophical activity as benefitting from a wide variety of heterogenous sources, styles, and models, and suggest that philosophy be understood as a response to lived needs. The paper concludes with some suggestions for ways in which these exemplars might be relevant for contemporary issues in the academy.
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  5.  5
    Three Common Misconceptions about East Asian Buddhisms.Sarah A. Mattice - 2023 - In Robert H. Scott & James McRae (eds.), Introduction to Buddhist East Asia. SUNY Press. pp. 35-67.
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  6.  13
    Concepts and Categories of Emotion in East Asia. Edited by Guisi Tamburello.Sarah A. Mattice - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):224-227.
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  7.  13
    Comparative philosophy today and tomorrow: proceedings from the 2007 Uehiro CrossCurrents Philosophy Conference.Sarah A. Mattice, Geoffrey Ashton & Joshua P. Kimber (eds.) - 2009 - Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press.
    From self-cultivation to global justice, from environmental ethics to the interrelation of religion and science, this collection of essays highlights the central role of philosophy, and comparative philosophy in particular, for understanding and appreciating the connections and discontinuities of East and West.
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  8. Many Confucianisms: From Roger Ames to Jiang Qing on the Interpretive Possibilities of Ruist Traditions.Sarah A. Mattice - 2021 - In Ian M. Sullivan & Joshua Mason (eds.), One corner of the square: essays on the philosophy of Roger T. Ames. Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  9.  15
    Rethinking Combative Dialogue: Comparative Philosophy as a Resource for Examining Models of Dialogue.Sarah A. Mattice - 2010 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 19 (1):43-48.
    In this essay I am concerned with our understanding of philosophical dialogue. I will examine the most prevalent western model of dialogue—the combat model—and suggest some flaws in this model. I will outline concerns as to how standards for what counts as ‘philosophical’ are determined, and use this outline to frame preliminary objections to conceiving of philosophical dialogue as combative. Noting that philosophy is a socially and historically rooted practice, I argue that the view of philosophy as a kind of (...)
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