Results for 'Sarah Best'

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  1. Why We Are Not Morally Required to Select the Best Children: A Response to Savulescu.Sarah E. Stoller - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):364-369.
    The purpose of this paper is to review critically Julian Savulescu's principle of 'Procreative Beneficence,' which holds that prospective parents are morally obligated to select, of the possible children they could have, those with the greatest chance of leading the best life. According to this principle, prospective parents are obliged to use the technique of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select for the 'best' embryos, a decision that ought to be made based on the presence or absence of (...)
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  2.  14
    Scientific Integrity Principles and Best Practices: Recommendations From a Scientific Integrity Consortium.Alison Kretser, Delia Murphy, Stefano Bertuzzi, Todd Abraham, David B. Allison, Kathryn J. Boor, Johanna Dwyer, Andrea Grantham, Linda J. Harris, Rachelle Hollander, Chavonda Jacobs-Young, Sarah Rovito, Dorothea Vafiadis, Catherine Woteki, Jessica Wyndham & Rickey Yada - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (2):327-355.
    A Scientific Integrity Consortium developed a set of recommended principles and best practices that can be used broadly across scientific disciplines as a mechanism for consensus on scientific integrity standards and to better equip scientists to operate in a rapidly changing research environment. The two principles that represent the umbrella under which scientific processes should operate are as follows: Foster a culture of integrity in the scientific process. Evidence-based policy interests may have legitimate roles to play in influencing aspects (...)
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  3.  19
    Relax? Don’T Do It! Why Moral Realism Won't Come Cheap.Sarah McGrath - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 9.
    Relaxed realists hold that there are deep differences between moral truths and the truths studied by the empirical sciences, but they deny that these differences raise troubling metaphysical or epistemological questions about moral truths. On this view, although features such as causal inefficacy, perceptual inaccessibility, and failure to figure in the best explanations of our empirical beliefs would raise pressing skeptical concerns were they claimed to characterize some aspect of physical reality, the same is not true when it comes (...)
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  4.  32
    The Shape of Things to Come: Exploring Goal-Directed Prospection.Brittany M. Christian, Lynden K. Miles, Fiona Hoi Kei Fung, Sarah Best & C. Neil Macrae - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):471-478.
    Through the ability to preview the future , people can anticipate how best to think, feel and act in just about any setting. But exactly what factors determine the contents of prospection? Extending research on action identification and temporal construal, here we explored how action goals and temporal distance modulate the characteristics of future previews. Participants were required to imagine travelling to Egypt to climb or photograph a pyramid. Afterwards, to probe the contents of prospection, participants provided a sketch (...)
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  5. Updating as Communication.Sarah Moss - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):225-248.
    Traditional procedures for rational updating fail when it comes to self-locating opinions, such as your credences about where you are and what time it is. This paper develops an updating procedure for rational agents with self-locating beliefs. In short, I argue that rational updating can be factored into two steps. The first step uses information you recall from your previous self to form a hypothetical credence distribution, and the second step changes this hypothetical distribution to reflect information you have genuinely (...)
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  6.  11
    In Our Best Interest: A Defense of Paternalism Jason Hanna Oxford University Press, New York, 2018. 271 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐087713‐2. $51.80. [REVIEW]Sarah Conly - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):973-973.
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  7.  35
    The Right to Preventive Health Care.Sarah Conly - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):307-321.
    The right to health care is a right to care that is not too costly to the provider, considering the benefits it conveys, and is effective in bringing about the level of health needed for a good human life, not necessarily the best health possible. These considerations suggest that, where possible, society has an obligation to provide preventive health care, which is both low cost and effective, and that health care regulations should promote citizens’ engagement in reasonable preventive health (...)
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  8.  55
    The Onus of Inclusivity: Sport Policies and the Enforcement of the Women’s Category in Sport.Sarah Teetzel - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):113-127.
    With recent controversies surrounding the eligibility of athletes with disorders of sex development and hyperandrogenism, as well as continued discussion of the conditions transgender athletes must meet to compete in high-performance sport, a wide array of scholars representing a diverse range of disciplines have weighed in on both the appropriateness of classifying athletes into the female and male categories and the best practices of doing so. In response to cases of high-profile athletes’ sex being called into question, the International (...)
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  9. Plutarch's Advice to the Bride and Groom and a Consolation to His Wife: English Translations, Commentary, Interpretive Essays, and Bibliography.Sarah B. Pomeroy (ed.) - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    The collection presented here looks at two important short works from Plutarch's writings in moral philosophy; The Advice to the Bride and Groom and A Consolation to His Wife, in which he offers solace to his wife on the death of their infant son. The works reveal Plutarch at his best - informative, sympathetic, rich in narrative description - and are followed by commentaries by a number of experts, which situate Plutarch and his views on marriage in their historical (...)
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  10.  14
    Surface Reading And The Symptom That Is Only Skin-deepThe Way We Read Now, Edited by Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best with Emily Apter and Elaine Freedgood. Special Issue ofRepresentations, 108:1 , 1–148.Anne Anlin Cheng,Second Skin. Josephine Baker and the Modern Surface, 234 Pp.Thinking Through the Skin, Edited by Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey , 241 Pp.Steven Connor,The Book of Skin, 304 Pp.Naomi Segal,Consensuality. Didier Anzieu, Gender and the Sense of Touch, 286 Pp. [REVIEW]Sarah Kay - 2012 - Paragraph 35 (3):451-459.
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  11.  15
    Assessing the Remedy: The Case for Contracts in Clinical Trials.Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (4):3-12.
    Current orthodoxy in research ethics assumes that subjects of clinical trials reserve rights to withdraw at any time and without giving any reason. This view sees the right to withdraw as a simple extension of the right to refuse to participate all together. In this paper, however, I suggest that subjects should assume some responsibilities for the internal validity of the trial at consent and that these responsibilities should be captured by contract. This would allow the researcher to impose a (...)
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  12.  87
    Ethics Consultation in United States Hospitals: A National Survey.Ellen Fox, Sarah Myers & Robert A. Pearlman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):13 – 25.
    Context: Although ethics consultation is commonplace in United States (U.S.) hospitals, descriptive data about this health service are lacking. Objective: To describe the prevalence, practitioners, and processes of ethics consultation in U.S. hospitals. Design: A 56-item phone or questionnaire survey of the "best informant" within each hospital. Participants: Random sample of 600 U.S. general hospitals, stratified by bed size. Results: The response rate was 87.4%. Ethics consultation services (ECSs) were found in 81% of all general hospitals in the U.S., (...)
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  13. Weakness of Will.Sarah Buss - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (1):13–44.
    My chief aim is to explain how someone can act freely against her own best judgment. But I also have a second aim: to defend a conception of practical rationality according to which someone cannot do something freely if she believes it would be better to do something else. These aims may appear incompatible. But I argue that practical reason has the capacity to undermine itself in such a way that it produces reasons for behaving irrationally. Weakness of will (...)
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  14.  62
    II—What Should ‘Impostor Syndrome’ Be?Sarah K. Paul - 2019 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 93 (1):227-245.
    In her thought-provoking symposium contribution, ‘What Is Impostor Syndrome?’, Katherine Hawley fleshes out our everyday understanding of that concept. This response builds on Hawley’s account to ask the ameliorative question of whether the everyday concept best serves the normative goals of promoting social justice and enhancing well-being. I raise some sceptical worries about the usefulness of the notion, in so far as it is centred on doxastic attitudes that include doubt about one’s own talent or skill. I propose instead (...)
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  15.  10
    Does Ultrasociality Really Exist – and is It the Best Predictor of Human Economic Behaviors?Sarah S. Stith & Jacob M. Vigil - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  16.  4
    Pater Knows Best: Withdrawal of Medical Treatment From Infants in Scotland.Jonathan Brown & Sarah Christie - 2020 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 40 (4):682-707.
    The cases of Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans placed the withdrawal of treatment from terminally ill infants at the forefront of medical law and ethics. In the medico-legal context, Scottish court procedures materially differ from those in England. This article considers these differences in light of the possibility that a similar case might soon be called before the Scottish courts. The Court of Session would then be required to consider whether to utilise its parens patriae jurisdiction to consent to the (...)
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  17.  24
    The Moral Meanings of Miscarriage.Sarah Clark Miller - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):141-157.
    In this article, I seek to address an aspect of the general inattention to miscarriage by examining a pressing topic: the moral meanings of pregnancy loss. I focus primarily on the import of such meanings for women in their ethical relationship with themselves, while also finding significant the meaning of miscarriage in community, that is, for our shared moral lives. Exploring miscarriage as a moral phenomenon is critical for figuring out miscarriage’s impact on our ethical self-conception—on how we understand ourselves (...)
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  18.  14
    The Role of “Small Publics” in Teacher Dissent.Sarah M. Stitzlein & Amy Rector-Aranda - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):165-180.
    In this essay, Sarah Stitzlein and Amy Rector-Aranda, drawing on John Dewey's theoretical suggestions regarding how to best form publics capable of bringing about change through deliberation and action, offer teachers guidance on how to form and navigate spaces of political protest and become more effective advocates for school reform. Using Aaron Schutz's analysis of teacher activism as a point of departure, Stitzlein and Rector-Aranda argue for the development in schools of “small publics,” that is, Deweyan democratic spaces (...)
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  19.  36
    A Neo‐Stoic Approach to Epistemic Agency.Sarah Wright - 2013 - Philosophical Issues 23 (1):262-275.
    What is the best model of epistemic agency for virtue epistemology? Insofar as the intellectual and moral virtues are similar, it is desirable to develop models of agency that are similar across the two realms. Unlike Aristotle, the Stoics present a model of the virtues on which the moral and intellectual virtues are unified. The Stoics’ materialism and determinism also help to explain how we can be responsible for our beliefs even when we cannot believe otherwise. In this paper (...)
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  20.  22
    Recall of Participation in Research Projects in Cancer Genetics: Some Implications for Research Ethics.Sarah Cooke, Gillian Crawford, Michael Parker, Anneke Lucassen & Nina Hallowell - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):180-184.
    The aim of this study is to assess patients' recall of their previous research participation. Recall was established during interviews and compared with entries from clinical notes. Participants were 49 patients who had previously participated in different types of research. Of the 49 patients, 45 (92%) interviewees recalled 69 of 109 (63%) study participations. Level of recall varied according to the type of research, some participants clearly recalled the details of research aims, giving consent and research procedures. Others recalled procedures (...)
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  21.  1
    Agnes Goes to Prison: Gender Authenticity, Transgender Inmates in Prisons for Men, and Pursuit of “The Real Deal”.Sarah Fenstermaker & Valerie Jenness - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (1):5-31.
    Historically developed along gender lines and arguably the most sex segregated of institutions, U.S. prisons are organized around the assumption of a gender binary. In this context, the existence and increasing visibility of transgender prisoners raise questions about how gender is accomplished by transgender prisoners in prisons for men. This analysis draws on official data and original interview data from 315 transgender inmates in 27 California prisons for men to focus analytic attention on the pursuit of “the real deal”—a concept (...)
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  22. Wait, But Why? Challenging the Intuitive Force of Substance Dualism.Sarah Lane Ritchie - 2021 - Scientia et Fides 9 (1):241-255.
    In responding to Joshua Farris’ The Soul of Theological Anthropology, I suggest several reasons for questioning the theological need for substance dualism in any form. Specifically, I argue that it is not at the level of analytic argumentation that the mind or soul is best understood, and that the sciences do indeed challenge substance dualism. In making this argument, I examine the roles of intuition and theological pre-commitments in one’s determination of the correct understanding of the mind or soul. (...)
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  23. Mathematics as Make-Believe: A Constructive Empiricist Account.Sarah Elizabeth Hoffman - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada)
    Any philosophy of science ought to have something to say about the nature of mathematics, especially an account like constructive empiricism in which mathematical concepts like model and isomorphism play a central role. This thesis is a contribution to the larger project of formulating a constructive empiricist account of mathematics. The philosophy of mathematics developed is fictionalist, with an anti-realist metaphysics. In the thesis, van Fraassen's constructive empiricism is defended and various accounts of mathematics are considered and rejected. Constructive empiricism (...)
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  24.  12
    Prolactin in Man: A Tale of Two Promoters.Sarah Gerlo, Julian R. E. Davis, Dixie L. Mager & Ron Kooijman - 2006 - Bioessays 28 (10):1051-1055.
    The pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL) is best known for its role in the regulation of lactation. Recent evidence furthermore indicates PRL is required for normal reproduction in rodents. Here, we report on the insertion of two transposon-like DNA sequences in the human prolactin gene, which together function as an alternative promoter directing extrapituitary PRL expression. Indeed, the transposable elements contain transcription factor binding sites that have been shown to mediate PRL transcription in human uterine decidualised endometrial cells and lymphocytes. (...)
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  25.  52
    Evaluating Interventions in Health: A Reconciliatory Approach.Jonathan Wolff, Sarah Edwards, Sarah Richmond, O. R. R. Shepley & Geraint Rees - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (9):455-463.
    Health-related Quality of Life measures have recently been attacked from two directions, both of which criticize the preference-based method of evaluating health states they typically incorporate. One attack, based on work by Daniel Kahneman and others, argues that ‘experience’ is a better basis for evaluation. The other, inspired by Amartya Sen, argues that ‘capability’ should be the guiding concept. In addition, opinion differs as to whether health evaluation measures are best derived from consultations with the general public, with patients, (...)
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  26.  6
    Looking Ahead: Addressing Ethical Challenges in Public Health Practice.Nancy M. Baum, Sarah E. Gollust, Susan D. Goold & Peter D. Jacobson - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):657-667.
    Ethical challenges in public health can have a significant impact on the health of communities if they impede efficiencies and best practices. Competing needs for resources and a plurality of values can challenge public health policymakers and practitioners to make fair and effective decisions for their communities. In this paper, the authors offer an analytic framework designed to assist policymakers and practitioners in managing the ethical tensions they face in daily practice. Their framework is built upon the following set (...)
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  27.  13
    Creative Work and Emotional Labour in the Television Industry.David Hesmondhalgh & Sarah Baker - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):97-118.
    In keeping with the focus of this special section, we concentrate initially on some of the problems of autonomist Marxist concepts such as `immaterial labour', `affective labour' and `precarity' for understanding work in the cultural industries. We then briefly review some relevant media theory and some key recent sociological research on cultural labour, which we believe may be more useful than autonomist concepts in developing empirically informed critique. The main body of the article then consists of an ethnographic account of (...)
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  28.  8
    The Evolutionary Foundation of Perceiving One's Own Emotions.Sarah L. Strout, Rosemarie I. Sokol, James D. Laird & Nicholas S. Thompson - 2004 - Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):493 - 502.
    Much research in the field of emotions has shown that people differ in the cues that they use to perceive their own emotions. People who are more responsive to personal cues (personal cuers) make use of cues arising from their own bodies and behavior; people who are less responsive to personal cues (situational cuers) make use of cues arising from the world around them. An evolutionary explanation of this well-documented phenomenon is that it occurs because of the operation of a (...)
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  29.  14
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Ethics Consultation in U.S. Hospitals: A National Survey".Ellen Fox, Sarah Myers & Robert Pearlman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):1-3.
    Context: Although ethics consultation is commonplace in United States hospitals, descriptive data about this health service are lacking. Objective: To describe the prevalence, practitioners, and processes of ethics consultation in U.S. hospitals. Design: A 56-item phone or questionnaire survey of the “best informant” within each hospital. Participants: Random sample of 600 U.S. general hospitals, stratified by bed size. Results: The response rate was 87.4%. Ethics consultation services were found in 81% of all general hospitals in the U.S., and in (...)
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  30.  19
    Plutarch's Advice to the Bride and Groom and a Consolation to His Wife: English Translations, Commentary, Interpretive Essays, and Bibliography.Sarah B. Pomeroy (ed.) - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    The collection presented here looks at two important short works from Plutarch's writings in moral philosophy; The Advice to the Bride and Groom and A Consolation to His Wife, in which he offers solace to his wife on the death of their infant son. The works reveal Plutarch at his best - informative, sympathetic, rich in narrative description - and are followed by commentaries by a number of experts, which situate Plutarch and his views on marriage in their historical (...)
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  31.  21
    Addressing Educational Accountability and Political Legitimacy with Citizen Responsibility.Sarah M. Stitzlein - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (5):563-580.
    In this essay, Sarah Stitzlein addresses a key current crisis in public education: accountability. Rather than centrally being about poor performance of teachers or inefficiency of schools, as we most often hear in media outlets and in education reform speeches, Stitzlein argues the crisis is at heart one about citizen responsibility and political legitimacy. She claims that the recent accountability movement has shifted the onus of curing society's problems almost exclusively onto schools, but contends that these burdens should not (...)
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  32.  35
    Assessing Ethical Trade-Offs in Ecological Field Studies.Kirsten M. Parris, Sarah C. McCall, Michael A. McCarthy, Ben A. Minteer, Katie Steele, Sarah Bekessy & Fabien Medvecky - 2010 - Journal of Applied Ecology 47 (1):227-234.
    Summary 1. Ecologists and conservation biologists consider many issues when designing a field study, such as the expected value of the data, the interests of the study species, the welfare of individual organisms and the cost of the project. These different issues or values often conflict; however, neither animal ethics nor environmental ethics provides practical guidance on how to assess trade-offs between them. -/- 2. We developed a decision framework for considering trade-offs between values in ecological research, drawing on the (...)
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  33. The Myth of the Mental (Illness).Sarah Vincent - 2014 - In David Boersema (ed.), Dimensions of Moral Agency. Cambridge Scholars. pp. 30-37.
    Thomas Szasz has wrestled with the following question: Does mental illness even exist? Here, I sketch two provocative papers by Szasz and detail his reasons for criticizing the concept ‘mental illness.’ I will proceed to highlight where I think Szasz’s writing is philosophically dubious, despite its role in forcing us to think critically about ‘mental illness.’ I will conclude that his argument is best left behind as an antiquated take on neurodivergence. Finally, I will propose what I think is (...)
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  34. The Global Christian Forum, A Narrative History: ‘Limuru, Manado and Onwards’.Sarah Rowland Jones - 2013 - Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies 30 (4):226-242.
    The Global Christian Forum’s international gathering in Limuru, Kenya, in 2007, affirmed the value of this initiative for promoting relationships between Christian traditions with little if any mutual encounter. With this fresh mandate, the Forum organized further regional meetings and extended its methodology into other contexts. Following a second global gathering at Manado, Indonesia, in 2011, it continues to develop its activities. Though its minimal structures and staffing bring challenges, it still aims to deliver what has been described as ‘the (...)
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  35. Maya Deren: Incomplete Control.Sarah Keller - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Maya Deren was a Russian-born American filmmaker, theorist, poet, and photographer working at the forefront of the American avant-garde in the 1940s and 1950s. Influenced by Jean Cocteau and Marcel Duchamp, she is best known for her seminal film Meshes of the Afternoon, a dream-like experiment with time and symbol, looped narrative and provocative imagery, setting the stage for the twentieth-century's groundbreaking aesthetic movements and films. Maya Deren assesses both the filmmaker's completed work and her numerous unfinished projects, arguing (...)
     
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  36.  84
    Stephen Greenblatt, New Historicism, and Cultural History, or, What We Talk About When We Talk About Interdisciplinarity.Sarah Maza - 2004 - Modern Intellectual History 1 (2):249-265.
    Michael Warner, a literary critic with a keen sense of history, wrote in 1987 that “New Historicism is a label that historians don't like very much because they understand something different by historicism. But nobody's asking historians….” This essay is an answer to questions nobody asked me, questions about interdisciplinarity and the differences between literary critical and historical practices. A return to historically informed literary criticism, which many critics still consider a dominant trend in the profession, emerged in the early (...)
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  37.  16
    Wench Tactics? Openings in Conditions of Closure.Ruth Fletcher, Diamond Ashiagbor, Nicola Barker, Katie Cruz, Nadine El-Enany, Nikki Godden-Rasul, Emily Grabham, Sarah Keenan, Ambreena Manji, Julie McCandless, Sheelagh McGuinness, Sara Ramshaw, Yvette Russell, Harriet Samuels, Ann Stewart & Dania Thomas - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (1):1-23.
    Picking up the question of what FLaK might be, this editorial considers the relationship between openness and closure in feminist legal studies. How do we draw on feminist struggles for openness in common resources, from security to knowledge, as we inhabit a compromised space in commercial publishing? We think about this first in relation to the content of this issue: on image-based abuse continuums, asylum struggles, trials of protestors, customary justice, and not-so-timely reparations. Our thoughts take us through the different (...)
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  38.  4
    Exemplary Paternalism: A Consideration of Confucian Models of Moral Oversight.Sarah Flavel & Brad Hall - 2020 - Culture and Dialogue 8 (2):220-250.
    In this article we examine Classical Confucian political thinking through the lens of paternalism. We situate Confucianism amid contemporary models of paternalism to show that Confucianism can be understood as a soft form of paternalism regarding its method. Confucianism stresses cultivation of the people by moral exemplars to guide the people to act in ways that are in their own best interests. This is in contrast to use of law and punishment as a deterrent of unwanted behaviours of the (...)
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  39.  12
    From Knowing to Understanding: Revisiting Consent.Kit Rempala, Marley Hornewer, Joseph Vukov, Rohan Meda & Sarah Khan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):33-35.
    Dickert et al. (2020) effectively address how factors such as time limitations, stress, and illness severity in acute conditions warrant a deeper evaluation of how current consent processes serve patients. While data suggests that patients “prefer to be asked for permission upfront rather than waiving consent” (2), consent forms themselves “are frequently long and technical, follow rigid templates, and contain language that appears to prioritize institutional protection” (1). Such findings elucidate patients’ valuation of personal agency over settling for the “benefit (...)
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  40.  20
    The Just as an Absent Ground in Plato's Cratylus.Sarah Horton - 2021 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):281-292.
    Through a study of nature and paternal power, this paper sheds light on the neglected theme of the relation between language and justice in Plato’s Cratylus. The dialogue inquires after the correctness of names, and it turns out that no lineage leads us back to a natural ground of names. Every lineage breaks; nature is always disrupted by the monstrous. It does not follow, however, that names are mere conventions without significance: on the contrary, naming is best understood as (...)
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  41. Good Intentions and the Road to Hell.Sarah K. Paul - 2017 - Philosophical Explorations 20 (2):40-54.
    G.E.M. Anscombe famously remarked that an adequate philosophy of psychology was needed before we could do ethics. Fifty years have passed, and we should now ask what significance our best theories of the psychology of agency have for moral philosophy. My focus is on non-moral conceptions of autonomy and self-governance that emphasize the limits of deliberation -- the way in which one's cares render certain options unthinkable, one's intentions and policies filter out what is inconsistent with them, and one's (...)
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  42. Solomon Ibn Gabirol: Universal Hylomorphism and the Psychic Imagination.Sarah Pessin - 2000 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
    In this project, I offer an extended treatment of Gabirol's metaphysical doctrine of universal hylomorphism . My thesis is that, for Gabirol , matter signifies the most sublime moment of the Neoplatonic Intellect, and, by extension, the pre-determinate, essential existence which each thing has in virtue of its subsistence in said Intellect. My reading thus identifies matter with a grade of pure Being. Drawing upon Latin, Hebrew and Arabic Fons Vitae materials, I develop and support this thesis in light of (...)
     
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  43.  33
    Technology and the Wilderness Experience.Sarah Pohl - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (2):147-163.
    As mechanical devices become lighter, sleeker, and cheaper, the issue of technology in wilderness becomes an increasingly more important ethical concern because many high-tech luxuries or devices stand to separate the backcountry traveler from the very goals he or she hopes to actualize by recreating in wilderness. As recreationists, we need to determine which items are essential and which aredistracting, separating important “equipment” from needless “devices,” and exercising the self-control to carry only what we need. This process can be called (...)
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  44.  27
    Searching the Animal Psyche with Charles Le Brun.Sarah R. Cohen - 2010 - Annals of Science 67 (3):353-382.
    Summary Around 1670 the French court painter and Academician Charles Le Brun produced a series of drawings featuring naturalistic animal heads, as well as imaginary heads in which he refashioned various nonhuman animal species to make humanoid physiognomies. What were the purpose and significance of these unusual works? I argue that they show Le Brun's interest in what we today would call animal psychology: focusing upon the sensory organs and their connections with the animal's brain, Le Brun studied his animals (...)
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  45.  1
    Anticipating the Monsoon: The Necessity and Impossibility of the Seasonal Weather Forecast for South Asia, 1886–1953.Sarah Carson - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Science:1-21.
    This article examines the most controversial of the activities of the India Meteorological Department : long-term seasonal forecasting for the South Asian subcontinent. Under the pressure of recurrent famines, in 1886 the imperial IMD commenced annual issue of monsoon predictions several months in advance, focused on one variable: rainfall. This state service was new to global late nineteenth-century meteorology, attempted first and most rigorously in India. Successive IMD leaders adapted the forecast in light of scientific and infrastructural developments, continuously revising (...)
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  46.  14
    A Reply to Victor (1888).Sarah Elizabeth Holmes - unknown
    WQ.1 “Independent men and women, in independent homes, leading separate and independent lives, with full freedom to form and dissolve relations, and with perfectly equal opportunities to happiness, development, and love.” I leave out the word “rights,” doubtful I can use it without being misunderstood. Perhaps I can succeed in dispensing with its use altogether. This ideal, so stated, is attractive to me and completely in harmony with my idea of the course in life which will best further human (...)
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  47.  18
    Expertise in Evidence-Based Medicine: A Tale of Three Models.Sarah Wieten - 2018 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 13:2.
    BackgroundExpertise has been a contentious concept in Evidence-Based Medicine. Especially in the early days of the movement, expertise was taken to be exactly what EBM was rebelling against—the authoritarian pronouncements about “best” interventions dutifully learned in medical schools, sometimes with dire consequences. Since then, some proponents of EBM have tried various ways of reincorporating the idea of expertise into EBM, with mixed results. However, questions remain. Is expertise evidence? If not, what is it good for, if anything?MethodsIn this article, (...)
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  48. Morality's Authority.Sarah Stroud - 1994 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    What is the nature and scope of morality's authority? How seriously ought we to take its demands? What would it be like to grant its requirements supreme importance in one's life? This dissertation addresses such questions by considering the nature and extent of morality's authority from several vantage points. ;The first two chapters discuss a charge made by Bernard Williams and others. According to this charge, commitment to modern moral theories would force us to devalue or suppress our personal projects (...)
     
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  49. Computerized Symbol Digit Modalities Test in a Swiss Pediatric Cohort – Part 2: Clinical Implementation.Marie-Noëlle Klein, Ursina Jufer-Riedi, Sarah Rieder, Céline Hochstrasser, Michelle Steiner, Li Mei Cao, Anthony Feinstein, Sandra Bigi & Karen Lidzba - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    BackgroundInformation processing speed is a marker for cognitive function. It is associated with neural maturation and increases during development. Traditionally, IPS is measured using paper and pencil tasks requiring fine motor skills. Such skills are often impaired in patients with neurological conditions. Therefore, an alternative that does not need motor dexterity is desirable. One option is the computerized symbol digit modalities test, which requires the patient to verbally associate numbers with symbols.MethodsEighty-six participants were examined, 38 healthy and 48 hospitalized for (...)
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  50. The Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings.Raja Halwani, Alan Soble, Sarah Hoffman & Jacob Held (eds.) - 2017 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This best-selling volume examines the nature, morality, and social meanings of contemporary sexual phenomena. Updated and new discussion questions offer students starting points for debate in both the classroom and the bedroom.
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