Results for 'Sarah C. Tyler'

997 found
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  1.  11
    Automaticity of lexical access in deaf and hearing bilinguals: Cross-linguistic evidence from the color Stroop task across five languages.Rain G. Bosworth, Eli M. Binder, Sarah C. Tyler & Jill P. Morford - 2021 - Cognition 212 (C):104659.
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  2. Value Commitment, Resolute Choice, and the Normative Foundations of Behavioural Welfare Economics.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):562-577.
    Given the endowment effect, the role of attention in decision-making, and the framing effect, most behavioral economists agree that it would be a mistake to accept the satisfaction of revealed preferences as the normative criterion of choice. Some have suggested that what makes agents better off is not the satisfaction of revealed preferences, but ‘true’ preferences, which may not always be observed through choice. While such preferences may appear to be an improvement over revealed preferences, some philosophers of economics have (...)
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  3. When is Green Nudging Ethically Permissible?C. Tyler DesRoches, Daniel Fischer, Julia Silver, Philip Arthur, Rebecca Livernois, Timara Crichlow, Gil Hersch, Michiru Nagatsu & Joshua K. Abbott - 2023 - Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 60:101236.
    This review article provides a new perspective on the ethics of green nudging. We advance a new model for assessing the ethical permissibility of green nudges (GNs). On this model, which provides normative guidance for policymakers, a GN is ethically permissible when the intervention is (1) efficacious, (2) cost-effective, and (3) the advantages of the GN (i.e. reducing the environmental harm) are not outweighed by countervailing costs/harms (i.e. for nudgees). While traditional ethical objections to nudges (paternalism, etc.) remain potential normative (...)
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  4.  13
    When Is Work Unjust? Confronting the Choice between ‘Pluralistic’ and ‘Unifying’ Approaches.Sarah C. Goff - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (2):218-234.
    Individuals have different experiences of work when they are self-employed, when they perform tasks in the gig economy, and when they follow directives from managers. But such differences are not represented in some of the most prominent non-ideal theories of work. These describe workers as a coherent group, with a position in the structure of the liberal capitalist economy. I present an alternative that does better at acknowledging difference, through a description of work and workers that has greater ‘pluralism’ and (...)
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  5. Virtual Consumption, Sustainability & Human Well-Being.Kenneth R. Pike & C. Tyler Desroches - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):361-378.
    There is widespread consensus that present patterns of consumption could lead to the permanent impossibility of maintaining those patterns and, perhaps, the existence of the human race. While many patterns of consumption qualify as ‘sustainable’ there is one in particular that deserves greater attention: virtual consumption. We argue that virtual consumption — the experience of authentic consumptive experiences replicated by alternative means — has the potential to reduce the deleterious consequences of real consumption by redirecting some consumptive behavior from shifting (...)
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  6. On the Concept and Conservation of Critical Natural Capital.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science (N/A):1-22.
    Ecological economics is an interdisciplinary science that is primarily concerned with developing interventions to achieve sustainable ecological and economic systems. While ecological economists have, over the last few decades, made various empirical, theoretical, and conceptual advancements, there is one concept in particular that remains subject to confusion: critical natural capital. While critical natural capital denotes parts of the environment that are essential for the continued existence of our species, the meaning of terms commonly associated with this concept, such as ‘non-substitutable’ (...)
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  7. The Eroding Artificial/Natural Distinction: Some Consequences for Ecology and Economics.C. Tyler DesRoches, Stephen Andrew Inkpen & Thomas L. Green - 2019 - In Michiru Nagatsu & Attilia Ruzzene (eds.), Contemporary Philosophy and Social Science: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue. New York: pp. 39-57.
    Since Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), historians and philosophers of science have paid increasing attention to the implications of disciplinarity. In this chapter we consider restrictions posed to interdisciplinary exchange between ecology and economics that result from a particular kind of commitment to the ideal of disciplinary purity, that is, that each discipline is defined by an appropriate, unique set of objects, methods, theories, and aims. We argue that, when it comes to the objects of study in (...)
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  8. The Preservation Paradox and Natural Capital.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Ecosystem Services: Science, Policy and Practice 101058 (N/A):1-7.
    Many ecological economists have argued that some natural capital should be preserved for posterity. Yet, among environmental philosophers, the preservation paradox entails that preserving parts of nature, including those denoted by natural capital, is impossible. The paradox claims that nature is a realm of phenomena independent of intentional human agency, that preserving and restoring nature require intentional human agency, and, therefore, no one can preserve or restore nature (without making it artificial). While this article argues that the preservation paradox is (...)
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  9.  42
    Modeling the precautionary principle with lexical utilities.Paul Bartha & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):8701-8740.
    Confronted with the possibility of severe environmental harms, such as catastrophic climate change, some researchers have suggested that we should abandon the principle at the heart of standard decision theory—the injunction to maximize expected utility—and embrace a different one: the Precautionary Principle. Arguably, the most sophisticated philosophical treatment of the Precautionary Principle is due to Steel. Steel interprets PP as a qualitative decision rule and appears to conclude that a quantitative decision-theoretic statement of PP is both impossible and unnecessary. In (...)
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  10. What is Natural about Natural Capital during the Anthropocene?C. Tyler DesRoches - 2018 - Sustainability 1 (10):806.
    The concept of natural capital denotes a rich variety of natural processes, such as ecosystems, that produce economically valuable goods and services. The Anthropocene signals a diminished state of nature, however, with some scholars claiming that no part of the Earth’s surface remains untouched. What are ecological economists to make of natural capital during the Anthropocene? Is natural capital still a coherent concept? What is the conceptual relationship between nature and natural capital? This article wrestles with John Stuart Mill’s two (...)
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  11. Some Truths Don’t Matter: The Case of Strong Sustainability.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (2):184-196.
    1. Social scientific models of sustainable development show that, for the goal of sustainability, the aggregate level of capital must remain intact. With respect to these models, there is no greate...
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  12.  29
    Testing the attentional boundary conditions of subliminal semantic priming: the influence of semantic and phonological task sets.Sarah C. Adams & Markus Kiefer - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  13. The Relatively Infinite Value of the Environment.Paul Bartha & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (2):328-353.
    Some environmental ethicists and economists argue that attributing infinite value to the environment is a good way to represent an absolute obligation to protect it. Others argue against modelling the value of the environment in this way: the assignment of infinite value leads to immense technical and philosophical difficulties that undermine the environmentalist project. First, there is a problem of discrimination: saving a large region of habitat is better than saving a small region; yet if both outcomes have infinite value, (...)
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  14.  58
    The Complex Nature of Hippocampal-Striatal Interactions in Spatial Navigation.Sarah C. Goodroe, Jon Starnes & Thackery I. Brown - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  15. The Concept of Sustainability.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2023 - In Byron Williston (ed.), Environmental Ethics for Canadians (3rd Edition). New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 385-390.
    American philosopher Wilfrid Sellars (1962) once said that “the aim of philosophy, abstractly formulated, is to understand how things in the broadest possible sense hang together in the broadest possible sense.” My main question is this: within the context of contemporary sustainability science, how does the concept of ‘sustainability’ in the broadest possible sense of the concept hang together in the broadest possible sense? I will answer this question by advancing two new explicative definitions of sustainability that jointly constitute a (...)
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  16.  39
    Heeding the voice of experience: The role of talker variation in lexical access.Sarah C. Creel, Richard N. Aslin & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):633-664.
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  17. On Aristotle's Natural Limit.C. Tyler DesRoches - forthcoming - History of Political Economy.
  18.  35
    Too Much of a Good Thing: How Novelty Biases and Vocabulary Influence Known and Novel Referent Selection in 18‐Month‐Old Children and Associative Learning Models.Sarah C. Kucker, Bob McMurray & Larissa K. Samuelson - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):463-493.
    Identifying the referent of novel words is a complex process that young children do with relative ease. When given multiple objects along with a novel word, children select the most novel item, sometimes retaining the word‐referent link. Prior work is inconsistent, however, on the role of object novelty. Two experiments examine 18‐month‐old children's performance on referent selection and retention with novel and known words. The results reveal a pervasive novelty bias on referent selection with both known and novel names and, (...)
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  19. On the Historical Roots of Natural Capital in the Writings of Carl Linnaeus.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2018 - In Luca Fiorito, Scott Scheall & Carlos Eduardo Suprinyak (eds.), Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology. Emerald Publishing. pp. 103-117.
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  20. Situating Environmental Philosophy in Canada.C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston - 2019 - In C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston (eds.), Canadian Environmental Philosophy. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The volume includes topics from political philosophy and normative ethics on the one hand to philosophy of science and the philosophical underpinnings of water management policy on the other. It contains reflections on ecological nationalism, the legacy of Grey Owl, the meaning of ‘outside’ to Canadians, the paradigm shift from mechanism to ecology in our understanding of nature, the meaning of the concept of the Anthropocene, the importance of humans self-identifying as ‘earthlings’, the challenges of biodiversity protection and the status (...)
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  21. Water Rights and Moral Limits to Water Markets.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2019 - In C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston (eds.), Canadian Environmental Philosophy. Mcgill-Queen's University Press. pp. 217-233.
    This chapter argues that the human right to water entails specific moral limits to commodifying water. While free-market economists have generally recognized no such limits, the famous Canadian environmental thinker Maude Barlow has claimed that the human right to water entails that no water markets should be permitted. With a Lockean conception of the human right to water, this chapter argues that both views are mistaken. If water markets prevent people from obtaining some minimal and proportional share of water, by (...)
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  22. The World as a Garden: a Philosophical Analysis of Natural Capital in Economics.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2015 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 8 (2):121.
    This dissertation undertakes a philosophical analysis of “natural capital” and argues that this concept has prompted economists to view nature in a radically novel manner. Formerly, economists referred to nature and natural products as a collection of inert materials to be drawn upon in isolation and then rearranged by human agents to produce commodities. More recently, however, nature is depicted as a collection of active, modifiable, and economically valuable processes, often construed as ecosystems that produce marketable goods and services gratis. (...)
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  23. Policy Advice Policy Advice for Public Participation in British Columbia Forest Management.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2007 - Forestry Chronicle 5 (83):672-681.
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  24.  36
    Fair trade: global problems and individual responsibilities.Sarah C. Goff - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (4):521-543.
  25.  26
    A content analysis of the views of genetics professionals on race, ancestry, and genetics.Sarah C. Nelson, Joon-Ho Yu, Jennifer K. Wagner, Tanya M. Harrell, Charmaine D. Royal & Michael J. Bamshad - forthcoming - AJOB Empirical Bioethics:1-13.
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  26.  33
    BLOG: Which Option is Best for Me? A Values-Based Proposal for Behavioral Economists.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Justice Everywhere: A Blog About Philosophy in Public Affairs.
  27. Canadian Environmental Philosophy.C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston (eds.) - 2019 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Canadian Environmental Philosophy is the first collection of essays to take up theoretical and practical issues in environmental philosophy today, from a Canadian perspective. The essays cover various subjects, including ecological nationalism, the legacy of Grey Owl, the meaning of “outside” to Canadians, the paradigm shift from mechanism to ecology in our understanding of nature, the meaning and significance of the Anthropocene, the challenges of biodiversity protection in Canada, the conservation status of crossbred species in the age of climate change, (...)
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  28. The World as a Garden: A Philosophical Analysis of Natural Capital in Economics.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2015 - Dissertation, University of British Columbia
    This dissertation undertakes a philosophical analysis of “natural capital” and argues that this concept has prompted economists to view Nature in a radically novel manner. Formerly, economists referred to Nature and natural products as a collection of inert materials to be drawn upon in isolation and then rearranged by human agents to produce commodities. More recently, nature is depicted as a collection of active, modifiable, and economically valuable processes, often construed as ecosystems that produce marketable goods and services gratis. Nature (...)
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  29.  21
    The Nothoi of Kynosarges.Sarah C. Humphreys - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:88-95.
  30.  21
    Maintaining credibility when communicating uncertainty: the role of directionality.Sarah C. Jenkins & Adam J. L. Harris - 2020 - Thinking and Reasoning 27 (1):97-123.
    Risk communicators often need to communicate probabilistic predictions. On occasion, an event with 10% likelihood will occur, or one with 90% likelihood will not – a probabilistically unexpected ou...
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  31.  11
    Resting State Connectivity Between Medial Temporal Lobe Regions and Intrinsic Cortical Networks Predicts Performance in a Path Integration Task.Sarah C. Izen, Elizabeth R. Chrastil & Chantal E. Stern - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  32. Climate change and the threat to civilization.Daniel Steel, C. Tyler DesRoches & Kian Mintz-Woo - 2022 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 42 (119):e2210525119.
    Despite recognizing many adverse impacts, the climate science literature has had little to say about the conditions under which climate change might threaten civilization. Discussions of the mechanisms whereby climate change might cause the collapse of current civilizations has mostly been the province of journalists, philosophers, and novelists. We propose that this situation should change. In this opinion piece, we call for treating the mechanisms and uncertainties associated with climate collapse as a critically important topic for scientific inquiry. Doing so (...)
     
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  33. Cambridge social ontology: an interview with Tony Lawson.Tony Lawson & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2009 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):100.
  34.  40
    Family tombs and tomb cult in ancient Athens: tradition or traditionalism?Sarah C. Humphreys - 1980 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:96-126.
    Fustel de Coulanges' thesis that ancient society was founded upon the cult of ancestral tombs has had, for a thoroughly self-contradictory argument, a remarkably successful career. Neither Fustel himself nor the many subsequent scholars who have quoted his views with approval faced clearly the difficulty of deriving a social structure dominated by corporate descent groups from the veneration of tombs placed in individually owned landed property. On the whole, historians have tended to play down Fustel's insistence on the relation between (...)
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  35.  14
    1-s Productions: A Validation of an Efficient Measure of Clock Variability.Sarah C. Maaß & Hedderik van Rijn - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12:428131.
    Objective: Clock variance is an important statistic in many clinical and developmental studies. Existing methods require a large number of trials for accurate clock variability assessment, which is problematic in studies using clinical or either young or aged participants. Furthermore, these existing methods often implicitly convolute clock and memory processes, making it difficult to disentangle whether the clock or memory system are driving the observed deviations. Here we assessed whether twenty repeated productions of a well-engrained interval (1 second), a task (...)
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  36.  21
    Object and word familiarization differentially boost retention in fast-mapping.Sarah C. Kucker & Larissa K. Samuelson - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  37.  10
    What’s in a Survey? Simulation-Induced Selection Effects in Astronomy.Sarah C. Gallagher & Chris Smeenk - 2023 - In Nora Mills Boyd, Siska De Baerdemaeker, Kevin Heng & Vera Matarese (eds.), Philosophy of Astrophysics: Stars, Simulations, and the Struggle to Determine What is Out There. Springer Verlag. pp. 207819642-222831658.
    Observational astronomy is plagued with selection effects that must be taken into account when interpreting data from astronomical surveys. Because of the physical limitations of observing time and instrument sensitivity, datasets are rarely complete. However, determining specifically what is missing from any sample is not always straightforward. For example, there are always more faint objects (such as galaxies) than bright ones in any brightness-limited sample, but faint objects may not be of the same kind as bright ones. Assuming they are (...)
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  38.  3
    The Outrageous Idea of the Missional Professor.Sarah C. Geis - 2015 - Philosophia Christi 17 (2):491-494.
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  39. Revamping the Image of Science for the Anthropocene.S. Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    In 2016, a multidisciplinary body of scholars within the International Commission on Stratigraphy—the Anthropocene Working Group—recommended that the world officially recognize the Anthropocene as a new geological epoch. The most contested claim about the Anthropocene, that humans are a major geological and environmental force on par with natural forces, has proven to be a hotbed for discussion well beyond the science of geology. One reason for this is that it compels many natural and social scientists to confront problems and systems (...)
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  40.  15
    Childhood Adversity and Dimensional Variations in Adult Sustained Attention.Sarah C. Vogel, Michael Esterman, Joseph DeGutis, Jeremy B. Wilmer, Kerry J. Ressler & Laura T. Germine - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  41.  89
    Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information.Sarah C. Creel & Melanie A. Tumlin - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):224-260.
    Three experiments explored online recognition in a nonspeech domain, using a novel experimental paradigm. Adults learned to associate abstract shapes with particular melodies, and at test they identified a played melody’s associated shape. To implicitly measure recognition, visual fixations to the associated shape versus a distractor shape were measured as the melody played. Degree of similarity between associated melodies was varied to assess what types of pitch information adults use in recognition. Fixation and error data suggest that adults naturally recognize (...)
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  42.  14
    Freedom and Justice in Trade Governance.Sarah C. Goff - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (3):401-412.
    Two recent books consider the future of trade governance.Consent and Tradeproposes reforms to trade agreements so that states can consent more freely to their terms.On Trade Justicedefends reforms to the World Trade Organization, arguing that multilateralism is the foundation for a “new global deal” on trade. Each book describes trade's distinctive features and proposes a principle to regulate both trade and trade governance.Consent and Tradedefends a principle of respect for state consent in trade agreements.On Trade Justiceoffers a theory of trade (...)
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  43.  13
    The Impact of Trade Policy Decisions on Social Justice.Sarah C. Goff - 2020 - Res Publica 27 (1):59-76.
    Some recent trade decisions, such as the U.S.’s imposition of protectionist measures against China, have attracted fervent popular support as well as outrage. Critics of these trade policies argue that they fail to promote society’s own interests. This paper catalogues the different ways that trade decisions can hinder and facilitate a society’s pursuit of social justice. I adopt a simple description of trade liberalization: a society forgoes the use of certain policy options, in order to pursue greater economic productivity through (...)
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  44. When Ecology Needs Economics and Economics Needs Ecology: Interdisciplinary Exchange during the Anthropocene.S. Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):203-221.
    1. A multidisciplinary group of scholars within the International Commission on Stratigraphy – known as the Anthropocene Working Group – recently recommended the Anthropocene as a new geological ep...
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  45.  66
    Augustine and the Cognitive Cause of Stoic Preliminary Passions ( Propatheiai ).Sarah C. Byers - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):433-448.
    Augustine made a significant contribution to the history of philosophical accounts of affectivity which scholars have not yet noticed. He resolved a problem with the Stoic theory as it was known to him: the question of the cognitive cause of "preliminary passions" ( propatheiai ), reflex-like affective reactions which must be immediately controlled if a morally bad emotion is to be avoided. He identified this cognitive cause as momentary doubt, as I demonstrate by citing passages from sermons spanning twenty-seven years (...)
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  46. Philosophy of Science for Sustainability Science.Michiru Nagatsu, Taylor Thiel Davis, C. Tyler DesRoches, Inkeri Koskinen, Miles MacLeod, Milutin Stojanovic & Henrik Thorén - 2020 - Sustainability Science 1 (N/A):1-11.
    Sustainability science seeks to extend scientific investigation into domains characterized by a distinct problem-solving agenda, physical and social complexity, and complex moral and ethical landscapes. In this endeavor it arguably pushes scientific investigation beyond its usual comfort zones, raising fundamental issues about how best to structure such investigation. Philosophers of science have long scrutinized the structure of science and scientific practices, and the conditions under which they operate effectively. We propose a critical engagement between sustainability scientists and philosophers of science (...)
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  47.  41
    Why It's Ok to Be a Gamer.Sarah C. Malanowski & Nicholas R. Baima - 2024 - Routledge.
    If you enjoy video games as a pastime, you are certainly not alone―billions of people worldwide now play video games. However, you may still find yourself reluctant to tell others this fact about yourself. After all, we are routinely warned that video games have the potential to cause addiction and violence. And when we aren’t being warned of their outright harms, we are told we should be doing something better with our time, like going outside, socializing with others, or reading (...)
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  48.  9
    Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal through Sin-sharru-ishkun.Sarah C. Melville & Raija Mattila - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (2):352.
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  49.  22
    Neo-Assyrian Royal Women and Male Identity: Status as a Social Tool.Sarah C. Melville - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (1):37-57.
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  50.  7
    Sargon II, King of Assyria. By Josette Elayi.Sarah C. Melville - 2022 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 141 (2).
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