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Profile: Sarah Chan
  1.  18
    Moral Enhancement and Pro-Social Behaviour.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):130-131.
    Moral enhancement is a topic that has sparked much current interest in the world of bioethics. The possibility of making people ‘better,’ not just in the conventional enhancement sense of improving health and other desirable qualities and capacities, but by making them somehow more moral, more decent, altogether better people, has attracted attention from both advocates 1 2 and sceptics 3 alike. The concept of moral enhancement, however, is fraught with difficult questions, theoretical and practical. What does it actually mean (...)
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  2. In Support of Human Enhancement.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
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  3.  62
    Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle of fairness (...)
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  4.  29
    Does a Fish Need a Bicycle? Animals and Evolution in the Age of Biotechnology.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):484-492.
    Animals, in the age of biotechnology, are the subjects of a myriad of scientific procedures, interventions, and modifications. They are created, altered, and experimented upon—often with highly beneficial outcomes for humans in terms of knowledge gained and applied, yet not without concern also for the effects upon the experimental subjects themselves: consideration of the use of animals in research remains an intensely debated topic. Concerns for animal welfare in scientific research have, however, been primarily directed at harm to and suffering (...)
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  5.  10
    Hidden Anthropocentrism and the “Benefit of the Doubt”: Problems With the “Origins” Approach to Moral Status.Sarah Chan - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):18-20.
  6.  90
    The Concise Argument.Sarah Chan - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):589-589.
    The ethics of psychiatry The ethics of psychiatry is one of the areas of medical ethics where the overlap between medical ethics and philosophy of medicine is largest. This is illustrated by two papers in the current issue of the JME. Charlotte Blease discusses whether it is “… ever right to prescribe placebos to patients in clinical practice?” in the context of prescribing for patients with severe depression . Would such prescriptions for instance amount to morally problematic deception? In an (...)
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  7.  8
    Beyond the Is/Ought Divide: Studying the Nature of the Bioethical Enterprise. [REVIEW]Sarah Chan & John Coggon - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (1):1-5.
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  8.  14
    'Risky' Research and Participants' Interests: The Ethics of Phase 2C Clinical Trials.Sarah Chan, Ying-Kiat Zee, Gordon Jayson & John Harris - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (2):91-96.
    Biomedical research involving human participants is highly regulated and subject to stringent ethical requirements. Clinical research ethics, regulation and policy have tended to focus almost exclusively on the protection of participants' interests against harms that might result from taking part in research. Less consideration, however, has been given to the interests that patients may themselves have in research participation, even in trials that may be beyond the bounds of current clinical research practice. In this paper, we consider the case of (...)
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  9.  1
    Commentary: What Price Freedom?Sarah Chan - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):377-383.
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  10.  1
    Commentary: What Price Freedom?Sarah Chan - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):377-383.
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  11. The Value of Life: An Introduction to Medical Ethics.John Harris & Sarah Chan - 2005 - Routledge.
    First published in 2011. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  12.  13
    Genome Editing Technologies and Human Germline Genetic Modification: The Hinxton Group Consensus Statement.Sarah Chan, Peter J. Donovan, Thomas Douglas, Christopher Gyngell, John Harris, Robin Lovell-Badge, Debra J. H. Mathews & Alan Regenberg - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):42-47.
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  13.  2
    How to Rethink the Fourteen‐Day Rule.Sarah Chan - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (3):5-6.
    Recently, attention has been drawn to the basic principles governing the use of human embryos in research: specifically, the so-called fourteen-day rule. This rule stipulates that human embryos should not be allowed to grow in vitro past fourteen days of development. For years, the fourteen-day limit was largely theoretical, since culture techniques were not sufficient to maintain embryos up to this point. Yet in the past year, research has suggested that growing embryos beyond fourteen days might be feasible and scientifically (...)
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  14.  35
    Consequentialism Without Consequences: Ethics and Embryo Research.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):61.
    The legitimacy of embryo research, use, and destruction is among the most important issues facing contemporary bioethics. In the preceding paper, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu took up an argument of John Harris and tried to find some new ways of avoiding its dramatic consequences. They noted that: “John Harris has argued that if … it is morally permissible to engage in reproduction … despite knowledge that a large number of embryos will fail to implant and quickly die, then … (...)
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  15.  38
    Frozen Embryos, Genetic Information and Reproductive Rights.Sarah Chan & Muireann Quigley - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (8):439–448.
    Recent ethical and legal challenges have arisen concerning the rights of individuals over their IVF embryos, leading to questions about how, when the wishes of parents regarding their embryos conflict, such situations ought to be resolved. A notion commonly invoked in relation to frozen embryo disputes is that of reproductive rights: a right to have (or not to have) children. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean a right to have, or not to have, one's own genetic children. But can (...)
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  16.  3
    Research Translation and Emerging Health Technologies: Synthetic Biology and Beyond.Sarah Chan - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-16.
    New health technologies are rapidly emerging from various areas of bioscience research, such as gene editing, regenerative medicine and synthetic biology. These technologies raise promising medical possibilities but also a range of ethical considerations. Apart from the issues involved in considering whether novel health technologies can or should become part of mainstream medical treatment once established, the process of research translation to develop such therapies itself entails particular ethical concerns. In this paper I use synthetic biology as an example of (...)
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  17.  1
    In Support of Human Enhancement: This Short Comment Presents Arguments in Support of Human Enhancement. What is Enhancement? Surely It is a Procedure That Improves Our Functioning: Any Intervention Which Increases Our General Capabilities for Human Flourishing. We Exclude From Consideration Those Procedures Often Termed "Enhancements" That Are of Dubious Overall Benefit . Equally We Are Not Talking of "Designer" Modifications Which Are More Akin to Aesthetic or Fashion Preferences Than to Improvements: Hair Colour, Eye Colour, or Physique. An Enhancement is Something of Benefit to the Individual. [REVIEW]Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2007 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 1 (1).
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  18.  4
    1.4 Science and the Social Contract: On the Purposes, Uses and Abuses of Science.Sarah Chan, John Harris & John Sulston - forthcoming - Common Knowledge: The Challenge of Transdisciplinarity.
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  19. Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques, Scientific Tourism, and the Global Politics of Science.Sarah Chan, César Palacios‐González & María De Jesús Medina Arellano - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):7-9.
    The United Kingdom is the first and so far only country to pass explicit legislation allowing for the licensed use of the new reproductive technology known as mitochondrial replacement therapy. The techniques used in this technology may prevent the transmission of mitochondrial DNA diseases, but they are controversial because they involve the manipulation of oocytes or embryos and the transfer of genetic material. Some commentators have even suggested that MRT constitutes germline genome modification. All eyes were on the United Kingdom (...)
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  20.  34
    Families – Beyond the Nuclear Ideal.Daniela Cutas & Sarah Chan - 2012 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book examines, through a multi-disciplinary lens, the possibilities offered by relationships and family forms that challenge the nuclear family ideal, and some of the arguments that recommend or disqualify these as legitimate units in our societies. That children should be conceived naturally, born to and raised by their two young, heterosexual, married to each other, genetic parents; that this relationship between parents is also the ideal relationship between romantic or sexual partners; and that romance and sexual intimacy ought to (...)
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