Order:
  1.  4
    ΦΘΟΝΟΣ Δ̓ ΑΠΕΣΤΩ: The Translation of Transgression in Aiskhylos' "Agamemnon".Dylan Sailor & Sarah Culpepper Stroup - 1999 - Classical Antiquity 18 (1):153-182.
    The first half of Aiskhylos' "Agamemnon" presents three crimes of the House of Atreus: the sacrifice of Iphigeneia , the wasting of young Argive lives at Ilion and the treading of the materials as the victorious king reenters his palace . We argue that the sequential presentation of the crimes of the House, which are connected thematically, stylistically, and causally, radically redefines the nature of transgression within contemporary models of the polis community. Crime as defined in relationship to oikos alone (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  4
    Translation as Muse: Poetic Translation in Catullus’s Rome by Elizabeth Marie Young.Sarah Culpepper Stroup - 2017 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 110 (3):432-433.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    ‘When I Read My Cato, It is as If Cato Speaks’: The Birth and Evolution of Cicero’s Dialogic Voice.Sarah Culpepper Stroup - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press.
    Cicero not only wrote dialogues, but was one of the ancient authors most explicitly and consciously interested in the literary issues thrown up by use of the dialogue form. Moreover, his use of, and understanding of, the form developed throughout his literary career. This chapter focusses on the introductions to his dialogues, where Cicero speaks about the literary task of creating and re-creating his authorial voice. In the earlier works, Cicero presents his dialogues as if they were historical events, keeping (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark