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Sarah Horton
Boston College
  1.  18
    Illegible Salvation: The Authority of Language in The Concept of Anxiety.Sarah Horton - 2018 - In Joseph Westfall (ed.), Authorship and Authority in Kierkegaard’s Writings. London, UK: pp. 121-137.
    This essay examines the analysis of language in The Concept of Anxiety and argues that language ultimately reveals itself as both dangerous and salvific. The pseudonymous author, Vigilius Haufniensis, is suspicious of language, for it divides the individual from herself and thereby makes possible the self-forgetfulness of objective chatter. Indeed, this warning (which commenters have tended to follow uncritically) is a legitimate one – yet it fails to grasp that by rendering the self other than itself, language constitutes the self. (...)
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  2.  51
    The Authentic Person’s Limited Bad Faith.Sarah Horton - 2017 - Sartre Studies International 23 (2):82-97.
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  3.  72
    Solidarity and the Absurd in Kamel Daoud's Meursault, Contre-Enquête.Sarah Horton - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):286-303.
    This article examines Kamel Daoud’s treatment of solidarity and the absurd in Meursault, contre-enquête and posits that the question of how to live in solidarity with others is central to the novel, although the word ‘solidarity’ never appears in it. After recalling Camus’s discussion of the absurd in Le Mythe de Sisyphe and of solidarity in L’Homme révolté, the article examines the manner in which Haroun, Daoud’s narrator and the brother of the Arab Meursault killed in L’Étranger, reveals his own (...)
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  4.  29
    The Joy of Desire: Understanding Levinas’s Desire of the Other as Gift.Sarah Horton - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):193-210.
    In this paper, I argue that if we understand Levinas’s Desire of the Other as gift, we can understand it as joyful—that is, as celebratory. After presenting Levinas’s conception of Desire, I consider his claim, found in Otherwise than Being, that the self is a hostage to the Other, and I contend that, paradoxical as it may seem, being a hostage to the Other is actually liberating. Then, drawing on insights Richard Kearney offers in Reimagining the Sacred, I argue for (...)
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  5.  24
    The Influence of the Ōjōyōshū in Late Tenth- and Early Eleventh-Century Japan.Sarah Horton - 2004 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 31 (1):29-54.
  6.  5
    Reviews: Sources of Japanese Tradition, Volume One. [REVIEW]Sarah Horton - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30:166-168.
  7. Review Of: Wm. Theodore deBary Et Al., Comps., Sources of Japanese Tradition, Volume One. [REVIEW]Sarah Horton - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30 (1-2):166-168.
  8. Somatic Desire: Recovering Corporeality in Contemporary Thought.Sarah Horton, Stephen Mendelsohn, Christine Rojcewicz & Richard Kearney (eds.) - 2019 - Lexington Books.
    The essays in this volume all ask what it means for human beings to be embodied as desiring creatures—and perhaps still more piercingly, what it means for a philosopher to be embodied. In taking up this challenge via phenomenology, psychoanalysis, hermeneutics, and the philosophy of literature, the volume questions the orthodoxies not only of Western metaphysics but even of the phenomenological tradition itself. We miss much that has philosophical import when we exclude the somatic aspects of human life, and it (...)
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