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  1.  35
    Inventive Life: Approaches to the New Vitalism.Mariam Fraser, Sarah Kember & Celia Lury (eds.) - 2006 - Sage Publications.
    This book demonstrates how and why vitalism—the idea that life cannot be explained by the principles of mechanism—matters now. Vitalism resists closure and reductionism in the life sciences while simultaneously addressing the object of life itself. The aim of this collection is to consider the questions that vitalism makes it possible to ask: questions about the role and status of life across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities and questions about contingency, indeterminacy, relationality and change. All have special importance now, (...)
  2.  5
    Ubiquitous Photography.Sarah Kember - 2012 - Philosophy of Photography 3 (2):331-348.
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  3.  4
    Metamorphoses.Sarah Kember - 2005 - Theory, Culture and Society 22 (1):153-171.
    This article takes as its starting point and its main problematic the status of evolution as a ‘sterile belief’ in contemporary technoscientific culture. Focusing in particular on the role of evolution across the boundaries of art and science in the contexts of artificial life and transgenic engineering, it offers a critique of the belief in evolutionary possibility as an abstract process. The lack of what François Jacob refers to as a dialogue between the possible and the actual is seen to (...)
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  4.  20
    Cyberfeminism and Artificial Life.Sarah Kember - 2003 - Routledge.
    Cyberfeminism and Artificial Life examines construction, manipulation and re-definition of life in contemporary technoscientific culture. It takes a critical political view of the concept of life as information, tracing this through the new biology and the changing discipline of artificial life and its manifestation in art, language, literature, commerce and entertainment. From cloning to computer games, and incorporating an analysis of hardware, software and 'wetware', Sarah Kember demonstrates how this relatively marginal field connects with, and connects up global networks of (...)
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