Order:
  1.  31
    Inclusion of Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Genetic Research: Advance the Spirit by Changing the Rules?Sarah Knerr, Dawn Wayman & Vence L. Bonham - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):502-512.
    Genetic research aimed at understanding human health and disease is grounded in the study of genetic variation. The inclusion of research subjects with diverse ancestral backgrounds is essential for genetic and genomic research that fully explores human diversity. Large-scale cohort studies and biobanks in Europe and the United States often do not include the breadth of ethnic and racial diversity observed in their countries' citizens. This article explores the findings of a qualitative study of U.S. scientists' understanding and views of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  29
    Giving samples or “getting checked”: measuring conflation of observational biospecimen research and clinical care in Latino communities.Sarah Knerr & Rachel M. Ceballos - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):49.
    Expectations of receiving personal health information as a fringe benefit of biospecimen donation—termed diagnostic misconception—are increasingly documented. We developed an instrument measuring conflation of observational biospecimen-based research and clinical care for use with Latino communities, who may be particularly affected by diagnostic misconception due to limited health care access.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  29
    Inclusion of Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Genetic Research: Advance the Spirit by Changing the Rules?Sarah Knerr, Dawn Wayman & Vence L. Bonham - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):502-512.
    As genetic and genomic research has progressed since the sequencing of the human genome, scientists have continued to struggle to understand the role of genetic and socio-cultural factors in racial and ethnic health disparities. Recognition that race and ethnicity correlate imperfectly with differences in allele frequency, environmental exposures, and significant health outcomes has made framing the relationship between genetic variation, race, ethnicity, and disease one of the most heated debates of the genome era. Because racial and ethnic identities reflect a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations