Results for 'Sarah Read'

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  1.  59
    Mortal Ethics: Reading Levinas with the Dardenne Brothers.Sarah Cooper - 2007 - Film-Philosophy 11 (2):56-87.
    Prior to the productive encounters that can be staged between Emmanuel Levinas’sthought and cinema at the level of reception, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne introducehis philosophy to their filmmaking at its moment of inception.1Luc Dardenne’s diary Audos de nos images documents their filmmaking from 1991 to 2005, and isinterspersed with brief but erudite references to Levinas’s work. While Levinasianthinking is one among many cited influences in this text, which also features quotationsfrom the writings of novelists, poets, and other philosophers, along with (...)
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  2. Reading the Other: Ethics of Encounter.Sarah Allen - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (7):888-899.
    Most scholarly fields, at least in the humanities, have been asking the same questions about the politics of encounter for hundreds of years: Should we try to find a way to encounter an other without appropriating it, without imposing ourselves on it? Is encountering-without-appropriating even possible? These questions are profuse and taken up with intense interest in scholarship about the personal essay, specifically, which has often been credited as a philosophical form. Within debates about the ethics of the personal essay, (...)
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  3.  29
    Reading Performance is Predicted by More Than Phonological Processing.Michelle Y. Kibby, Sylvia E. Lee & Sarah M. Dyer - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  4.  2
    The Primacy of Narrative Agency: Re-Reading Seyla Benhabib on Narrativity.Sarah Drews Lucas - 2018 - Feminist Theory 19 (2):123-143.
    The central claim of this article is that narrative agency, which I will define as a subject’s capacity to make sense of herself as an ‘I’ over time and in relation to other ‘I’s, is a precondition for identity formation. I engage with two critiques of this claim: first, that narrative agency is limited by, rather than primary to, subordinating gender norms and, second, that a view of narrative agency as primary is committed to too ambitious a conception of the (...)
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  5.  1
    In Defense of Reading.Sarah E. Worth - 2017 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    In this fascinating book, Sarah Worth addresses from a philosophical perspective the many ways in which reading benefits us morally, socially and cognitively.
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  6. "The Psychology of Compassion: A Reading of City of God 9.5".Sarah Byers - 2012 - In James Wetzel (ed.), Augustine's City of God: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 130-148.
    Writing to the young emperor Nero, Seneca elaborates a sophisticated distinction between compassion and mercy for use in forensic contexts, agreeing with earlier Stoics that compassion is a vice, but adding that there is a virtue called mercy or 'clemency.' This Stoic repudiation of compassion has won the attention of Nussbaum, who argues that it was motivated by a respect for persons as dignified agents, and was of a piece with the Stoics' cosmopolitanism. This chapter engages Nussbaum's presentation of the (...)
     
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  7.  19
    Sarah E. Worth, In Defence of Reading. Reviewed By.Kalle Puolakka - 2018 - Philosophy in Review 38 (1):42-44.
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  8.  6
    Reading Stein—Some Guidelines for the Perplexed: A Review of Edith Stein by Sarah Borden and of Edith Stein: A Philosophical Prologue, 1913–1922 by Alasdair Macintyre. [REVIEW]Mette Lebech - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):103-112.
  9. Re-Reading Irigaray's Spinoza.Sarah Donovan - 2009 - In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  10.  3
    Reading: How Readers Beget Imagining.Sarah Bro Trasmundi & Stephen J. Cowley - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  11.  6
    Must Reading Sarah Wood, Derrida's Writing and Difference: A Reader's Guide , 192 Pp. ISBN: 978–0826491916. [REVIEW]Thomas Dutoit - 2013 - Oxford Literary Review 35 (1):119-127.
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  12.  13
    Sarah Wood, Without Mastery: Reading and Other Forces.Timothy Morton - 2017 - Oxford Literary Review 39 (1):135-141.
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  13.  8
    Reading Signs.Sarah E. Gustafson - 1989 - Semiotics:68-76.
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  14.  14
    Surface Reading And The Symptom That Is Only Skin-deepThe Way We Read Now, Edited by Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best with Emily Apter and Elaine Freedgood. Special Issue ofRepresentations, 108:1 , 1–148.Anne Anlin Cheng,Second Skin. Josephine Baker and the Modern Surface, 234 Pp.Thinking Through the Skin, Edited by Sara Ahmed and Jackie Stacey , 241 Pp.Steven Connor,The Book of Skin, 304 Pp.Naomi Segal,Consensuality. Didier Anzieu, Gender and the Sense of Touch, 286 Pp. [REVIEW]Sarah Kay - 2012 - Paragraph 35 (3):451-459.
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  15.  13
    WORTH, SARAH E. In Defense of Reading. London: Rowan and Littlefield International, 2017, Xviii + 221 Pp., $39.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Stephanie Patridge - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (3):359-362.
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  16.  1
    Ethics and Values in Social Work.Sarah Banks - 2006 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The third edition of this popular book has been updated to take account of the latest developments in policy and social work practice. It includes new sections on radical/emancipatory and postmodern approaches to ethics, analysis of the latest codes of ethics from over 30 different countries, additional case studies of ethical problems and dilemmas, practical exercises, and annotated further reading lists at the end of each chapter.
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  17.  10
    “I Can Read These Colors.” Orthographic Manipulations and the Development of the Color-Word Stroop.Marie Arsalidou, Alba Agostino, Sarah Maxwell & Margot J. Taylor - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  18.  8
    State Maternalism: Rethinking Anarchist Readings of the Daodejing.Sarah Flavel & Brad Hall - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (3):353-369.
    In this article we review Western discourse on the relationship between Daoism and anarchist political theory. In particular, we focus on the anarchist reading of Daoism given by Roger Ames, and the more recent contrasting argument against reading Daoism as an anarchism by Alex Feldt. Centering our discussion on the Daodejing 道德經, we argue that, on the one hand, Laozi’s 老子 political theory is less easily reconcilable with anarchist thinking than Ames suggests. On the other hand, we dispute Feldt’s argument (...)
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  19.  5
    Siren Enchantments, or, Reading Sound in Medieval Books.Sarah Kay - 2020 - Substance 49 (2):108-132.
    Scholars of the Middle Ages are reflecting productively on the sound not only of the text, but of the book.1 Formed from the skins of dead animals, parchment pages have a positive and intimate bond with silence in a way that paper does not. And yet the same or similar animal membranes are used for drum skins, tambourines, or the bellows of bagpipes, while the body of the human reader, enveloped in a skin that closely resembles parchment and is near (...)
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  20.  13
    ‘When I Read My Cato, It is as If Cato Speaks’: The Birth and Evolution of Cicero’s Dialogic Voice.Sarah Culpepper Stroup - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press.
    Cicero not only wrote dialogues, but was one of the ancient authors most explicitly and consciously interested in the literary issues thrown up by use of the dialogue form. Moreover, his use of, and understanding of, the form developed throughout his literary career. This chapter focusses on the introductions to his dialogues, where Cicero speaks about the literary task of creating and re-creating his authorial voice. In the earlier works, Cicero presents his dialogues as if they were historical events, keeping (...)
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  21. Weakness of Will and Practical Irrationality.Sarah Stroud & Christine Tappolet (eds.) - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Among the many practical failures that threaten us, weakness of will or akrasia is often considered to be a paradigm of irrationality. The eleven new essays in this collection, written by an excellent international team of philosophers, some well-established, some younger scholars, give a rich overview of the current debate over weakness of will and practical irrationality more generally. Issues covered include classical questions such as the distinction between weakness and compulsion, the connection between evaluative judgement and motivation, the role (...)
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  22.  21
    Practical Induction.Sarah Buss - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):571.
    I wish more books of philosophy were like this one. It is elegantly written. It is filled with provocative claims and ingenious arguments. It is a really good read, even while it forces us to rethink many of our assumptions about practical reason and practical reasoning, morality and agency.
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  23.  38
    Susan L. Feagin: Reading with Feeling: The Aesthetics of Appreciation.Sarah E. Worth & Jennifer McMahon Railey - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (4):579-581.
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  24.  4
    Homo Sum: John Adams Reads Terence.Sarah A. Rous - 2020 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (3):299-334.
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  25.  94
    The Left Vienna Circle, Part 1. Carnap, Neurath, and the Left Vienna Circle Thesis.Sarah S. Richardson - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):14-24.
    Recent scholarship resuscitates the history and philosophy of a ‘left wing’ in the Vienna Circle, offering a counterhistory to the conventional image of analytic philosophy as politically conformist. This paper disputes the historical claim that early logical empiricists developed a political philosophy of science. Though some individuals in the Vienna Circle, including Rudolf Carnap and Otto Neurath, believed strongly in the importance of science to social progress, they did not construct a political philosophy of science. Both Carnap and Neurath were (...)
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  26.  79
    Philosophy of Action: A Contemporary Introduction.Sarah Paul - 2020 - Routledge.
    This book offers an accessible and inclusive overview of the major debates in the philosophy of action. It covers the distinct approaches taken by Donald Davidson, G.E.M. Anscombe, and numerous others to answering questions like "what are intentional actions?" and "how do reasons explain actions?" Further topics include intention, practical knowledge, weakness and strength of will, self-governance, and collective agency. With introductions, conclusions, and annotated suggested reading lists for each of the ten chapters, it is an ideal introduction for advanced (...)
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  27.  10
    The Eyes Know What You Are Thinking: Eye Movements as an Objective Measure of Mind Wandering.Sarah Uzzaman & Steve Joordens - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1882-1886.
    Paralleling the recent work by Reichle, Reineberg, and Schooler , we explore the use of eye movements as an objective measure of mind wandering while participants performed a reading task. Participants were placed in a self-classified probe-caught mind wandering paradigm while their eye movements were recorded. They were randomly probed every 2–3 min and were required to indicate whether their mind had been wandering. The results show that eye movements were generally less complex when participants reported mind wandering episodes, with (...)
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  28. The Symposia Read at the Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association at University of Aberdeen July 2008.Sarah Broadie (ed.) - 2008 - Aristotelian Society.
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  29.  14
    Commentary on ‘Moral Reasons to Edit the Human Genome’: This is Not the Moral Imperative We Are Looking For.Sarah Chan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):528-529.
    After reading Savulescu and colleagues,1 one ought to be in no doubt that human heritable genome editing is a ‘moral imperative’: to cure disease, reduce inequalities, improve public health and protect future generations. They make this argument repeatedly and in no uncertain terms. Yet are they right to do so? I am certainly not against developing HGE or exploring its possibilities. Instead, I aim to sound a cautionary note in relation to claims about its technological potential and how we frame (...)
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  30.  28
    “Keeping It in the Family”: Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman.Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.
    This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings on Nietzsche (...)
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  31.  13
    Role-Playing in Antigone and Africa: Can We Read Sophocles Through Sizwe?Sarah H. Nooter - 2013 - Arion 21 (2):11-47.
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  32.  22
    New Waves in Philosophy of Language.Sarah Sawyer (ed.) - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    A collection of papers to illustrate new waves in Philosophy of Language: -/- "Linguistic Puzzles and Semantic Pretence" by B. Armour-Garb & J. Woodbridge; "Minimal Semantics and the Nature of Psychological Evidence" by E. Borg; "A Naturalistic Approach to the Philosophy of Language" by J. Collins; "In Praise of our Linguistic Intuitions" by A. Everett; "Phenomenal Continua and Secondary Properties" by P. Greenough; "Semantic Oughts in Context" by A. Hattiangadi; "Content Force and Semantic Norms" by M. Kolbel; "Linguistic Competence and (...)
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  33.  14
    Nicomachean Ethics: Translation, Introduction, Commentary.Sarah Broadie & Christopher Rowe (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    line-by-line notes are invariably informative and helpful, as well thought-provoking.' John M. Cooper, Stuart Professor of Philosophy, Princeton UniversityIn a new English translation by Christopher Rowe, this great classic of moral philosophy is accompanied here by an extended introduction and detailed lin-by-line commentary by Sarah Broadie. Assuming no knowledge of Greek, her scholarly and instructive approach will prove invaluable for students reading the text for the first time. This thorough treatment of Aristotle's text will be an indispensable resource for (...)
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  34.  31
    Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics: Translation, Introduction, Commentary.Sarah Broadie & Christopher Rowe (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    In a new English translation by Christopher Rowe, this great classic of moral philosophy is accompanied here by an extended introduction and detailed lin-by-line commentary by Sarah Broadie. Assuming no knowledge of Greek, her scholarly and instructive approach will prove invaluable for students reading the text for the first time. This thorough treatment of Aristotle's text will be an indispensable resource for students, teachers, and scholars alike.
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  35. Letting (H)Anna Speak: An Intertextual Reading of the New Testament Prophetess.Sarah Harris - 2018 - Feminist Theology 27 (1):60-74.
    The story of Anna is a brief description of a faithful prophetess which is consciously paired with the previous and more developed narrative of Simeon. Hannah’s story is significant to the Lukan Gospel and yet her voice, which men and women visiting the temple heard repeatedly, is not articulated by Luke. She has been the topic of much research, in as much as three verses in their context can provide, while no one has sought to let Hannah speak for herself. (...)
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  36. Magic in Sartre's Early Philosophy.Sarah Richmond - 2010 - In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.
     
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  37.  25
    Salving the Phenomena of Mind: Energy, Hegemonikon, and Sympathy in Cudworth.Sarah Hutton - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):465-486.
    Ralph Cudworth’s theory of mind was the most fully developed philosophical psychology among the Cambridge Platonists. Like his seventeenth-century contemporaries, Cudworth discussed mental powers in terms of soul rather than mind and considered the function of the soul to be not merely intellectual, but vital and moral. Cudworth conceived the soul as a single self-determining unit which combined many powers. He developed this against a philosophical agenda set by Descartes and Hobbes. But he turned to ancient philosophy, especially the philosophy (...)
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  38.  27
    Visual Processing in Reading Disorders and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and its Contribution to Basic Reading Ability.Michelle Y. Kibby, Sarah M. Dyer, Sarah A. Vadnais, Audreyana C. Jagger, Gabriel A. Casher & Maria Stacy - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  39.  17
    The Troubadour Lyric: A Psychocritical Reading.Rouben C. Cholakian.Sarah Spence - 1993 - Speculum 68 (1):125-127.
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  40.  15
    Hollie L. S. Morgan, Beds and Chambers in Late Medieval England: Readings, Representations and Realities. Woodbridge, UK: York Medieval Press in Association with Boydell, 2017. Pp. Xii, 254; 19 Color Figures. $99. ISBN: 978-1-903153-71-0. [REVIEW]Sarah Stanbury - 2019 - Speculum 94 (2):567-569.
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  41.  2
    Christina Lupton. Reading and the Making of Time in the Eighteenth Century. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018. 216 Pp. [REVIEW]Sean Silver & Sarah Van Cleve - 2020 - Critical Inquiry 46 (3):713-714.
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  42.  36
    Humanising Illness: Presenting Health Information in Educational Comics.Sarah McNicol - 2014 - Medical Humanities 40 (1):49-55.
    Research into the effectiveness of comic books as health education tools overwhelmingly consists of studies evaluating the information learnt as a result of reading the comic, for example using preintervention and postintervention questionnaires. In essence, these studies evaluate comics in the same way in which a patient information leaflet might be evaluated, but they fail to evaluate the narrative element of comics. Health information comics have the potential to do much more than simply convey facts about an illness; they can (...)
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  43. Zizek: A Critical Introduction.Sarah Kay - 2003 - Distributed in the Usa by Blackwell.
    Introduction: Thinking, writing, and reading about the real -- Dialectic and the real : Lacan, Hegel, and the alchemy of après-coup -- 'Reality' and the real : culture as anamorphosis -- The real of sexual difference : imagining, thinking, being -- Ethics and the real : the ungodly virtues of psychoanalysis -- Politics, or, the art of the impossible.
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  44.  21
    From 'Public Service' to Artificial Insemination: Animal Breeding Science and Reproductive Research in Early Twentieth-Century Britain.Sarah Wilmot - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (2):411-441.
    Artificial insemination was the first conceptive technology to be widely used in agriculture. Whereas at the beginning of the twentieth century all cows in England and Wales were mated to bulls, by the end of the 1950s 60% conceived through artificial insemination. By then a national network of ‘cattle breeding centres’ brought AI within the reach of every farmer. In this paper I explore how artificial insemination, which had few supporters in the 1920s and 1930s, was transformed into an ‘indispensable’ (...)
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  45.  30
    On 'Rectifying' Rectification: Reconsidering Zhengming in Light of Confucian Role Ethics.Sarah A. Mattice - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (3):247-260.
    Both an emphasis on logic and an emphasis on rhetoric lead to a kind of care for language. However, in early Greece this care for language through the lens of logic manifested in the drive to ?get it right?, whereas in early China the care for language manifested in the pervasive concern for zhengming, for using names properly. For the early Chinese thinkers, especially the early Confucians, this was not predominantly a linguistic affair?zhengming is a key component of moral cultivation. (...)
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  46.  19
    Do Volunteers in Schools Help Children Learn to Read? A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials.Carole J. Torgerson, Sarah E. King & Amanda J. Sowden - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (4):433-444.
    The aim of unpaid volunteer classroom assistants is to give extra support to children learning to read. The impact of using volunteers to improve children's acquisition of reading skills is unknown. To assess whether volunteers are effective in improving children's reading, we undertook a systematic review of all relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). An exhaustive search of all the main electronic databases was carried out (i.e. BEI, PsycInfo, ASSIA, PAIS, SSCI, ERIC, SPECTR, SIGLE). We identified eight experimental studies, of (...)
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  47.  34
    Camera Obscura: Of Ideology.Sarah Kofman - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
    In her opening chapter on Marx, Kofman provides a reading of inversion as necessary to the ideological process. She then explores the metaphor of the camera obscura in Freud's description of the unconscious.
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  48.  33
    I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy.Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    'I know what you're thinking' is a fascinating exploration into the neuroscientific evidence on 'mind reading'.
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  49.  82
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology.Sarah Robins, John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology, Second Edition_ is an invaluable guide and major reference source to the major topics, problems, concepts and debates in philosophy of psychology and is the first companion of its kind. A team of renowned international contributors provide forty-nine chapters organised into six clear parts: Historical background to Philosophy of Psychology Psychological Explanation Cognition and Representation The biological basis of psychology Perceptual Experience Personhood. _The Companion_ covers key topics such as the origins of experimental (...)
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  50.  99
    Toward Social Reform: Kant's Penal Theory Reinterpreted.Sarah Williams Holtman - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):3-21.
    Here I set the stage for developing a Kantian account of punishment attuned to social and economic injustice and to the need for prison reform. I argue that we cannot appreciate Kant's own discussion of punishment unless we read it in light of the theory of justice of which it is a part and the fundamental commitments of that theory to freedom, autonomy and equality. As important, we cannot properly evaluate Kant's advocacy of the law of retribution unless we (...)
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