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  1.  11
    Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    "--Everett K. Rowson, New York University"This is a serious piece of scholarship filled with many very fine insights.
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  2.  38
    Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn Al-Rāwandī, Abū Bakr Al-Rāzī, and Their Impact on Islamic Thought.Thérèse-Anne Druart & Sarah Stroumsa - 2001 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (1):99.
  3.  78
    Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn Al-Rāwandī, Abū Bakr Al-Rāzī, and Their Impact on Islamic Thought.Sarah Stroumsa - 1999 - Brill.
    This book studies the phenomenon of freethinking in medieval Islam, as exemplified in the figures of Ibn al-Rāwandī and Abū Bakr al-Rāzī. It reconstructs their thought and analyzes the relations of the phenomenon to Islamic prophetology and its repercussions in Islamic thought.
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  4.  45
    Al-Fārābī and Maimonides on Medicine as a Science.Sarah Stroumsa - 1993 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 3 (2):235.
    In his commentary on the first Aphorism of Hippocrates Maimonides lists the seven parts of medicine. Scholars have studied the relation of this text to the work of al-Fārābī. In particular, they have focused on the Iḥṣāʼ al-ʼulῡm, which in its present form does not contain a discussion of medicine, and on al-Fārābīʼs Risāla fi al-ţibb. The article examines the medieval Hebrew versions of the Iḥṣāʼ al-ʽūlum. On the basis of these versions, it is argued that there existed a version (...)
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  5.  40
    The Blinding Emerald: Ibn Al-Rāwandī's Kitāb Al-ZumurrudThe Blinding Emerald: Ibn Al-Rawandi's Kitab Al-Zumurrud.Sarah Stroumsa, Ibn al-Rāwandī & Ibn al-Rawandi - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (2):163.
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  6.  7
    Al-Fārābī and Maimonides on the Christian Philosophical Tradition: A Re-Evaluation.Sarah Stroumsa - 1991 - Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 68 (2):263-287.
  7. Saadya and Jewish Kalam.Sarah Stroumsa - 2003 - In Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 121--46.
  8.  1
    Index.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 219-222.
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  9.  28
    From Muslim Heresy to Jewish-Muslim Polemics: Ibn Al-Rāwandī's Kitāb Al-DāmighFrom Muslim Heresy to Jewish-Muslim Polemics: Ibn Al-Rawandi's Kitab Al-Damigh.Sarah Stroumsa, Ibn al-Rāwandī & Ibn al-Rawandi - 1987 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 107 (4):767.
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  10.  18
    The Polemic of Nestor the Priest, Qiṣṣat Mujādalat Al-Usquf and Sefer Nestor Ha-Komer: Introduction, Annotated Translations, and CommentaryThe Polemic of Nestor the Priest, Qissat Mujadalat Al-Usquf and Sefer Nestor Ha-Komer: Introduction, Annotated Translations, and Commentary.John C. Reeves, Daniel J. Lasker & Sarah Stroumsa - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (2):346.
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  11. Dāwūd Ibn Marwān Al-Muqammis's Twenty Chapters (ʻishrūn Maqāla).Sarah Stroumsa - 1989 - E.J. Brill.
     
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  12.  18
    “Wondrous Paths”: The Ismāʿīlī Context of Saadya’s ‘Commentary onSefer Yeṣira’.Sarah Stroumsa - 2015 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 18 (1):74-90.
    The Commentary on Sefer Yeṣira, with its pronounced Pythagorean and Neo-Platonic overtones, written by Saadya Gaon in 931, stands out among the other writings of this Jewish theologian, and raises the question of the purpose of its composition. It has been argued that in writing a commentary on this work of letter-speculation, Saadya responded to mythical and mystical trends in tenth-century Judaism, endeavoring to recast this foundational mystical text as a work of rational philosophy. The present article argues that Saadya (...)
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  13.  14
    The Wellsprings of Wisdom: A Study of Abū Yaʿqūb Al-Sijistānī's Kitāb Al-Yanābīʿ Including a Complete English Translation with Commentary and Notes on the Arabic TextThe Wellsprings of Wisdom: A Study of Abu Yaqub Al-Sijistani's Kitab Al-Yanabi Including a Complete English Translation with Commentary and Notes on the Arabic Text.Sarah Stroumsa & Paul E. Walker - 1997 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 117 (1):186.
  14.  10
    Empedocles Arabus: Une Lecture Neoplatonicenne Tardive.Sarah Stroumsa & Daniel de Smet - 2002 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 122 (1):94.
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  15.  10
    The Medieval Hebrew Encyclopedias of Science and Philosophy: Proceedings of the Bar-Ilan University Conference.Sarah Stroumsa & Steven Harvey - 2003 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (2):450.
  16.  8
    Early Philosophical Shiism: The Neoplatonism of Abū Yaʿqūb Al-SijistānīEarly Philosophical Shiism: The Neoplatonism of Abu Yaqub Al-Sijistani.Sarah Stroumsa & Paul E. Walker - 1995 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 115 (3):498.
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  17.  9
    Compassion for Wisdom.Sarah Stroumsa - 1996 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 1 (1):39-55.
    In studying the attitude of medieval philosophers towards the act of writing, scholars have tended to concentrate on their esoteric tendencies and their reluctance to commit philosophy to writing. The basic attitude of medieval philosophers to the decision to commit something to writing, whether it be that made by the prophets, the sages or the medieval philosophers themselves, however, is on the whole positive. This article examines the sources - both religious and philosophical - from which this positive attitude stems (...)
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  18.  3
    Chapter One. Maimonides and Mediterranean Culture.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 1-23.
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  19.  3
    Chapter Six. “From Moses to Moses”: Maimonides’ Vision of Perfection.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 153-188.
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  20.  2
    Acknowledgments.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press.
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  21.  2
    Abbreviations.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press.
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  22.  2
    Bibliography.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 193-218.
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  23.  2
    Conclusion.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 189-192.
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  24.  2
    Chapter Four. La Longue Durée: Maimonides as a Phenomenologist of Religion.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 84-124.
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  25.  2
    Chapter Three. An Almohad “Fundamentalist”?Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 53-83.
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  26.  1
    Chapter Five. A Critical Mind: Maimonides as Scientist.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 125-152.
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  27.  1
    Chapter Two. The Theological Context of Maimonides’ Thought.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press. pp. 24-52.
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  28.  1
    Preface.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - In Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker. Princeton University Press.
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  29. Maimonides in His World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker.Sarah Stroumsa - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    While the great medieval philosopher, theologian, and physician Maimonides is acknowledged as a leading Jewish thinker, his intellectual contacts with his surrounding world are often described as related primarily to Islamic philosophy. Maimonides in His World challenges this view by revealing him to have wholeheartedly lived, breathed, and espoused the rich Mediterranean culture of his time.Sarah Stroumsa argues that Maimonides is most accurately viewed as a Mediterranean thinker who consistently interpreted his own Jewish tradition in contemporary multicultural terms. Maimonides spent (...)
     
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