Results for 'Sarah Wakefield'

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  1.  11
    Indirect Reports and Pragmatics in the World Languages.Alessandro Capone, Una Stojnic, Ernie Lepore, Denis Delfitto, Anne Reboul, Gaetano Fiorin, Kenneth A. Taylor, Jonathan Berg, Herbert L. Colston, Sanford C. Goldberg, Edoardo Lombardi Vallauri, Cliff Goddard, Anna Wierzbicka, Magdalena Sztencel, Sarah E. Duffy, Alessandra Falzone, Paola Pennisi, Péter Furkó, András Kertész, Ágnes Abuczki, Alessandra Giorgi, Sona Haroutyunian, Marina Folescu, Hiroko Itakura, John C. Wakefield, Hung Yuk Lee, Sumiyo Nishiguchi, Brian E. Butler, Douglas Robinson, Kobie van Krieken, José Sanders, Grazia Basile, Antonino Bucca, Edoardo Lombardi Vallauri & Kobie van Krieken (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
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  2.  88
    Edible Backyards: A Qualitative Study of Household Food Growing and its Contributions to Food Security. [REVIEW]Robin Kortright & Sarah Wakefield - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):39-53.
    Food security is a fundamental element of community health. Informal house-lot food growing, by providing convenient access to diverse varieties of affordable and nutritious produce, can provide an important support for community food security. In this exploratory assessment of the contribution home food gardening makes to community food security, in-depth interviews were conducted with gardeners in two contrasting neighborhoods in Toronto, Canada. A typology of food gardeners was developed, and this qualitative understanding of residential food production was then assessed from (...)
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  3.  56
    The Biostatistical Theory Versus the Harmful Dysfunction Analysis, Part 1: Is Part-Dysfunction a Sufficient Condition for Medical Disorder?Jerome Wakefield - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (6):648-682.
    Christopher Boorse’s biostatistical theory of medical disorder claims that biological part-dysfunction (i.e., failure of an internal mechanism to perform its biological function), a factual criterion, is both necessary and sufficient for disorder. Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder agrees that part-dysfunction is necessary but rejects the sufficiency claim, maintaining that disorder also requires that the part-dysfunction causes harm to the individual, a value criterion. In this paper, I present two considerations against the sufficiency claim. First, I analyze (...)
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  4.  5
    Harm as a Necessary Component of the Concept of Medical Disorder: Reply to Muckler and Taylor.Jerome C. Wakefield & Jordan A. Conrad - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):350-370.
    Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis asserts that the concept of medical disorder includes a naturalistic component of dysfunction and a value component, both of which are required for disorder attributions. Muckler and Taylor, defending a purely naturalist, value-free understanding of disorder, argue that harm is not necessary for disorder. They provide three examples of dysfunctions that, they claim, are considered disorders but are entirely harmless: mild mononucleosis, cowpox that prevents smallpox, and minor perceptual deficits. They also reject the proposal that (...)
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  5.  14
    Does the Harm Component of the Harmful Dysfunction Analysis Need Rethinking?: Reply to Powell and Scarffe.Jerome C. Wakefield & Jordan A. Conrad - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):594-596.
    In ‘Rethinking Disease’, Powell and Scarffe1 propose what in effect is a modification of Jerome Wakefield’s2 3 harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder. The HDA maintains that ‘disorder’ is a hybrid factual and value concept requiring that a biological dysfunction, understood as a failure of some feature to perform a naturally selected function, causes harm to the individual as evaluated by social values. Powell and Scarffe accept both the HDA’s evolutionary biological function component and its incorporation of a value (...)
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  6.  14
    Giovanni Gentile as Moral Philosopher.J. Wakefield - 2014 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):73-103.
    This essay assesses Gentile's contributions to practical philosophy, showing how a distinctive but idiosyncratic moral theory emerges over the course of his systematic works. Wakefield argues that Gentile's thoroughgoing anti-realism does not, as some critics have thought, leave him unable to distinguish reasonable from unreasonable arguments or good from bad reasons for action. While actual idealism veers too close to implausible relativism to have much use as an all-purpose philosophical outlook, argues Wakefield, it retains real power as a (...)
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  7. An Introduction to Botany: In a Series of Familiar Letters, with Illustrative Engravings.Priscilla Wakefield - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Coming from a prosperous London Quaker family, the author Priscilla Wakefield wrote educational books for children, and one work for adults, Reflections on the Present Condition of the Female Sex, also reissued in this series. This 1796 book on botany, a science which 'contributes to health of body and cheerfulness of disposition' but is difficult to study because of its Latin nomenclature and the cost of textbooks, offers a simple introduction for children through the medium of letters between sisters, (...)
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  8. Intentionality and the Phenomenology of Action.Jerome C. Wakefield & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1991 - In Ernest Lepore & Robert Van Gulick (eds.), John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  9. What Makes a Mental Disorder Mental?Jerome C. Wakefield - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):123-131.
  10. Broad Versus Narrow Content in the Explanation of Action: Fodor on Frege Cases.Jerome C. Wakefield - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (2):119-33.
    A major obstacle to formulating a broad-content intentional psychology is the occurrence of ''Frege cases'' - cases in which a person apparently believes or desires Fa but not Fb and acts accordingly, even though "a" and "b" have the same broad content. Frege cases seem to demand narrow-content distinctions to explain actions by the contents of beliefs and desires. Jerry Fodor ( The elm and the expert: Mentalese and its semantics , Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1994) argues that an explanatorily (...)
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  11.  63
    Mental Disorder and Moral Responsibility: Disorders of Personhood as Harmful Dysfunctions, With Special Reference to Alcoholism.Jerome C. Wakefield - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):91-99.
  12. The Chinese Room Argument Reconsidered: Essentialism, Indeterminacy, and Strong AI. [REVIEW]Jerome C. Wakefield - 2003 - Minds and Machines 13 (2):285-319.
    I argue that John Searle's (1980) influential Chinese room argument (CRA) against computationalism and strong AI survives existing objections, including Block's (1998) internalized systems reply, Fodor's (1991b) deviant causal chain reply, and Hauser's (1997) unconscious content reply. However, a new ``essentialist'' reply I construct shows that the CRA as presented by Searle is an unsound argument that relies on a question-begging appeal to intuition. My diagnosis of the CRA relies on an interpretation of computationalism as a scientific theory about the (...)
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  13.  17
    Protogaea.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Claudine Cohen & Andre Wakefield - 2008 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  14. False Positives in Psychiatric Diagnosis: Implications for Human Freedom.Jerome C. Wakefield - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):5-17.
    Current symptom-based DSM and ICD diagnostic criteria for mental disorders are prone to yielding false positives because they ignore the context of symptoms. This is often seen as a benign flaw because problems of living and emotional suffering, even if not true disorders, may benefit from support and treatment. However, diagnosis of a disorder in our society has many ramifications not only for treatment choice but for broader social reactions to the diagnosed individual. In particular, mental disorders impose a sick (...)
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  15.  56
    Fodor on Inscrutability.Jerome C. Wakefield - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (5):524-537.
    : Jerry Fodor proposes a solution to Quine's inscrutability–of–reference problem for certain naturalized semantic theories, thereby defending such theories from charges that they cannot discriminate meanings finely enough. His proposal, combining elements of informational and inferential–role semantics, is to eliminate non–standard interpretations by testing predicate compatibility relations. I argue that Fodor's proposal, understood as primarily aimed at Mentalese, withstands Ray's and Gates's objections but nonetheless fails because of unwarranted assumptions about ontological homogeneity of target language predicates, and problems with Fodor's (...)
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  16. Why Instinctual Impulses Can't Be Unconscious: An Exploration of Freud's Cognitivism.Jerome C. Wakefield - 1990 - Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought 13:265-88.
  17.  38
    Why Specific Design is Not the Mark of the Adaptational.Jerome C. Wakefield - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):532-533.
    Andrews et al.'s analysis suffers from a series of conceptual confusions they inherit from Gould's work. Their proposal that adaptations can be distinguished from exaptations essentially by specific design criteria fails because exaptations are often maintained and secondarily adapted by natural selection and therefore, over evolutionary time, can come to have similar levels of design specificity to adaptations.
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  18.  33
    Steven K. Strange 1950‐2009.Kevin Corrigan, Richard Patterson, Garth Tissol, Peter Wakefield & Jack Zupko - 2010 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (1):1-3.
  19.  33
    High Mental Disorder Rates Are Based on Invalid Measures: Questions About the Claimed Ubiquity of Mutation-Induced Dysfunction.Jerome C. Wakefield - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):424-426.
    Three reservations about Keller & Miller's (K&M's) argument are explored: Serious validity problems afflict epidemiological criteria discriminating disorders from non-disorders, so high rates may be misleading. Normal variation need not be mild disorder, contrary to a possible interpretation of K&M's article. And, rather than mutation-selection balance, true disorders may result from unselected combinations of normal variants over many loci. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  20.  25
    VIastos on the Unity of Virtue: Why Pauline Predication Will Not Save the Biconditionality Thesis.Jerome C. Wakefield - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):47-65.
  21. Why Emotions Can't Be Unconscious: An Exploration of Freud's Essentialism.Jerome C. Wakefield - 1991 - Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought 14:29-67.
  22.  9
    Why Justice and Holiness Are Similar: Pro Tago Ras 330-331.Jerome Wakefield - 1987 - Phronesis 32 (1):267-276.
  23.  8
    Class in the Classroom: Engaging Hidden Identities.Peter W. Wakefield - 2001 - Metaphilosophy 32 (4):427-447.
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  24. "A Great Championess for Her Sex": Sarah Chapone on Liberty as Nondomination and Self-Mastery.Jacqueline Broad - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):77-88.
    This paper examines the concept of liberty at the heart of Sarah Chapone’s 1735 work, The Hardships of the English Laws in Relation to Wives. In this work, Chapone (1699-1764) advocates an ideal of freedom from domination that closely resembles the republican ideal in seventeenth and eighteenth- century England. This is the idea that an agent is free provided that no-one else has the power to dispose of that agent’s property—her “life, liberty, and limb” and her material possessions—according to (...)
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  25. Conceptual Analysis Versus Scientific Understanding: An Assessment of Wakefield's Folk Psychiatry.Dominic Murphy & Robert L. Woolfolk - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):271-293.
    Wakefield's (2000) responses to our paper herein (Murphy and Woolfolk 2000) are not only unsuccessful, they force him into a position that leaves him unable to preserve any distinction between disorders and other problems. They also conflate distinct scientific concepts of function. Further, Wakefield fails to show that ascriptions of human dysfunction do not ineliminably involve values. -/- We suggest Wakefield is analyzing a concept that plays a role in commonsense thought and arguing that the task of (...)
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  26. Sex, Social Purity and Sarah Grand.Ann Heilmann & Stephanie Forward (eds.) - 2000 - Routledge.
    Sarah Grand was one of the most prominent New Women of the 1890s and a notable social purity feminist and suffragist. This collection offers important insights into the full range of her journalistic output and lesser-known fictional writings. It also makes available biographical and autobiographical material, and previously unpublished manuscript sources. The first volume reproduces Grand's articles and the contemporary critical reception of her work. The letters in volume two, written mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, shed light on (...)
     
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  27.  9
    In Praise of Sarah Richmond's Translation of L'Être Et le Néant.Matthew C. Eshleman - 2020 - Sartre Studies International 26 (1):1-15.
    This article surveys most of the recent reviews of Sarah Richmond’s excellent new translation of L’Être et le néant. It offers some close textual comparisons between Richmond’s translation, Hazel Barnes’ translation, and the Checklist of Errors of Hazel Barnes’ Translation of L’Être et le néant. This article concludes that Richmond delivers a higher semantic resolution translation that overcomes nearly all the liabilities found in Barnes and does so without sacrificing much by way of readability.
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  28.  71
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to More? By Sarah Conly.Travis N. Rieder - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):29-34.
    There are too many people on the planet. This isn’t a popular thing to say, but it’s becoming more and more obvious that it’s true, and that we need to do something to address it. Even in our radically unjust world, where billions of people do not have adequate access to food, water, energy, and other resources, we’re still living unsustainably—overcharging our ecological credit card and torching the climate. But discussing the link between these environmental problems and the population is (...)
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  29.  72
    Being and Nothingness: An Essay in Phenomenological Ontology, by Jean-Paul Sartre, Translated by Sarah Richmond. [REVIEW]Jonathan Webber - 2020 - Mind 129 (513):332-339.
    Being and Nothingness: An Essay in Phenomenological Ontology, by SartreJean-Paul, translated by Sarah Richmond. Abingdon: Routledge, 2018. Pp. xlvii + 848.
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  30.  6
    Sarah Richmond’s Translation of Jean-Paul Sartre’s Being and Nothingness.Adrian van den Hoven - 2020 - Sartre Studies International 26 (1):16-28.
    Sarah Richmond’s translation makes an important contribution to Sartrean scholarship. L’Etre et le néant was first translated by Hazel Barnes in 1956 but it contained various errors. Richmond also had access to the internet and to Sartre’s French and German sources. Her edition also contains an Introduction and a ‘Notes on the translation’ section.Sartre published his work in 1943 and, unable to access all the works he cited, he often did so from memory. He also adopted certain translators’ neologisms: (...)
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  31. One Child: Do We Have a Right to Have More? By Sarah Conly. [REVIEW]Trevor Hedberg - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):934-938.
    Sarah Conly's One Child is a substantive treatment of the extent to which procreative freedom is curtailed by rising global population and the environmental problems to which it contributes. This review provides an overview of the book's content and closes with a few critical remarks. The book is highly recommended for those interested in the intersection between environmental ethics and the ethics of procreation.
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  32.  26
    Hispaneando y Lesbiando: On Sarah Hoagland's Lesbian Ethics.María Lugones - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):138-146.
    This review looks at Sarah Hoagland's Lesbian Ethics from the position of a lesbian who is also a cultural participant in a colonized heterosexualist culture within the powerful context of its colonizing heterosexualist culture. From this position separation from heterosexualism acquires great complexity since the position described is that of a plural self. In Lesbian Ethics lesbian community is the community of separation where demoralization is avoided by auto‐koenonous selves. Because heterosexualism is not a Cross‐cultural or international system but (...)
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  33.  79
    Review: Hispaneando y Lesbiando: On Sarah Hoagland's "Lesbian Ethics". [REVIEW]María Lugones - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):138-146.
    This review looks at Sarah Hoagland's Lesbian Ethics from the position of a lesbian who is also a cultural participant in a colonized heterosexualist culture within the powerful context of its colonizing heterosexualist culture . From this position separation from heterosexualism acquires great complexity since the position described is that of a plural self. In Lesbian Ethics lesbian community is the community of separation where demoralization is avoided by auto-koenonous selves. Because heterosexualism is not a cross-cultural or international system (...)
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  34.  44
    I—Sarah Broadie: Plato's Intelligible World?Sarah Broadie - 2004 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):65-80.
  35.  52
    Mad Mothers, Bad Mothers, and What a "Good" Mother Would Do: The Ethics of Ambivalence by Sarah LaChance Adams.Fiona Woollard - 2018 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (1):1-7.
    When a mother deliberately harms her child, it is tempting to assume that she must be either insane or lacking the "natural" love of a mother for her children. We want to believe that such mothers have almost nothing in common with "good" mothers. Drawing extensively on empirical research, Sarah LaChance Adams' Mad Mothers, Bad Mothers, and What A "Good" Mother Would Do shows that maternal ambivalence, simultaneous desires to nurture and violently reject one's children, is both common and (...)
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  36.  24
    Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome by Sarah S. Richardson.Maayan Sudai - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):1-8.
    Following the tradition of feminist philosophers and scholars of science from the 1980s onward such as Evelyn Fox-Keller, Helen Longino, Anne Fausto-Sterling, and others who revealed how popular notions of masculinity and femininity infiltrated and shaped the content of scientific knowledge, Sarah S. Richardson's book Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome deserves a place on the shelf with this canonical literature. It addresses one of the most celebrated symbols of biological sex binary: the (...)
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  37.  29
    American Public Education and the Responsibility of Its Citizens: Supporting Democracy in the Age of Accountability by Sarah M. Stitzlein.Johnnie R. Blunt - 2018 - Education and Culture 34 (1):81-85.
    In his 1916 preface to Democracy and Education, John Dewey comments that the main goal of his book was “to detect and state the ideas implied in a democratic society and to apply these ideas to the problems and enterprise of education. The discussion includes an indication of the constructive aims and methods of public education as seen from this point of view.”1 More than 100 years later, Sarah M. Stitzlein confirms Dewey’s ideas and expands his scholarship to defend (...)
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  38.  17
    Communicating the Quest for Sustainability: Ecofeminist Perspectives in Sarah Orne Jewett’s ‘A White Heron’.Archana Parashar & Mukesh Kumar - 2019 - Journal of Human Values 25 (2):101-112.
    The objective of this article is to study the relationship between men, women and nature in Sarah Orne Jewett’s ‘A White Heron’ by using ecofeminist perspectives. The cultural and moral vision of J...
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  39.  47
    British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century by Sarah Hutton.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):677-678.
    Most of our histories of philosophy, in our books and especially in our courses, are what William James called “appreciative chronicle[s] of human master-strokes”. They resemble tours of grand and isolated monuments. Sarah Hutton’s magnificent British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century is a different kind of history, in which masterpieces are placed in conversation with books that are now neglected or all but forgotten. By means of this “conversation model,” Hutton provides what she justly terms “a ‘thick description’ of (...)
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  40.  8
    Sarah Orne Jewett’s Depictions of Women in a Changing Medical Profession: Nan Prince and Almira Todd.Catherine Hand - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011705.
    Sarah Orne Jewett, who lived from 1849 to 1909, witnessed a revolution in medicine that led to the formation of the medical profession as it is recognised today. By comparing two of the author’s works, one written at the outset of her career and the other written much later, this paper discusses how Jewett’s views about women’s role in medicine changed and developed. In the first novel, A Country Doctor, a young Jewett celebrates the new-found power of scientific medicine (...)
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  41.  52
    Abraham, Sarah, and Surrogacy.Laura A. Cristiano - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (3):443-452.
    What insights into Church teaching can be drawn from the biblical account of Abraham and Sarah’s experience with surrogate pregnancy? When Sarah’s maid, Hagar, conceives Abraham’s son Ishmael, negative conse­quences ensue. Hagar’s contempt for Sarah incites Sarah’s jealousy. Sarah’s abuse of Hagar leads Hagar to run away. Abraham is forced to banish Hagar and his son Ismael. These unhappy repercussions arise from the fact that surrogacy violates God’s plan for marriage and for the dignity of (...)
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  42.  37
    Pornography Debate, Gaze and Spectatorship in Sarah Daniels’s "Masterpieces".Edyta Lorek-Jezińska - 2013 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 3 (3):154-170.
    Masterpieces by Sarah Daniels has been described as a voice in the debate on pornography, expressing the anti-pornography position as opposed to the liberal feminist stance in this debate. Despite its ideological clarity reported by many reviewers and critics, the play has been commented upon as deficient or inadequate because of evoking conflicting interpretations and ambiguity. The paper argues that these deficiencies stem from the play’s concern with the distribution of agency and passivity along gender lines as well as (...)
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  43.  80
    “Keeping It in the Family”: Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman.Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.
    : This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings on (...)
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  44.  37
    Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience by Sarah A. Mattice.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1374-1376.
    What is philosophy? What is metaphor? Could thinking take place metaphorically? If one follows the mainstream Western definition of philosophy, the answer to the latter question would certainly be negative. Metaphors are perceived as primitive, pre-analytical, and imprecise—thus pre-philosophical! Drawing on multiple cross-cultural resources, Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience by Sarah A. Mattice insightfully challenges this widespread assumption in the current...
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  45.  58
    Review: Sarah Lucia Hoagland's "Lesbian Ethics: Toward New Value" and Ablemindism. [REVIEW]Carol Van Kirk - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):147 - 152.
    Sarah Hoagland suggests that through developing the method of "attending" and the ethics of "autokoenony," individual integrity and agency will result. While acknowledging the utility of these ideals for many lesbians and wimmin, I argue that Hoagland's thesis is, regrettably, not universally applicable.
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  46.  44
    Remembering by Index and Content: Response to Sarah Robins.Michael E. Hasselmo - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):916-919.
    In her review of my book How we remember: Brain mechanisms of episodic memory, Sarah Robins highlights my example of the problem of interference between memories accessed by content-addressable memory. However, she points out the difficulty of solving this problem with index-addressable representations such as time cells or arc length cells. Namely, the index-addressable memory requires knowing the unique index in advance in order to perform effective retrieval. This is a difficult problem, but should be solvable by forming bi-directional (...)
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  47. Is Sarah Palin a Feminist?Linda Martín Alcoff & Sarah K. Miraglia - unknown
    We have been teaching gender issues and feminist theory for many years, and we know that there is certainly a diversity of views among women, and men, about what counts as feminist or as good for women. Some may see a competent woman running for V.P as inevitably a step forward for women's equality. But consider this.
     
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  48.  31
    The Function of Metaphor in Medieval Neoplatonism_ _, Written by Sarah Pessin.Sarah Pessin - 2015 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 9 (2):249-252.
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  49.  33
    Schreiben Ohne Macht Ein Gespräch MIT Sarah Kofman.Sarah Kofman, Ursula Beitz & Ursula Konnertz - 1991 - Die Philosophin 2 (3):103-109.
  50.  26
    “Keeping It in the Family”: Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman.Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.
    This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings on Nietzsche (...)
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