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Saul Fisher
Mercy College
  1. Philosophy of Architecture.Saul Fisher - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Central issues in philosophy of architecture include foundational matters regarding the nature of: (1) architecture as an artform, design medium, or other product or practice; (2) architectural objects—what sorts of things they are; how they differ from other sorts of objects; and how we define the range of such objects; (3) special architectural properties, like the standard trio of structural integrity (firmitas), beauty, and utility—or space, light, and form; and ways they might be special to architecture; (4) architectural types—how to (...)
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  2.  3
    Lifespans of Built Structures, Narrativity, and Conservation: A Critical Note.Saul Fisher - 2020 - Estetika (1):93-103.
    A critical note on Peter Lamarque and Nigel Walter’s ‘The Application of Narrative to the Conservation of Historic Buildings’.
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  3.  22
    Pierre Gassendi's Philosophy And Science: Atomism for Empiricists.Saul Fisher - 2005 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    This look at Gassendi’s philosophy and science illuminates his contributions to early modern thought and to the broader history of philosophy of science. Two keys to his thought are his novel picture of acquiring and judging empirical belief, and his liberal account of criteria for counting empirical beliefs as parts of warranted physical theories. By viewing his philosophical and scientific pursuits as part of one and the same project, Gassendi’s arguments on behalf of atomism can be fruitfully explained as licensed (...)
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  4.  45
    How to Think About the Ethics of Architecture.Saul Fisher - 2000 - In Warwick Fox (ed.), Ethics and the Built Environment. London, UK: pp. 170-182.
    Philosophical ethicists have not yet fully explored, or even mapped out, the problems posed by architectural practice. While some have attempted such explorations, their accounts suffer assorted philosophical deficits, and generally miss the aim of reasoned moral analysis. I believe that the most fruitful attempts to think about such issues in philosophical terms—in lieu of an analytical architectural ethics—are found in the body of architectural law. There we may glimpse some promising philosophical considerations pertaining to such matters as intellectual property, (...)
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  5.  26
    Pierre Gassendi.Saul Fisher - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Pierre Gassendi (b. 1592, d. 1655) was a French philosopher, scientific chronicler, observer, and experimentalist, scholar of ancient texts and debates, and active participant in contemporary deliberations of the first half of the seventeenth century. His significance in early modern thought has in recent years been rediscovered and explored, towards a better understanding of the dawn of modern empiricism, the mechanical philosophy, and relations of modern philosophy to ancient and medieval discussions. Through an arch-empiricism—tempered by adherence to key elements of (...)
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  6.  3
    The Soul as Vehicle for Genetic Information : Gassendi's Account of Inheritance.Saul Fisher - 2006 - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 103-123.
    Generation and heredity theories before early modern mechanist accounts might be faulted for numerous deficits. One might cite in this regard the failure to even attempt to explain how the inheritance of traits could occur, given what is known about the generation of new individuals. On the other hand, it would be hard to allow this as a true failure against the backdrop of a generation theory that poses form, and not matter, as the key to understanding the emergence of (...)
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  7.  50
    Architectural Notation and Computer Aided Design.Saul Fisher - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):273-289.
    In his Languages of Art, Nelson Goodman proposes a theory of artistic notation that includes foundational requirements for any system of symbols we might use to specify and communicate the features of an artwork, in architecture or any other art form. Goodmans' theory usefully explains how notation can reveal linguistic-like phenomena of various art forms. But not all art forms can enjoy benefits of a full-blown notational system, in Goodman's view, and he suggests that architecture's symbol systems fall short in (...)
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  8.  14
    Architecture and Philosophy of the City.Saul Fisher - 2019 - In Sharon M. Meagher, Samantha Noll & Joseph S. Biehl (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of the City. New York, NY, USA: pp. 131-142.
    The philosophy of architecture illuminates the nature of architectural objects, properties, and types—and the sorts of things they are; how we know about and judge architectural objects; and ethical and political considerations of architectural objects and practice. As intersects with the philosophy of the city, one set of questions focuses on (a) how the design process for built structures, and structures designed, relate to specifically urban contexts; (b) how our experience of built structures relates to urban contexts; and (c) how (...)
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  9.  11
    Aestheticism: Deep Formalism and the Emergence of Modernist Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Saul Fisher - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):437-440.
    Surely amongst the most exciting and vindicating features of philosophy and criticism of art are the interactions that they have with the actual practices of art. The histories of art and current discussions about art are dotted with special moments in which philosophers or critics—from Ruskin through to Danto and beyond—become influenced, or were influenced by, the art of their times. More curious—and less common still—is the influence of philosophy of art on art criticism, or the other way around. The (...)
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  10.  80
    Architectural Theory: The Vitruvian Fallacy (Volume I). [REVIEW]Saul Fisher - 2001 - British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (2):240-243.
  11.  26
    Early Modern Philosophy and Biological Thought.Saul Fisher - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4):373-377.
    Presents several articles on the modern philosophy and biological perspective on life science.
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  12.  33
    Gassendi's Atomist Account of Generation and Heredity in Plants and Animals.Saul Fisher - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4):484-512.
    In his accounts of plant and animal generation Pierre Gassendi offers a mechanist story of how organisms create offspring to whom they pass on their traits. Development of the new organism is directed by a material “soul” or animula bearing ontogenetic information. Where reproduction is sexual, two sets of material semina and corresponding animulae meet and jointly determine the division, differentiation, and development of matter in the new organism. The determination of inherited traits requires a means of combining or choosing (...)
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  13.  16
    Gassendi et l’Hypothèse dans la Méthode Scientifique.Saul Fisher - 2008 - In Sylvie Taussig (ed.), Gassendi et la modernité. Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 399-425.
    Aucune méthode d'hypothèse et de raisonnement hypothétique en science ne peut être examinée dc façon critique sans que soit résolue au préalable la question de ce qui sert d'hypothèse. D'un point de vue très général, des éléments très différents peuvent servir à constituer la partie hypothétique ou conjecturale de la science. Du temps de Gassendi, il était possible de recourir à des entités hypothétiques tels les tourbillons cartésiens, à de généralisations idéalisées de phénomènes telle la loi de la chute libre, (...)
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  14.  17
    LEGO® Formalism in Architecture.Saul Fisher - 2017 - In Roy T. Cook & Sondra Bacharach (eds.), Lego and Philosophy: Constructing Reality Brick by Brick. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers. pp. 27-37.
    LEGO tells about not just LEGO architecture but architecture generally: its objects, its aesthetic properties, and how people judge them. To illustrate how thinking about LEGO can help people with such matters, this chapter considers some scenarios. These scenarios illustrate two very different ways of thinking about architecture. On the one hand, people might think architectural objects (more commonly, "works of architecture"), like buildings, bridges, and aqueducts, have forms that stand on their own, and which thereby do not depend on (...)
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  15.  14
    LISA T. SARASOHN, Gassendi's Ethics: Freedom in a Mechanistic Universe. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996. Pp. Xii+236. ISBN 0-8014-2947-1. £35.50. [REVIEW]Saul Fisher - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Science 31 (3):361-375.
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  16.  14
    Open Technologies and Resources for the Humanities – and Cooperative Consequences.Saul Fisher - 2006 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 5 (2):127-145.
    The proliferation of open technologies and content in higher education is motivated by broad embrace of a principle of sharing that is consonant with various contemporary economic, pedagogic and policy drivers.At the same time, open technologies and content present the possibility of a departure in the culture of humanities research and teaching.The open frameworks celebrate and facilitate collaborative and cooperative modes of working which are, to a degree, alien to a traditional ‘individualist’ conception of work in the Humanities. But such (...)
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  17. ‘Probabilist’ Deductive Inference in Gassendi’s Logic.Saul Fisher - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 8:58-64.
    In his Logic, Pierre Gassendi proposes that our inductive inferences lack the information we would need to be certain of the claims that they suggest. Not even deductivist inference can insure certainty about empirical claims because the experientially attained premises with which we adduce support for such claims are no greater than probable. While something is surely amiss in calling deductivist inference "probabilistic," it seems Gassendi has hit upon a now-familiar, sensible point—namely, the use of deductive reasoning in empirical contexts, (...)
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  18.  7
    Ruins and Sham Ruins as Architectural Objects.Saul Fisher - 2019 - In Jeanette Bicknell, Jennifer Judkins & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials: Philosophical Perspectives on Artifacts and Memory. New York, NY, USA:
    The premium on authenticity attributed to aesthetic appreciation and judgment of ruins is unnecessary, even while valuable for engagement with ruins as historical objects. I contrast values we assign to architectural ruins and to nongenuine, sham ruins. Ruins are components of built past architectural objects; sham ruins are components of fantasy, unbuilt architectural objects. Taking architectural objects as abstractions realized or realizable as built objects, ruins and sham ruins alike are built instances of corresponding abstract objects. Sham ruins do not (...)
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  19. Science and Skepticism in the Seventeenth Century: The Atomism and Scientific Method of Pierre Gassendi.Saul Fisher - 1997 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    In this account of the philosophical and scientific pursuits of Pierre Gassendi , I challenge a traditional view which says that the inspiration, motivation, and demonstrative grounds for his physical atomism consist not in his empiricism but in his historicist commitments. Indeed, Gassendi suggests that it's a consequence of our best theory of knowledge and sound scientific method that we get evidence which warrants his microphysical theory. ;The primary novelty of his theory of empirical knowledge is his proposal, against the (...)
     
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  20. Why is Architecture a “Social” Art?Saul Fisher - 2002 - In Carol C. Gould (ed.), Constructivism and Practice: Toward a Historical Epistemology. Lanham, MD, USA: pp. 193–203.
    Architecture is apparently unlike the other plastic arts in that we tend to attribute to it, nearly universally, a social nature. But what, if anything, makes architecture intrinsically ‘social’? There are two leading candidate reasons that architecture is considered as a social art: (S1) the aim of architecture, as determined or realized by architects’ underlying intentions, is to design shelter—a social need, and (S2) the practice of architecture requires interpersonal relations of a social nature; hence as an art form it (...)
     
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  21.  6
    When is Architecture Not Design?Saul Fisher - 2019 - Laocoonte: Revista de Estética y Teoría de Las Artes 1 (6):183-198.
    If there is nothing more to architecture than design –and to its attendant thinking processes–than design thinking, then core dimensions of the architectural enterprise from the perspective of (a) production and (b) use have no special character, over and above their counterparts in general design. Yet that does not appear to be true by the lights of architects or design specialists or the public at large. So what is it, at the core or periphery of the discipline or its objects, (...)
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  22.  21
    Letters to the Editor.Leemon McHenry, Frank B. Dilley, Saul Fisher, Richard Field, Michael Huemer & Bruce Wilshire - 2000 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 73 (5):169 - 186.