Results for 'Schizophrenia'

993 found
Order:
See also
  1. Schizophrenia, Consciousness, and the Self.Louis A. Sass & Josef Parnas - 2003 - Schizophrenia Bulletin 29 (3):427-444.
    In recent years, there has been much focus on the apparent heterogeneity of schizophrenic symptoms. By contrast, this article proposes a unifying account emphasizing basic abnormalities of consciousness that underlie and also antecede a disparate assortment of signs and symptoms. Schizophrenia, we argue, is fundamentally a self-disorder or ipseity disturbance that is characterized by complementary distortions of the act of awareness: hyperreflexivity and diminished self-affection. Hyperreflexivity refers to forms of exaggerated self-consciousness in which aspects of oneself are experienced as (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   115 citations  
  2. Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation is Impaired in Schizophrenia.Hsiao-Lun Ku, Timothy Lane & et al - 2017 - Schizophrenia Research:xx-yy.
    Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases and higher mortality from them than does the general population; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Impaired cerebral autoregulation is associated with cerebrovascular diseases and their mortality. Increased or decreased cerebral blood flow in different brain regions has been reported in patients with schizophrenia, which implies impaired cerebral autoregulation. This study investigated the cerebral autoregulation in 21 patients with schizophrenia and 23 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. None (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  8
    Abnormal Resting-State Connectivity in a Substantia Nigra-Related Striato-Thalamo-Cortical Network in a Large Sample of First-Episode Drug-Naïve Patients With Schizophrenia.Matteo Martino, Georg Northoff & Timothy Joseph Lane - 2017 - Schizophrenia Bulletin.
    Objective: The dopamine hypothesis is one of the most influential theories of the neurobiological background of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, direct evidence for abnormal dopamine-related subcortical-cortical circuitry disconnectivity is still lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to test dopamine-related substantia nigra (SN)-based striato-thalamo-cortical resting-state functional connectivity (FC) in SCZ. Method: Based on our a priori hypothesis, we analyzed a large sample resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) dataset from first-episode drug-naïve SCZ patients (n = 112) and healthy controls (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  70
    Lalumera, E. 2017 (in Press) Understanding Schizophrenia Through Wittgenstein: Empathy, Explanation, and Philosophical Clarification, in Schizophrenia and Common Sense, Hipólito, I., Gonçalves, J., Pereira, J. (Eds.). SpringerNature, Mind-Brain Studies.E. Lalumera - forthcoming - In I. Hipolito, J. Goncalves & J. Pereira (eds.), Schizophrenia and Common Sense, Hipólito, I., Gonçalves, J., Pereira, J. (eds.). SpringerNature, Mind-Brain Studies. Dordrecht: Springer.
    Wittgenstein’s concepts shed light on the phenomenon of schizophrenia in at least three different ways: with a view to empathy, scientific explanation, or philosophical clarification. I consider two different “positive” wittgensteinian accounts―Campbell’s idea that delusions involve a mechanism of which different framework propositions are parts, Sass’ proposal that the schizophrenic patient can be described as a solipsist, and a Rhodes’ and Gipp’s account, where epistemic aspects of schizophrenia are explained as failures in the ordinary background of certainties. I (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  14
    Is the Sense of Agency in Schizophrenia Influenced by Resting-State Variation in Self-Referential Regions of the Brain?Jeffrey Robinson, Nils-Frederic Wagner & Georg Northoff - 2016 - Schizophrenia Bulletin 42 (2):270-276.
    Schizophrenia is a disturbance of the self, of which the attribution of agency is a major component. In this article, we review current theories of the Sense of Agency, their relevance to schizophrenia, and propose a novel framework for future research. We explore some of the models of agency, in which both bottom-up and top-down processes are implicated in the genesis of agency. We further this line of inquiry by suggesting that ongoing neurological activity (the brain’s resting state) (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Explaining Schizophrenia: Auditory Verbal Hallucination and Self‐Monitoring.Wayne Wu - 2012 - Mind and Language 27 (1):86-107.
    Do self‐monitoring accounts, a dominant account of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, explain auditory verbal hallucination? In this essay, I argue that the account fails to answer crucial questions any explanation of auditory verbal hallucination must address. Where the account provides a plausible answer, I make the case for an alternative explanation: auditory verbal hallucination is not the result of a failed control mechanism, namely failed self‐monitoring, but, rather, of the persistent automaticity of auditory experience of a voice. My (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  7. Schizophrenia and the Scaffolded Self.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Topoi:1-13.
    A family of recent externalist approaches in philosophy of mind argues that our psychological capacities are synchronically and diachronically “scaffolded” by external (i.e., beyond-the-brain) resources. I consider how these “scaffolded” approaches might inform debates in phenomenological psychopathology. I first introduce the idea of “affective scaffolding” and make some taxonomic distinctions. Next, I use schizophrenia as a case study to argue — along with others in phenomenological psychopathology — that schizophrenia is fundamentally a self-disturbance. However, I offer a subtle (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8.  97
    Epistemic Benefits of Elaborated and Systematized Delusions in Schizophrenia.Lisa Bortolotti - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (3):879-900.
    In this article I ask whether elaborated and systematized delusions emerging in the context of schizophrenia have the potential for epistemic innocence. Cognitions are epistemically innocent if they have significant epistemic benefits that could not be attained otherwise. In particular, I propose that a cognition is epistemically innocent if it delivers some significant epistemic benefit to a given agent at a given time, and if alternative cognitions delivering the same epistemic benefit are unavailable to that agent at that time. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  9. Mechanisms of Auditory Verbal Hallucination in Schizophrenia.Wayne Wu & Raymond Cho - 2013 - Frontiers in Schizophrenia 4.
    Recent work on the mechanisms underlying auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) has been heavily informed by self-monitoring accounts that postulate defects in an internal monitoring mechanism as the basis of AVH. A more neglected alternative is an account focusing on defects in auditory processing, namely a spontaneous activation account of auditory activity underlying AVH. Science is often aided by putting theories in competition. Accordingly, a discussion that systematically contrasts the two models of AVH can generate sharper questions that will lead to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  10. Embodiment and Affectivity in Moebius Syndrome and Schizophrenia: A Phenomenological Analysis.Joel Krueger & Mads Gram Henriksen - forthcoming - In J. Aaron Simmons & James Hackett (eds.), Phenomenology for the 21st Century. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this comparative study, we examine experiential disruptions of embodiment and affectivity in Moebius Syndrome and schizophrenia. We suggest that using phenomenological resources to explore these experiences may help us better understand what it’s like to live with these conditions, and that such an understanding may have significant therapeutic value. Additionally, we suggest that this sort of phenomenologically-informed comparative analysis can shed light on the importance of embodiment and affectivity for the constitution of a sense of self and interpersonal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11.  77
    The Modus Vivendi of Persons with Schizophrenia: Valueception Impairment and Phenomenological Reduction.Guido Cusinato - 2018 - Thaumàzein – Rivista di Filosofia 6:78-92.
    So far, the value dimension underlying affectivity disorders has remained out of focus in phenomenological psychopathology. As early as at the beginning of the 20th century, however, German phenomenologist Max Scheler examined in depth the relationship between affectivity and value dimension through the concept of valueception (Wertnehmung). In this sense, a recent noteworthy contribution has been provided by John Cutting, who has drawn attention to the importance of Scheler’s analyses for psychiatry. In this work I take into consideration only two (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. On Incomprehensibility in Schizophrenia.Mads Gram Henriksen - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):105-129.
    This article examines the supposedly incomprehensibility of schizophrenic delusions. According to the contemporary classificatory systems (DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10), some delusions typically found in schizophrenia are considered bizarre and incomprehensible. The aim of this article is to discuss the notion of understanding that deems these delusions incomprehensible and to see if it is possible to comprehend these delusions if we apply another notion of understanding. First, I discuss the contemporary schizophrenia definitions and their inherent problems, and I argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13.  42
    Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia.William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical regions that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  14.  19
    Exploring Researchers’ Experiences of Working with a Researcher-Driven, Population-Specific Community Advisory Board in a South African Schizophrenia Genomics Study.Megan M. Campbell, Ezra Susser, Jantina de Vries, Adam Baldinger, Goodman Sibeko, Michael M. Mndini, Sibonile G. Mqulwana, Odwa A. Ntola, Raj S. Ramesar & Dan J. Stein - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundCommunity engagement within biomedical research is broadly defined as a collaborative relationship between a research team and a group of individuals targeted for research. A Community Advisory Board is one mechanism of engaging the community. Within genomics research CABs may be particularly relevant due to the potential implications of research findings drawn from individual participants on the larger communities they represent. Within such research, CABs seek to meet instrumental goals such as protecting research participants and their community from research-related risks, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15.  42
    The Ghost in the Machine: Disembodiment in Schizophrenia - Two Case Studies.Sanneke de Haan & Thomas Fuchs - 2010 - Psychopathology 43 (5):327-333.
    The notion of embodiment is central to the phenomenological approach to schizophrenia. This paper argues that fundamental concepts for the understanding of schizophrenia have a bodily dimension. We present two single cases of first-onset schizophrenic patients and analyze the reports of their experiences. Problems such as loss of self, loss of common sense, and intentionality disorders reveal a disconnectedness that can be traced back to a detachment from the lived body. Hyperreflectivity and hyperautomaticity are used as coping mechanisms, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  16. Losing Social Space: Phenomenological Disruptions of Spatiality and Embodiment in Moebius Syndrome and Schizophrenia.Joel Krueger & Amanda Taylor Aiken - forthcoming - In Jack Reynolds & Ricky Sebold (eds.), Phenomenology and Science. Palgracve Macmillan.
    We argue that a phenomenological approach to social space, as well as its relation to embodiment and affectivity, is crucial for understanding how the social world shows up as social in the first place—that is, as affording different forms of sharing, connection, and relatedness. We explore this idea by considering two cases where social space is experientially disrupted: Moebius Syndrome and schizophrenia. We show how this altered sense of social space emerges from subtle disruptions of embodiment and affectivity characteristic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Schizophrenia and the Virtues of Self-Effacement.Paul Barry - 2016 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 11 (1):29-48.
    Michael Stocker’s “The Schizophrenia of Modern Ethical Theories” attacks versions of consequentialism and deontological ethics on the grounds that they are self-effacing. While it is often thought that Stocker’s argument gives us a reason to favour virtue ethics over those other theories, Simon Keller has argued that this is a mistake. He claims that virtue ethics is also self-effacing, and is therefore afflicted with the self-effacement- related problems that Stocker identifies in consequentialism and deontology. This paper defends virtue ethics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Schizophrenia and the Dysfunctional Brain.Justin Garson - 2010 - Journal of Cognitive Science 11:215-246.
    Scientists, philosophers, and even the lay public commonly accept that schizophrenia stems from a biological or internal ‘dysfunction.’ However, this assessment is typically accompanied neither by well-defined criteria for determining that something is dysfunctional nor empirical evidence that schizophrenia satisfies those criteria. In the following, a concept of biological function is developed and applied to a neurobiological model of schizophrenia. It concludes that current evidence does not warrant the claim that schizophrenia stems from a biological dysfunction, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  46
    The Disoriented Self. Layers and Dynamics of Self-Experience in Dementia and Schizophrenia.Michela Summa - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):477-496.
    This paper explores the question concerning the relationship between basic and higher layers of experience and self-experience. The latter distinction implicitly presupposes the idea of a univocal foundation. After explaining the formal ontological law of foundation, an attempt is made to clarify how the idea of foundation may be suitable to understand the relationship among moments, or layers, of self-experience. To this aim, the phenomenological descriptions of self- and world-experience in dementia and schizophrenia are compared. The comparison between these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20.  46
    Conscious Recollection in Autobiographical Memory: An Investigation in Schizophrenia.Jean-Marie Danion, Christine Cuervo, Pascale Piolino, Caroline Huron, Marielle Riutort, Charles S. Peretti & Francis Eustache - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):535-547.
    Whether or not conscious recollection in autobiographical memory is affected in schizophrenia is unknown. The aim of this study was to address this issue using an experiential approach. An autobiographical memory enquiry was used in combination with the Remember/Know procedure. Twenty-two patients with schizophrenia and 22 normal subjects were asked to recall specific autobiographical memories from four lifetime periods and to indicate the subjective states of awareness associated with the recall of what happened, when and where. They gave (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  21. Failing to Self-Ascribe Thought and Motion: Towards a Three-Factor Account of Passivity Symptoms in Schizophrenia.David Miguel Gray - 2014 - Schizophrenia Research 152 (1):28-32.
    There has recently been emphasis put on providing two-factor accounts of monothematic delusions. Such accounts would explain (1) whether a delusional hypothesis (e.g. someone else is inserting thoughts into my mind) can be understood as a prima facie reasonable response to an experience and (2) why such a delusional hypothesis is believed and maintained given its implausibility and evidence against it. I argue that if we are to avoid obfuscating the cognitive mechanisms involved in monothematic delusion formation we should split (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  43
    Affectivity in Schizophrenia: A Phenomenological View.Louis A. Sass - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):127-147.
    Schizophrenia involves profound but enigmatic disturbances of affective or emotional life. The affective responses as well as expression of many patients in the schizophrenia spectrum can seem odd, incongruent, inadequate, or otherwise off-the-mark. Such patients are, in fact, often described in rather contradictory terms: as being prone both to exaggerated and to diminished levels of emotional or affective response. According to Ernst Kretschmer, they actually tend to have both kinds of experience at the same time. This paper attempts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23. Self-Consciousness, Self-Agency, and Schizophrenia.Tilo T. J. Kircher & Dirk T. Leube - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):656-669.
    Empirical approaches on topics such as consciousness, self-awareness, or introspective perspective, need a conceptual framework so that the emerging, still unconnected findings can be integrated and put into perspective. We introduce a model of self-consciousness derived from phenomenology, philosophy, the cognitive, and neurosciences. We will then give an overview of research data on one particular aspect of our model, self-agency, trying to link findings from cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Finally, we will expand on pathological aspects of self-agency, and in particular (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  24. Introduction: Understanding, Explaining, and Intersubjectivity in Schizophrenia.Christoph Hoerl - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):83-88.
    This article provides an introduction to a special issue of the journal Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology, On Understanding and Explaining Schizophrenia. The article identifies a common thread running through the different contributions to this special issue, inspired by Jaspers's (1963) suggestion that a profound impairment in the ability to engage in interpersonal and social relations is a key factor in psychiatric disorders. It is argued that this suggestion can help solve a central dilemma in psychopathology, which is to make (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model.Ralf-Peter Behrendt & Claire Young - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is based (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26.  22
    The Enactive Approach and Disorders of the Self - the Case of Schizophrenia.Miriam Kyselo - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):591-616.
    The paper discusses two recent approaches to schizophrenia, a phenomenological and a neuroscientific approach, illustrating how new directions in philosophy and cognitive science can elaborate accounts of psychopathologies of the self. It is argued that the notion of the minimal and bodily self underlying these approaches is still limited since it downplays the relevance of social interactions and relations for the formation of a coherent sense of self. These approaches also illustrate that we still lack an account of how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  28
    Rational Suicide: Philosophical Perspectives on Schizophrenia[REVIEW]Jeanette Hewitt - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):25-31.
    Suicide prevention is a National Health Service priority in the United Kingdom. People with mental illness are seen to represent one of the most vulnerable groups for suicide and recent British Government policy has focused on prevention and management of perceived risk. This approach to suicide prevention is constructed under a biomedical model of psychiatry, which maintains that suicidal persons suffer from some form of disease or irrational drive towards self-destruction. Many react to the idea of self-inflicted death with instinctive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28.  54
    A Computational Approach to Quantifiers as an Explanation for Some Language Impairments in Schizophrenia.Marcin Zajenkowski, Rafał Styła & Jakub Szymanik - 2011 - Journal of Communication Disorder 44:2011.
    We compared the processing of natural language quantifiers in a group of patients with schizophrenia and a healthy control group. In both groups, the difficulty of the quantifiers was consistent with computational predictions, and patients with schizophrenia took more time to solve the problems. However, they were significantly less accurate only with proportional quantifiers, like more than half. This can be explained by noting that, according to the complexity perspective, only proportional quantifiers require working memory engagement.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  66
    An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain.Jonathan Kenneth Burns - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social brain, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  30.  55
    Beyond Words: Linguistic Experience in Melancholia, Mania, and Schizophrenia[REVIEW]Louis Sass & Elizabeth Pienkos - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):475-495.
    In this paper, we use a phenomenological approach to compare the unusual ways in which language can be experienced by individuals with schizophrenia or severe mood disorders, specifically mania and melancholia. Our discussion follows a tripartite/dialectical format: first we describe traditionally observed distinctions ; then we consider some apparent similarities in the experience of language in these conditions. Finally, we explore more subtle, qualitative differences. These involve: 1, interpersonal orientation, 2, forms of attention and context-relevance, 3, underlying mutations of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  92
    Schizophrenia and Moral Responsibility: A Kantian Essay.Matthé Scholten - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):205-225.
    In this paper, I give a Kantian answer to the question whether and why it would be inappropriate to blame people suffering from mental disorders that fall within the schizophrenia spectrum. I answer this question by reconstructing Kant’s account of mental disorder, in particular his explanation of psychotic symptoms. Kant explains these symptoms in terms of various types of cognitive impairment. I show that this explanation is plausible and discuss Kant’s claim that the unifying feature of the symptoms is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  15
    Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding.Jean-Rémy Martin - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33.  9
    Luria Revisited: Cognitive Research in Schizophrenia, Past Implications and Future Challenges.Yuliya Zaytseva, Raymond Chan, Ernst Pöppel & Andreas Heinz - 2015 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10:4.
    Contemporary psychiatry is becoming more biologically oriented in the attempt to elicit a biological rationale of mental diseases. Although mental disorders comprise mostly functional abnormalities, there is a substantial overlap between neurology and psychiatry in addressing cognitive disturbances. In schizophrenia, the presence of cognitive impairment prior to the onset of psychosis and early after its manifestation suggests that some neurocognitive abnormalities precede the onset of psychosis and may represent a trait marker. These cognitive alterations may arise from functional disconnectivity, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  58
    Schizophrenia and the Experience of Intersubjectivity as Threat.Paul Henry Lysaker, Jason K. Johannesen & John Timothy Lysaker - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (3):335-352.
    Many with schizophrenia find social interactions a profound and terrifying threat to their sense of self. To better understand this we draw upon dialogical models of the self that suggest that those with schizophrenia have difficulty sustaining dialogues among diverse aspects of self. Because interpersonal exchanges solicit and evoke movement among diverse aspects of self, many with schizophrenia may consequently find those exchanges overwhelming, resulting in despair, the sensation of fusion with another, and/or self-dissolution. In short, compromised (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  16
    Neural Correlates of Cognitive Improvements Following Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials.Clémence Isaac & Dominique Januel - 2016 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
    BackgroundCognitive impairments are a core feature in schizophrenia and are linked to poor social functioning. Numerous studies have shown that cognitive remediation can enhance cognitive and functional abilities in patients with this pathology. The underlying mechanism of these behavioral improvements seems to be related to structural and functional changes in the brain. However, studies on neural correlates of such enhancement remain scarce.ObjectivesWe explored the neural correlates of cognitive enhancement following cognitive remediation interventions in schizophrenia and the differential effect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  40
    Schizophrenia Epigenesis?Jason Scott Robert - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (2):191-215.
    I begin by examining how genetics drivesschizophrenia research, and raise both familiar andrelatively novel criticisms of the evidence putativelysupporting the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Inparticular, I call attention to a set of concernsabout the effects of placentation on concordance ratesof schizophrenia in monozygotic twins, which furtherweakens the case for schizophrenia''s so-called stronggenetic component. I then underscore two criticalpoints. First, I emphasize the importance of takingseriously considerations about the complexity of bothontogenesis and the development of hereditarydiseases. The recognition (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37.  71
    Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia: First Person Vs Third Person Perspective.O. Gambini, V. Barbieri & S. Scarone - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):39-46.
    Patients suffering from schizophrenia have an impaired meta-representation also known as Theory of Mind . Moreover, the presence of delusions or other positive symptoms of schizophrenia has been correlated to poor ToM performances. Lack of insight is a common symptom of schizophrenia and can be considered a critical manifestation of impaired ToM abilities. In particular, the present study addresses the role of perspective ToM ability in schizophrenic patients. Thirty severely delusional schizophrenic patients completely lack insight when interviewed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  69
    Affection of Contact and Transcendental Telepathy in Schizophrenia and Autism.Yasuhiko Murakami - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):179-194.
    This paper seeks to demonstrate the structural difference in communication of schizophrenia and autism. For a normal adult, spontaneous communication is nothing but the transmission of phantasía (thought) by means of perceptual objects or language. This transmission is first observed in a make-believe play of child. Husserl named this function “perceptual phantasía,” and this function presupposes as its basis the “internalized affection of contact” (which functions empirically in eye contact, body contact, or voice calling me). Regarding autism, because of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  86
    Consciousness in Schizophrenia: A Metacognitive Approach to Semantic Memory.Elisabeth Bacon, Jean-Marie Danion, Francoise Kauffmann-Muller & Agnès Bruant - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):473-484.
    Recent studies have shown that schizophrenia may be a disease affecting the states of consciousness. The present study is aimed at investigating metamemory, i.e., the knowledge about one's own memory capabilities, in patients with schizophrenia. The accuracy of the Confidence level (CL) in the correctness of the answers provided during a recall phase, and the predictability of the Feeling of Knowing (FOK) when recall fails were measured using a task consisting of general information questions and assessing semantic memory. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  29
    The Future of Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapeutics: Not so Bleak.William T. Carpenter Jr - 2012 - Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):13.
    Chlorpromazine efficacy in schizophrenia was observed 60 years ago. Advances in pharmacotherapy of this disorder have been modest with effectiveness still limited to the psychosis psychopathology and mechanism still dependent on dopamine antagonism. While a look backward may generate pessimism, future discovery may be far more robust. The near future will see significant changes in paradigms applied in discovery. Rather than viewing schizophrenia as a disease entity represented by psychosis, the construct will be deconstructed into component psychopathology domains. (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  37
    Impaired Strategic Regulation of Contents of Conscious Awareness in Schizophrenia.Philippe Sonntag, Erick Gokalsing, Carinne Olivier, Philippe Robert, Franck Burglen, Françoise Kauffmann-Muller, Caroline Huron, Pierre Salame & Jean-Marie Danion - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):190-200.
    Conscious awareness comprises two distinct states, autonoetic and noetic awareness. Schizophrenia impairs autonoetic, but not noetic, awareness. We investigated the strategic regulation of relevant and irrelevant contents of conscious awareness in schizophrenia using a directed forgetting paradigm. Twenty-one patients with schizophrenia and 21 normal controls were presented with words and told to learn some of them and forget others. In a subsequent test, they were asked to recognize all the words they had seen previously and give remember, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Schizophrenia, Mental Capacity, and Rational Suicide.Jeanette Hewitt - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):63-77.
    A diagnosis of schizophrenia is often taken to denote a state of global irrationality within the psychiatric paradigm, wherein psychotic phenomena are seen to equate with a lack of mental capacity. However, the little research that has been undertaken on mental capacity in psychiatric patients shows that people with schizophrenia are more likely to experience isolated, rather than constitutive, irrationality and are therefore not necessarily globally incapacitated. Rational suicide has not been accepted as a valid choice for people (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Insight and Psychosis: Awareness of Illness in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders.Xavier F. Amador & Anthony S. David (eds.) - 2004 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The insight a patient shares into their own psychosis is fundamental to their condition - it goes to the heart of what we understand 'madness' to be. Can a person be expected to accept treatment for a condition that they deny they have? Can a person be held responsible for their actions if those actions are inspired by their own unique perceptions and beliefs - beliefs that no-one else shares? The topic of insight in schizophrenia and related disorders has (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  40
    Self-Awareness of Cognitive Functioning in Schizophrenia.Alice Medalia & Rosa W. Lim - 2004 - Schizophrenia Research 71 (2):331-338.
  45.  46
    Misattribution of Agency in Schizophrenia: An Exploration of Historical First-Person Accounts.Jpma Maes & A. R. Van Gool - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):191-202.
    This paper provides a concise description and discussion of bottom–up and top–down approaches to misattribution of agency in schizophrenia. It explores if first-person accounts of passivity phenomena can provide support for one of these approaches. The focus is on excerpts in which the writers specifically examine their experiences of external influence. None of the accounts provides arguments that fit easily with only one of the possible approaches, which is in line with current attempts to theoretical integration.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  65
    Wellbeing, Schizophrenia and Experience Machines.David Rhys Birks - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (2):81-88.
    In the USA and England and Wales, involuntary treatment for mental illness is subject to the constraint that it must be necessary for the health or safety of the patient, if he poses no danger to others. I will argue against this necessary condition of administering treatment and propose that the category of individuals eligible for involuntary treatment should be extended. I begin by focusing on the common disorder of schizophrenia and proceed to demonstrate that it can be a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  19
    Psychopharmacology of Schizophrenia: The Future Looks Bleak.Chittaranjan Andrade, Rajiv Radhakrishnan & Praveen P. Fernandes - 2012 - Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):4.
    Introduction: More than half a century after the introduction of effective pharmacotherapy for the illness, in most patients schizophrenia remains a chronic, relapsing condition with poor long-term outcomes. Methods: We examine the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia from different perspectives to understand why there have not been significant advances, and to consider what the future might hold in store. Results: We argue that the treatment of schizophrenia addresses the phenotype and not the cause; that the causes may not (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  18
    Perspectivity in Psychiatric Research: The Psychopathology of Schizophrenia in Postwar Germany. [REVIEW]Yazan Abu Ghazal - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1):103-111.
    The reorganization of psychiatric knowledge at the turn of the twentieth century derived from Emil Kraepelin’s clinical classification of psychoses. Surprisingly, within just few years, Kraepelin’s simple dichotomy between dementia praecox and manic-depressive psychosis succeeded in giving psychiatry a new framework that is still used until the present day. Unexpectedly, Kraepelin’s simple clinical scheme based on the dichotomy replaced the significantly more differentiated nosography that dominated psychiatric research in the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Moreover, although all the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  14
    Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia: Evidence-Based Strategies.S. Englisch & M. Zink - 2012 - Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):20.
    Treatment-resistant symptoms complicate the clinical course of schizophrenia, and a large proportion of patients do not reach functional recovery. In consequence, polypharmacy is frequently used in treatment-refractory cases, addressing psychotic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms, treatment-emergent side effects caused by antipsychotics and comorbid depressive or obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To a large extent, such strategies are not covered by pharmacological guidelines which strongly suggest antipsychotic monotherapy. Add-on strategies comprise combinations of several antipsychotic agents and augmentations with mood stabilizers; moreover, antidepressants and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  6
    ADNP Plays a Key Role in Autophagy: From Autism to Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's Disease.Shlomo Sragovich, Avia Merenlender-Wagner & Illana Gozes - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (11):1700054.
    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein, discovered in our laboratory in 1999, has been characterized as a master gene vital for mammalian brain formation. ADNP de novo mutations in humans result in a syndromic form of autism-like spectrum disorder, including cognitive and motor deficits, the ADNP syndrome. One of the most important cellular processes associated with ADNP is the autophagy pathway, recently discovered by us as a key player in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In this regard, given the link between the microtubule (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 993