Results for 'Science communication'

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  1. Discourse, Interaction and Communication Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium on Cognitive Science.Xabier Arrazola, Kepa Korta, Francis Jeffry Pelletier & International Colloquium on Cognitive Science - 1998
     
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  2.  30
    Taking Our Own Medicine: On an Experiment in Science Communication.Maja Horst - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):801-815.
    In 2007 a social scientist and a designer created a spatial installation to communicate social science research about the regulation of emerging science and technology. The rationale behind the experiment was to improve scientific knowledge production by making the researcher sensitive to new forms of reactions and objections. Based on an account of the conceptual background to the installation and the way it was designed, the paper discusses the nature of the engagement enacted through the experiment. It is (...)
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  3.  93
    Extended Cognition in Science Communication.David Ludwig - 2014 - Public Understanding of Science 23 (8):982-995.
    The aim of this article is to propose a methodological externalism that takes knowledge about science to be partly constituted by the environment. My starting point is the debate about extended cognition in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science. Externalists claim that human cognition extends beyond the brain and can be partly constituted by external devices. First, I show that most studies of public knowledge about science are based on an internalist framework that excludes the environment we usually (...)
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    Making the Audience a Key Participant in the Science Communication Process.Carol L. Rogers - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):553-557.
    The public communication of science and technology has become increasingly important over the last several decades. However, understanding the audience that receives this information remains the weak link in the science communication process. This essay provides a brief review of some of the issues involved, discusses results from an audience-based study, and suggests some strategies that both scientists and journalists can use to modify media coverage in ways that can help audiences better understand major public issues (...)
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  5.  52
    Assumptions of the Deficit Model Type of Thinking: Ignorance, Attitudes, and Science Communication in the Debate on Genetic Engineering in Agriculture. [REVIEW]Marko Ahteensuu - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):295-313.
    This paper spells out and discusses four assumptions of the deficit model type of thinking. The assumptions are: First, the public is ignorant of science. Second, the public has negative attitudes towards (specific instances of) science and technology. Third, ignorance is at the root of these negative attitudes. Fourth, the public’s knowledge deficit can be remedied by one-way science communication from scientists to citizens. It is argued that there is nothing wrong with ignorance-based explanations per se. (...)
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  6.  30
    Disciplinary Networks and Bounding: Scientific Communication Between Science and Technology Studies and the History of Science[REVIEW]Frédéric Vandermoere & Raf Vanderstraeten - 2012 - Minerva 50 (4):451-470.
    This article examines the communication networks within and between science and technology studies (STS) and the history of science. In particular, journal relatedness data are used to analyze some of the structural features of their disciplinary identities and relationships. The results first show that, although the history of science is more than half a century older than STS, the size of the STS network is more than twice that of the history of science network. Further, (...)
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  7.  23
    Radical Constructivism in Communication Science.A. Scholl - 2010 - Constructivist Foundations 6 (1):51-57.
    Purpose: Describing how radical constructivism was introduced to communication science and analyzing why it has not yet become a mainstream endeavour. Situation: Before radical constructivism entered the relevant debates in communication sciences, moderate constructivist positions had already been developed. Problem: Radical constructivists’ argumentation has often been provocative and exaggerating in style, and extreme in its position. This has provoked harsh reactions within the mainstream scientific community. Several argumentative strategies have been used to degrade radical constructivist arguments and (...)
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  8.  8
    Making Science Accessible: A Semiotics of Scientific Communication[REVIEW]Christopher H. Lowrey & Priya Venkatesan - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (2):253-269.
    This article serves as a demonstration of how certain models of literary analysis, used to theorize and analyze fiction and narrative, can also be applied to scientific communication in such a manner as to promote the accessibility of science to the general public and a greater awareness of the methodology used in making scientific discovery. The approach of this article is based on the assumption that the principles of structuralism and semiotics can provide plausible explanations for the divide (...)
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  9.  64
    From Embodiment to Agency: Cognitive Science, Critical Realism and Communication Frameworks.Tobin Nellhaus - 2004 - Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):103-132.
    The primacy of practice in the development of knowledge is one of materialism’s fundamental tenets. Most arguments supporting it have been strictly philosophical. However, over the past thirty years cognitive science has provided mounting evidence supporting the primacy of practice. Particularly striking is its finding that thought is fundamentally metaphoric—that images emerging from everyday embodied activities not only make ordinary experiences intelligible, but also underpin our more abstract engagements with the world, elaborated in disciplines such as ethics and (...). Cognitive science’s implications must now be absorbed into critical realism. Cognitive science bolsters critical realism by providing a scientifically-grounded analysis of the passage from body to mind and the fundamental unity between them, while sustaining their distinctiveness. Its implications for critical realism ripple out in four waves: first, critical realism’s understanding of the mind/body relationship; second, its concepts of the process that connects theory and practice, and what that means for critical realism’s view of intellectual production, the place of metaphor in scientific theorization, and cultural development; its view of culture as a complexwhole; and finally, its theory of human agency as embodied and intentional. (shrink)
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  10.  2
    Fairness in Knowing: Science Communication and Epistemic Justice.Fabien Medvecky - forthcoming - Science and Engineering Ethics:1-16.
    Science communication, as a field and as a practice, is fundamentally about knowledge distribution; it is about the access to, and the sharing of knowledge. All distribution brings with it issues of ethics and justice. Indeed, whether science communicators acknowledge it or not, they get to decide both which knowledge is shared, and who gets access to this knowledge. As a result, the decisions of science communicators have important implications for epistemic justice: how knowledge is distributed (...)
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  11.  4
    Neurodharma Self-Help: Personalized Science Communication as Brain Management.Jenny Eklöf - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (3):303-317.
    Over the past ten to fifteen years, medical interventions, therapeutic approaches and scientific studies involving mindfulness meditation have gained traction in areas such as clinical psychology, psychotherapy, and neuroscience. Simultaneously, mindfulness has had a very strong public appeal. This article examines some of the ways in which the medical and scientific meaning of mindfulness is communicated in public and to the public. In particular, it shows how experts in the field of mindfulness neuroscience seek to communicate to the public at (...)
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  12.  8
    Taming Tempests Through Telegraphy and Media Appearances: Science Communication and the Construction of a Swedish Storm-Warning System Before the Great War.Gustav Holmberg - 2007 - Annals of Science 64 (1):77-91.
    The aim of this paper is to explore relations between science and the public. Specifically, Swedish meteorology around 1900 and the rôle of media relations in the construction of a storm-warning system will be discussed. It is argued that science–public interaction can be a factor in the process of establishing priorities in science.
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  13.  3
    Science Communication: A Growth Area in Science and Technology Studies. [REVIEW]Rosaleen Love - 1998 - Metascience 7 (2):281-289.
  14.  89
    Ethics of Science Communication on the Web.M. Clarke - 2009 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9 (1):9-12.
  15.  3
    Nanoethics, Science Communication, and a Fourth Model for Public Engagement.Miah Andy - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):139-152.
    This paper develops a fourth model of public engagement with science, grounded in the principle of nurturing scientific agency through participatory bioethics. It argues that social media is an effective device through which to enable such engagement, as it has the capacity to empower users and transforms audiences into co-producers of knowledge, rather than consumers of content. Social media also fosters greater engagement with the political and legal implications of science, thus promoting the value of scientific citizenship. This (...)
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  16.  12
    Epistemic Trust and the Ethics of Science Communication: Against Transparency, Openness, Sincerity and Honesty.Stephen John - forthcoming - Social Epistemology:1-13.
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    A New Model for Science Communication That Takes Ethical Considerations Into Account.Patricia Osseweijer - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):591-593.
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  18.  6
    INTRODUCTION Science Communication in a Changing World Stephanie Suhr.S. Suhr - 2009 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9 (1):1-4.
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  19.  1
    Popular Science as Cultural Dispositif: On the German Way of Science Communication in the Twentieth Century.Arne Schirrmacher - 2013 - Science in Context 26 (3):473-508.
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  20. The Organization of Academic Science: Communication and Control.Barry Barnes & David Edge - 1982 - In Barry Barnes & David O. Edge (eds.), Science in Context: Readings in the Sociology of Science. MIT Press. pp. 13--20.
     
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  21. The Intervention And Impact of History of Science on Science Communication: From Contents to Standpoints.Jiang Yang - 2013 - Science and Society 2:010.
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  22.  2
    Mode 2 Science and Science Communication: From an Epistemological Perspective.Tetsuji Iseda - 2010 - Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (2):1-17.
  23. Luc Pauwels .Visual Cultures of Science: Rethinking Representational Practices in Knowledge Building and Science Communication.Xix + 299 Pp., Illus., Figs., Tables, Bibls., Index. Lebanon, N.H.: University Press of New England, 2005. $24.95. [REVIEW]Cornelius Borck - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):383-384.
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  24. Climate Sciences and Scientific Method Between Science Communication and Sociology of Knowledge.Andrea Candela - 2010 - Epistemologia 33 (2):235-256.
  25. Motivating Science: Science Communication From a Philosophical, Educational and Cultural Perspective.N. Sanitt (ed.) - 2005 - Pantaneto Press.
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  26. Environmental Pollution and Professional Responsibility: Ibsen's A Public Enemy as a Seminar on Science Communication and Ethics.Hub Zwart - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (3):349-372.
    Dr Stockmann, the principal character in Henrik Ibsen's A Public Enemy, is a classic example of a whistle-blower who, upon detecting and disclosing a serious case of environmental pollution, quickly finds himself transformed from a public benefactor into a political outcast by those in power. If we submit the play to a 'second reading', however, it becomes clear that the ethical intricacies of whistle-blowing are interwoven with epistemological issues. Basically, the play is about the complex task of communicating scientific data (...)
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  27.  53
    The Place of Dialogue Theory in Logic, Computer Science and Communication Studies.Douglas Walton - 2000 - Synthese 123 (3):327-346.
    Dialogue theory, although it has ancient roots, was put forward in the 1970s in logic as astructure that can be useful for helping to evaluate argumentation and informal fallacies.Recently, however, it has been taken up as a broader subject of investigation in computerscience. This paper surveys both the historical and philosophical background of dialoguetheory and the latest research initiatives on dialogue theory in computer science. The main components of dialogue theory are briefly explained. Included is a classification of the (...)
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  28.  31
    Science and Communication.Arto Mutanen - 2010 - Synthesis Philosophica 50 (2):235-249.
    Communication in science is basically established as communication between colloquies within a field of science. Scientific journals, scientific conferences etc. are based on this principle. For example, the notion of peer reviewer supposes such a collegial, monodisciplinary framework. However, multidisciplinary research and engagement with practical problems enforce us to look at the situation in a new way. What can a multidisciplinary discussion mean? How to build up such a multidisciplinary discussion? Is such a discussion merely a (...)
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  29.  3
    Linking Social Communication to Individual Cognition: Communication Science Between Social Constructionism and Radical Constructivism.M. Lenartowicz - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 12 (1):48-50.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Constructivism as a Key Towards Further Understanding of Communication, Culture and Society” by Raivo Palmaru. Upshot: The potential impact of Palmaru’s attempt may bring about a breakthrough across all fields of social science. However, in order for the attempted integrated theory to arrive at a full conceptual operationalisation of the interplay between the two kinds of autopoietic systems, i.e., human consciousness and social systems, a much clearer differentiation is needed of the respective (...)
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  30.  10
    A cognitive and applied linguistic to a science for a transdiciplinary communication.Flor Ángela Tobón Marulanda & López Giraldo - 2013 - Humanidades Médicas 13 (3):586-605.
    Se presentan los resultados de una investigación cualitativa hermenéutica sobre la lingüística cognitiva y la lingüística aplicada, relacionadas con otras ciencias en un contexto específico de la comunidad científica especializada. Desde una visión integral y holística de las ciencias biomédicas y humanas, asimismo, se estudian los lenguajes técnico-científicos de la ciencia y de la tecnología para facilitar la interrelación cognitiva entre las diferentes disciplinas. Este estudio permite crear capacidades para evaluar el acervo léxico en contexto, útil para la transmisión y (...)
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  31.  9
    All Quiet on the Constructivism Front – Or is There a Substantial Contribution of Non-Dualistic Approaches for Communication Science?A. Donk - 2011 - Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):27-29.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “From Objects to Processes: A Proposal to Rewrite Radical Constructivism” by Siegfried J. Schmidt. Upshot: In the 1990s the emergence of radical constructivism as a meta-theory inspired many scientific disciplines. Since more or less simple realistic concepts of the media as mirroring the world prevailed, communication science was challenged to re-think the relation of media and reality as well. Recently, criticism of constructivist media theory has grown, while those constructivst approaches have (...)
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  32. Science et communication.Arto Mutanen - 2010 - Synthesis Philosophica 50 (2):235-249.
    La communication en science repose essentiellement sur la communication entre colloques dans un domaine scientifique donné. Les journaux scientifiques, les conférences etc. sont basés sur ce principelà. Par exemple, le concept de peer review suppose un tel cadre collégial, monodisciplinaire. Cependant, la recherche multidisciplinaire et l’engagement sur les problèmes concrets nous poussent à nous pencher sur la situation d’une manière nouvelle. Que pourrait bien vouloir signifier un débat multidisciplinaire? Comment construire un tel débat? Un tel débat n’estil (...)
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  33.  9
    Communication, Organization, and Science.Jerome Rothstein - 1958 - [Indian Hills, Colo.]Falcon's Wing Press.
  34.  23
    Transformative Communication as a Cultural Tool for Guiding Inquiry Science.Joseph L. Polman & Roy D. Pea - 2001 - Science Education 85 (3):223-238.
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  35.  42
    Soccer Science and the Bayes Community: Exploring the Cognitive Implications of Modern Scientific Communication.Jeff Shrager, Dorrit Billman, Gregorio Convertino, J. P. Massar & Peter Pirolli - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):53-72.
  36. Jaspers, Heidegger, and Arendt: On Politics, Science, and Communication.Babette Babich - 2009 - Existenz 4 (1):1-19.
    Heidegger's 1950 claim to Jaspers (later repeated in his Spiegel interview), that his Nietzsche lectures represented a "resistance" to Nazism is premised on the understanding that he and Jaspers have of the place of science in the Western world. Thus Heidegger can emphasize Nietzsche's epistemology, parsing Nietzsche's will to power, contra Nazi readings, as the metaphysical culmination of the domination of the West by scientism and technologism. It is in this sense that Heidegger argues that German Nazism is "in (...)
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  37. Quantitative Measures of Communication in Science: A Critical Review.D. Edge - 1979 - History of Science 17 (2):102-134.
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  38.  2
    Inquiring Into Communication in Science: Alternative Approaches.Anton Oleinik - 2009 - Science in Context 22 (4):613.
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  39. History as a Universal Science and a Creative Art of Communication.Norman Davies - 2001 - In A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.), Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University. pp. 119.
     
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  40.  64
    Condorcet: Communication/Science/Democracy.György Márkus - 2007 - Critical Horizons 8 (1):18-32.
    Condorcet's arguments concerning the dependence of unhindered scientific development on the presence of democratic conditions still sounds relevant today, because they are based on specific and complex considerations concerning the character of the social enterprise of science that articulates problems that still continue. The implicit dispute between Condorcet and Rousseau is also the first great historical example of the conflict between the Enlightenment and Romanticism, which accompanies the history of modernity, as an unresolved and indeed irresolvable opposition that belongs (...)
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  41.  6
    Bibliography Communication in Science. By A. J. Meadows. London: Butterworths, 1974. Pp. 248. £6.00.J. A. Chaldecott - 1978 - British Journal for the History of Science 11 (1):67.
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  42. Communication, Organisation, and Science.Jerome Rothstein - 1959 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 10 (39):258-258.
     
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  43.  1
    Communication in the Information Society: ICT and the Visibility of Communication Science in the Low Countries.Bouwman Harry - 2003 - Communications - the European Journal of Communication Research 28 (1):61-87.
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  44.  3
    Science et communication : Promettre ou éclairer.Dominique Namur & Sandrine Paillard - 2006 - Hermes 44:107.
    Cet article traite des limites de la communication des chercheurs quand celle-ci porte sur des promesses. Elle est alors susceptible de renforcer les phénomènes de méfiance et de rejet par l'opinion publique. L'article défend l'idée selon laquelle l'objectif de la communication des chercheurs, quand celle-ci s'adresse au public, est avant tout d'éclairer la société sur ses choix, ce qui suppose de créer les conditions de la confiance et du dialogue entre citoyens et scientifiques afin de faire des décisions (...)
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  45.  2
    The Trading Zone Communication of Scientific Knowledge: An Examination of Jesuit Science in China.Xiang Huang - 2005 - Science in Context 18 (3):393.
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  46.  1
    How to Crack a Science Nut More Easily——Analysis on the Communication Techniques of Science Squirrel Website.L. U. O. Hong - 2012 - Science and Society (Misc) 1:013.
  47.  1
    The Development of a Questionnaire to Describe Science Teacher Communication Behavior in Taiwan and Australia.Hsiao‐Ching She & Darrell Fisher - 2000 - Science Education 84 (6):706-726.
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  48. Communication Science: Where Have We Been? Where Are We Now? Where Are We Going? Or: Media Versus Communication Research?Roe Keith - 2003 - Communications - the European Journal of Communication Research 28 (1):53-59.
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  49. The Once and Future Language: Communication, Terminology and the Practice of Science in Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Greece.K. Tampakis - 2015 - History of Science 53 (4):438-455.
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  50. Neoliberal Bias of Science & Technology Communication.Hidetoshi Kihara - 2010 - Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (2):47-65.
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