Results for 'Scientific Representation'

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  1. An Agent-Based Conception of Models and Scientific Representation.Ronald Giere - 2009 - Synthese 172 (2):269–281.
    I argue for an intentional conception of representation in science that requires bringing scientific agents and their intentions into the picture. So the formula is: Agents (1) intend; (2) to use model, M; (3) to represent a part of the world, W; (4) for some purpose, P. This conception legitimates using similarity as the basic relationship between models and the world. Moreover, since just about anything can be used to represent anything else, there can be no unified ontology (...)
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    Representation and Similarity: Suárez on Necessary and Sufficient Conditions of Scientific Representation.Michael Poznic - 2016 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (2):331-347.
    The notion of scientific representation plays a central role in current debates on modeling in the sciences. One or maybe the major epistemic virtue of successful models is their capacity to adequately represent specific phenomena or target systems. According to similarity views of scientific representation, models should be similar to their corresponding targets in order to represent them. In this paper, Suárez’s arguments against similarity views of representation will be scrutinized. The upshot is that the (...)
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  3. There is No Special Problem About Scientific Representation.Cohen Jonathan & Craig Callender - 2006 - Theoria 55 (1):67-85.
    We propose that scientific representation is a special case of a more general notion of representation, and that the relatively well worked-out and plausible theories of the latter are directly applicable to the scien- tific special case. Construing scientific representation in this way makes the so-called “problem of scientific representation” look much less inter- esting than it has seemed to many, and suggests that some of the (hotly contested) debates in the literature are (...)
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  4.  45
    Re-Inflating the Conception of Scientific Representation.Chuang Liu - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (1):41-59.
    This article argues for an anti-deflationist view of scientific representation. Our discussion begins with an analysis of the recent Callender–Cohen deflationary view on scientific representation. We then argue that there are at least two radically different ways in which a thing can be represented: one is purely symbolic, and therefore conventional, and the other is epistemic. The failure to recognize that scientific models are epistemic vehicles rather than symbolic ones has led to the mistaken view (...)
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  5.  72
    Models as Make-Believe: Imagination, Fiction, and Scientific Representation.Adam Toon - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Models as Make-Believe offers a new approach to scientific modelling by looking to an unlikely source of inspiration: the dolls and toy trucks of children's games of make-believe.
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    Modeling Organs with Organs on Chips: Scientific Representation and Engineering Design as Modeling Relations.Michael Poznic - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology 29 (4):357-371.
    On the basis of a case study in bioengineering, this paper proposes a novel perspective on models in science and engineering. This is done with the help of two notions: representation and design. These two notions are interpreted as referring to modeling relations between vehicles and targets that differ in their respective directions of fit. The representation relation has a vehicle-to-target direction of fit and the design relation has a target-to-vehicle direction of fit. The case study of an (...)
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  7. Scientific Representation: Against Similarity and Isomorphism.Mauricio Suarez - 2003 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (3):225-244.
    I argue against theories that attempt to reduce scientific representation to similarity or isomorphism. These reductive theories aim to radically naturalize the notion of representation, since they treat scientist's purposes and intentions as non-essential to representation. I distinguish between the means and the constituents of representation, and I argue that similarity and isomorphism are common but not universal means of representation. I then present four other arguments to show that similarity and isomorphism are not (...)
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  8.  34
    Representation, Scientific.Brandon Boesch - 2015 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The article constitutes a detailed overview of the most important background literature on the topic of scientific representation. It gives a detailed outline of many of the important philosophical accounts of scientific representation. The primary division is between substantive accounts and deflationary/pragmatic accounts. Objections to each type of account are considered. Insights from the literature on modelling are discussed along with an overview of some of the insights from the sociology of science.
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  9. Symbol Systems as Collective Representational Resources: Mary Hesse, Nelson Goodman, and the Problem of Scientific Representation.Axel Gelfert - 2015 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4 (6):52-61.
    This short paper grew out of an observation—made in the course of a larger research project—of a surprising convergence between, on the one hand, certain themes in the work of Mary Hesse and Nelson Goodman in the 1950/60s and, on the other hand, recent work on the representational resources of science, in particular regarding model-based representation. The convergence between these more recent accounts of representation in science and the earlier proposals by Hesse and Goodman consists in the recognition (...)
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  10.  81
    Mathematical Formalisms in Scientific Practice: From Denotation to Model-Based Representation.Axel Gelfert - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (2):272-286.
    The present paper argues that ‘mature mathematical formalisms’ play a central role in achieving representation via scientific models. A close discussion of two contemporary accounts of how mathematical models apply—the DDI account (according to which representation depends on the successful interplay of denotation, demonstration and interpretation) and the ‘matching model’ account—reveals shortcomings of each, which, it is argued, suggests that scientific representation may be ineliminably heterogeneous in character. In order to achieve a degree of unification (...)
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  11. An Inferential Conception of Scientific Representation.Mauricio Suárez - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):767-779.
    This paper defends an inferential conception of scientific representation. It approaches the notion of representation in a deflationary spirit, and minimally characterizes the concept as it appears in science by means of two necessary conditions: its essential directionality and its capacity to allow surrogate reasoning and inference. The conception is defended by showing that it successfully meets the objections that make its competitors, such as isomorphism and similarity, untenable. In addition the inferential conception captures the objectivity of (...)
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  12. Scientific Representation.Mauricio Suárez - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):91-101.
    Scientific representation is a currently booming topic, both in analytical philosophy and in history and philosophy of science. The analytical inquiry attempts to come to terms with the relation between theory and world; while historians and philosophers of science aim to develop an account of the practice of model building in the sciences. This article provides a review of recent work within both traditions, and ultimately argues for a practice-based account of the means employed by scientists to effectively (...)
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  13. Scientific Representation and the Semantic View of Theories.Roman Frigg - 2006 - Theoria 21 (1):49-65.
    It is now part and parcel of the official philosophical wisdom that models are essential to the acquisition and organisation of scientific knowledge. It is also generally accepted that most models represent their target systems in one way or another. But what does it mean for a model to represent its target system? I begin by introducing three conundrums that a theory of scientific representation has to come to terms with and then address the question of whether (...)
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  14.  61
    The Unity of the Manifest and Scientific Image by Self-Representation.Keith Lehrer - 2012 - Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.
    Sellars (1963) distinguished in Empiricism and Philosophy of Mind between ordinary discourse, which expressed his “manifest image”, and scientific discourse, which articulated his “scientific image” of man-in-the-world in a way that is both central and problematic to the rest of his philosophy. Our contention is that the problematic feature of the distinction results from Sellars theory of inner episodes as theoretical entities. On the other hand, as Sellars attempted to account for our noninferential knowledge of such states, particularly (...)
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  15.  69
    The Scientific Use of 'Representation' and 'Function': Avoiding Explanatory Vacuity.Joel Kenton Press - 2008 - Synthese 161 (1):119 - 139.
    Nearly all of the ways philosophers currently attempt to define the terms ‘representation’ and ‘function’ undermine the scientific application of those terms by rendering the scientific explanations in which they occur vacuous. Since this is unacceptable, we must develop analyses of these terms that avoid this vacuity. Robert Cummins argues in this fashion in Representations, Targets, and Attitudes. He accuses ‘use theories’ of representational content of generating vacuous explanations, claims that nearly all current theories of representational content (...)
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  16.  88
    Informational Versus Functional Theories of Scientific Representation.Anjan Chakravartty - 2009 - Synthese 172 (2):197-213.
    Recent work in the philosophy of science has generated an apparent conflict between theories attempting to explicate the nature of scientific representation. On one side, there are what one might call 'informational' views, which emphasize objective relations (such as similarity, isomorphism, and homomorphism) between representations (theories, models, simulations, diagrams, etc.) and their target systems. On the other side, there are what one might call 'functional' views, which emphasize cognitive activities performed in connection with these targets, such as interpretation (...)
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  17. Scientific Representation: A Long Journey From Pragmatics to Pragmatics. [REVIEW]James Ladyman, Otávio Bueno, Mauricio Suárez & Bas van Fraassen - 2011 - Metascience 20 (3):417-442.
    Scientific representation: A long journey from pragmatics to pragmatics Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9465-5 Authors James Ladyman, Department of Philosophy, University of Bristol, 9 Woodland Rd, Bristol, BS8 1TB UK Otávio Bueno, Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA Mauricio Suárez, Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain Bas C. van Fraassen, Philosophy Department, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132, USA Journal (...)
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  18. Scientific Representation and Nominalism: An Empiricist View.Otávio Bueno - 2008 - Principia 12 (2):177-192.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2008v12n2p177 Can a constructive empiricist make sense of scientific representation? Usually, a scientific model is an abstract entity (e.g., formulated in set theory), and scientific representation is conceptualized as an intentional relation between scientific models and certain aspects of the world. On this conception, since both the models and the representation relation are abstract, a constructive empiricist, who is not committed to the existence of abstract entities, would be unable to invoke these notions (...)
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    Scientific Representation.Roman Frigg & James Nguyen - 2016 - In .
    Science provides us with representations of atoms, elementary particles, polymers, populations, genetic trees, economies, rational decisions, aeroplanes, earthquakes, forest fires, irrigation systems, and the world’s climate. It's through these representations that we learn about the world. This entry explores various different accounts of scientific representation, with a particular focus on how scientific models represent their target systems. As philosophers of science are increasingly acknowledging the importance, if not the primacy, of scientific models as representational units of (...)
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    Measurement and Metaphysics in van Fraassen’s Scientific Representation.Sergio Gallegos - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (1):117-131.
    Van Fraassen has presented in Scientific Representation an attractive notion of measurement as an important part of the empiricist structuralism that he endorses. However, he has been criticized on the grounds that both his notion of measurement and his empiricist structuralism force him to do the very thing he objects to in other philosophical projects—to endorse a controversial metaphysics. This paper proposes a defense of van Fraassen by arguing that his project is indeed a ‘metaphysical’ project, but one (...)
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  21.  44
    Similarity and Scientific Representation.Adam Toon - 2012 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (3):241-257.
    The similarity view of scientific representation has recently been subjected to strong criticism. Much of this criticism has been directed against a ?naive? similarity account, which tries to explain representation solely in terms of similarity between scientific models and the world. This article examines the more sophisticated account offered by the similarity view's leading proponent, Ronald Giere. In contrast to the naive account, Giere's account appeals to the role played by the scientists using a scientific (...)
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  22.  3
    Thin Versus Thick Accounts of Scientific Representation.Michael Poznic - forthcoming - Synthese:1-19.
    This paper proposes a novel distinction between accounts of scientific representation: it distinguishes thin accounts from thick accounts. Thin accounts focus on the descriptive aspect of representation whereas thick accounts acknowledge the evaluative aspect of representation. Thin accounts focus on the question of what a representation as such is. Thick accounts start from the question of what an adequate representation is. In this paper, I give two arguments in favor of a thick account, the (...)
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    Lessons From Galileo: The Pragmatic Model of Shared Characteristics of Scientific Representation.Steffen Ducheyne - 2005 - Philosophia Naturalis 42 (2):213-234.
    In this paper I will defend a new account of scientific representation. I will begin by looking at the benefits and drawbacks of two recent accounts on scientific representation: Hughes’ DDI account and Suárez’ inferential account. Next I use some of Galileo’s models in the Discorsi as a heuristic tool for a better account of scientific representation. Next I will present my model. The main idea of my account, which I refer to as the (...)
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    Scientific Representation, Smilarity and Prediction.Gabriele Contessa - manuscript
    In this paper, I consider how different versions of the similarity account of scientific representation might apply to a simple case of scientific representation, in which a model is used to predict the behaviour of a system. I will argue that the similarity account is potentially susceptible to the problem of accidental similarities between the model and the system and that, if it is to avoid this problem, one has to specify which similarities have to hold (...)
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  25. Critical Notice: Bas Van Fraassen, Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective.Bradley Monton - unknown
    This is a review of van Fraassen's new book, _Scientific Representation_.
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  26. Disentangling Scientific Representation.Gabriele Contessa - manuscript
    The main aim of this paper is to disentangle three senses in which we can say that a model represents a system—denotation epistemic representation, and successful epistemic representation--and to individuate what questions arise from each sense of the notion of representation as used in this context. Also, I argue that a model is an epistemic representation of a system only if a user adopts a general interpretation of the model in terms of a system. In the (...)
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    Scientific Representation: A Bibliography.Mauricio Suárez - unknown
    Scientific representation is a booming field nowadays within the philosophy of science, with many papers published regularly on the topic every year, and several yearly conferences and workshops held on related topics. Historically, the topic originates in two different strands in 20th-century philosophy of science. One strand begins in the 1950s, with philosophical interest in the nature of scientific theories. As the received or “syntactic” view gave way to a “semantic” or “structural” conception, representation progressively gained (...)
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  28.  13
    Scientific Representation, Denotation, and Fictional Entities.Mauricio Suárez - unknown
    I critically review RIG Hughes’ Denotation-Demonstration-Interpretation account of scientific representation, focusing in particular on the representation of fictional entities in science. I find the original account lacking, but argue that it can be extended in suitable ways. In particular I argue that an extension of this account that weakens the denotation and interpretation conditions can accommodate fictions. This extension also reveals the essential deflationary nature of scientific representation, by bringing into relief the functional roles of (...)
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  29.  11
    Measurement and Metaphysics in van Fraassen's Scientific Representation.Sergio A. Gallegos - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (1):117-131.
    Van Fraassen has presented in Scientific Representation an attractive notion of measurement as an important part of the empiricist structuralism that he endorses. However, he has been criticized on the grounds that both his notion of measurement and his empiricist structuralism force him to do the very thing he objects to in other philosophical projects — to endorse a controversial metaphysics. This paper proposes a defense of van Fraassen by arguing that his project is indeed a ‘ metaphysical (...)
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  30. There Is No Special Problem About Scientific Representation.Callender Craig & Cohen Jonathan - 2006 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 21 (1):67-85.
    We propose that scientific representation is a special case of a more general notion of representation, and that the relatively well worked-out and plausible theories of the latter are directly applicable to thc scientific special case. Construing scientific representation in this way makes the so-called “problem of scientific representation” look much less interesting than it has seerned to many, and suggests that some of the debates in the literature are concerned with non-issues.
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  31. Scientific Representation and the Semantic View of Theories.Frigg Roman - 2006 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 21 (1):49-65.
    It is now part and parcel of the official philosophical wisdom that models are essential to the acquisition and organisation of scientific knowledge. It is also generally accepted that most models represent their target systems in one way or another. But what does it mean for a model to represent its target system? I begin by introducing three conundrums that a theory of scientific representation has to come to terms with and then address the question of whether (...)
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  32.  70
    Mathematics and Scientific Representation.Christopher Pincock - 2011 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Mathematics plays a central role in much of contemporary science, but philosophers have struggled to understand what this role is or how significant it might be for mathematics and science. In this book Christopher Pincock tackles this perennial question in a new way by asking how mathematics contributes to the success of our best scientific representations. In the first part of the book this question is posed and sharpened using a proposal for how we can determine the content of (...)
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  33. Representation in Scientific Practice.Ronald N. Giere, Michael Lynch & Steve Woolgar - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):113-120.
     
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  34.  43
    Scientific Representation and Perspective.Ioannis Votsis - unknown
    Consider the aims of the following three influential philosophical views. The semantic view of theories aims to supply the proper form and content of scientific theories. Structural realism aspires to delimit the epistemology and ontology of science. Mathematical structuralism seeks to reveal the epistemological and ontological nature of – you guessed it – mathematical objects. Given their divergent aims they may seem like unlikely bedfellows, but the semantic view of theories, structural realism and mathematical structuralism share enough ground to (...)
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  35. Scientific Representation, Interpretation, and Surrogative Reasoning.Gabriele Contessa - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (1):48-68.
    In this paper, I develop Mauricio Suárez’s distinction between denotation, epistemic representation, and faithful epistemic representation. I then outline an interpretational account of epistemic representation, according to which a vehicle represents a target for a certain user if and only if the user adopts an interpretation of the vehicle in terms of the target, which would allow them to perform valid (but not necessarily sound) surrogative inferences from the model to the system. The main difference between the (...)
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  36. Scientific Representation and Realism.Michel Ghins - 2012 - Principia 15 (3):461-474.
    After a brief presentation of what I take to be the representational démarche in science, I stress the fundamental role of true judgements in model construction. The success and correctness of a representation rests on the truth of judgements which attribute properties to real targeted entities, called “ontic judgements”. I then present what van Fraassen calls “the Loss of Reality objection”. After criticizing his dissolution of the objection, I offer an alternative way of answering the Loss of Reality objection (...)
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  37. Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective.C. Van Fraassen Bas - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
  38.  11
    Representation of the Microcosm: The Claim for Objectivity in 19th Century Scientific Microphotography.Olaf Breidbach - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):221 - 250.
    Microphotography was one of the earliest applications of photography in science: The first monograph on tissue organization illustrated with microphotographs was published in 1845. In the 1860s, a large number of introductions to scientific microphotography were published by anatomists. They argued that microphotography was a means of documenting the results of microscopic analysis, uncontaminated by the subjectivity of the observer. In the early decades of the 19th century, before the general acceptance of cell theory, such a technique was of (...)
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  39.  36
    Factive Scientific Understanding Without Accurate Representation.Collin C. Rice - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (1):81-102.
    This paper analyzes two ways idealized biological models produce factive scientific understanding. I then argue that models can provide factive scientific understanding of a phenomenon without providing an accurate representation of the features of their real-world target system. My analysis of these cases also suggests that the debate over scientific realism needs to investigate the factive scientific understanding produced by scientists’ use of idealized models rather than the accuracy of scientific models themselves.
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  40.  49
    Models, Truth and Realism: Assessing Bas van Fraassen's Views on Scientific Representation.Michel Ghins - 2011 - Manuscrito 34 (1):207-232.
    This paper is devoted to an analysis of some aspects of Bas van Fraassen’s views on representation. While I agree with most of his claims, I disagree on the following three issues. Firstly, I contend that some isomorphism between the representor and what is represented is a universal necessary condition for the success of any representation, even in the case of misrepresentation. Secondly, I argue that the so-called “semantic” or “model-theoretic” construal of theories does not give proper due (...)
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  41.  24
    A Few Words on Representation and Meaning. Comments on H.A. Simon's Paper on Scientific Discovery.Roberto Cordeschi - 1992 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 6 (1):19 – 21.
    My aim here is to raise a few questions concerning the problem of representation in scientific discovery computer programs. Representation, as Simon says in his paper, "imposes constraints upon the phenomena that allow the mechanisms to be inferred from the data". The issue is obviously barely outlined by Simon in his paper, while it is addressed in detail in the book by Langley, Simon, Bradshaw and Zytkow (1987), to which I shall refer in this note. Nevertheless, their (...)
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  42.  14
    Structuralism About Scientific Representation.Martin Thomson-Jones - 2011 - In Alisa Bokulich & Peter Bokulich (eds.), Scientific Structuralism. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 119--141.
  43.  3
    Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective.B. C. van Fraassen - 2010 - Analysis 70 (3):511-514.
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  44.  5
    An Agent-Based Conception of Models and Scientific Representation.Ronald Giere - 2009 - Synthese 172 (2):269-281.
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  45.  75
    Precis of Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective. [REVIEW]Fraassen Bas C. Van - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 150 (3):425 - 428.
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  46.  53
    More Telltale Signs: What Attention to Representation Reveals About Scientific Explanation.Andrea I. Woody - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):780-793.
    This essay explores the connection between representation and explanation in the sciences. I suggest that scientific representation schemes be viewed as pragmatic tools for acquiring the sort of articulated awareness that is the hallmark of nontrivial knowledge. Crystal field theory in chemistry illustrates this perspective. Certain representations achieve the status of being paradigmatically explanatory, thereby shaping models of intelligibility. In turn, these explanatory preferences serve largely to define and differentiate disciplinary communities by implicitly endorsing particular epistemic aims (...)
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  47. Review of Bas C. Van Fraassen: Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective[REVIEW]Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (11).
  48. The Insidiously Enchanted Forrest. Essay Review of 'Scientific Representation' by Bas C. Van Fraassen.F. A. Muller - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (3):268-272.
  49.  36
    Scientific Representation.Kathleen Okruhlik - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):671-694.
  50.  44
    Essay Review: Scientific Representation and Empiricist Structuralism*:Scientific Representation: Paradoxes of Perspective.Ronald N. Giere - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (1):101-111.
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