Results for 'Scientism'

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  1.  2
    The Social Scientist at Nazarene Institutions.A. T. Scientist - 2011 - Telos: The Destination for Nazarene Higher Education 1.
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  2. Scientism: Philosophy and the Infatuation with Science.Tom SORELL - 1991 - Routledge.
    SCIENTISM AND 'SCIENTIFIC EMPIRICISM' WHAT IS SCIENTISM? Scientism is the belief that science, especially natural science, is much the most valuable part of ...
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  3. Scientism and Pseudoscience: A Philosophical Commentary.Massimo Pigliucci - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):569-575.
    The term “scientism” is used in a variety of ways with both negative and positive connotations. I suggest that some of these uses are inappropriate, as they aim simply at dismissing without argument an approach that a particular author does not like. However, there are legitimate negative uses of the term, which I explore by way of an analogy with the term “pseudoscience.” I discuss these issues by way of a recent specific example provided by a controversy in the (...)
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  4. The Scientist Qua Scientist Makes Value Judgments.Richard Rudner - 1953 - Philosophy of Science 20 (1):1-6.
  5.  69
    Is Scientism Epistemically Vicious?Ian James Kidd - 2017 - In Jeroen de Ridder, Rik Peels & René van Woudenberg (eds.), Scientism: Prospects and Problems. Oxford University Press. pp. 222-249.
    This chapter offers a virtue epistemological framework for making sense of the common complaint that scientism is arrogant, dogmatic, or otherwise epistemically vicious. After characterising scientism in terms of stances, I argue that their components can include epistemically vicious dispositions, with the consequence that an agent who adopts such stances can be led to manifest epistemic vices. The main focus of the chapter is the vice of closed-mindedness, but I go on to consider the idea that arrogance and (...)
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  6. Moderate Scientism in Philosophy.Buckwalter Wesley & John Turri - forthcoming - In Jereon de Ridder, Rik Peels & René van Woudenberg (eds.), Scientism: Prospects and Problems. Oxford University Press.
    Moderate scientism is the view that empirical science can help answer questions in nonscientific disciplines. In this paper, we evaluate moderate scientism in philosophy. We review several ways that science has contributed to research in epistemology, action theory, ethics, philosophy of language, and philosophy of mind. We also review several ways that science has contributed to our understanding of how philosophers make judgments and decisions. Based on this research, we conclude that the case for moderate philosophical scientism (...)
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  7.  35
    Scientism as a Social Response to the Problem of Suicide.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):613-622.
    As one component of a broader social and normative response to the problem of suicide, scientism served to minimize sociopolitical and religious conflict around the issue. As such, it embodied, and continues to embody, a number of interests and values, as well as serving important social functions. It is thus comparable with other normative frameworks and can be appraised, from an ethical perspective, in light of these values, interests, and functions. This work examines the key values, interests, and functions (...)
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  8. The Scientist as Child.Alison Gopnik - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (4):485-514.
    This paper argues that there are powerful similarities between cognitive development in children and scientific theory change. These similarities are best explained by postulating an underlying abstract set of rules and representations that underwrite both types of cognitive abilities. In fact, science may be successful largely because it exploits powerful and flexible cognitive devices that were designed by evolution to facilitate learning in young children. Both science and cognitive development involve abstract, coherent systems of entities and rules, theories. In both (...)
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  9.  70
    Aesthetics, Scientism, and Ordinary Language: A Comparison Between Wittgenstein and Heidegger.Andreas Vrahimis - 2018 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 10:659-684.
    Wittgenstein and Heidegger’s objections against the possibility of an aesthetic science were influential on different sides of the analytic/continental divide. Heidegger’s anti-scientism is tied up with a critique of the reduction of the work of art to an object of aesthetic experience. This leads him to an aletheic view of artworks which precedes and exceeds any possible aesthetic reduction. Wittgenstein too rejects the relevance of causal explanations, psychological or physiological, to aesthetic questions. His appeal to ordinary language provides the (...)
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  10.  73
    The Scientist Qua Policy Advisor Makes Value Judgments.Katie Siobhan Steele - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (5):893-904.
    Richard Rudner famously argues that the communication of scientific advice to policy makers involves ethical value judgments. His argument has, however, been rightly criticized. This article revives Rudner’s conclusion, by strengthening both his lines of argument: we generalize his initial assumption regarding the form in which scientists must communicate their results and complete his ‘backup’ argument by appealing to the difference between private and public decisions. Our conclusion that science advisors must, for deep-seated pragmatic reasons, make value judgments is further (...)
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  11. Weak Scientism Defended Once More: A Reply to Wills.Moti Mizrahi - 2018 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 7 (6):41-50.
    Bernard Wills (2018) joins Christopher Brown (2017, 2018) in criticizing my defense of Weak Scientism (Mizrahi 2017a, 2017b, 2018a). Unfortunately, it seems that Wills did not read my latest defense of Weak Scientism carefully, nor does he cite any of the other papers in my exchange with Brown.
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  12. Scientism, Philosophy and Brain-Based Learning.Gregory M. Nixon - 2013 - Northwest Journal of Teacher Education 11 (1):113-144.
    [This is an edited and improved version of "You Are Not Your Brain: Against 'Teaching to the Brain'" previously published in *Review of Higher Education and Self-Learning* 5(15), Summer 2012.] Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation (...)
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  13. Scientism. Science, Ethics and Religion.Mikael Stenmark - 2001 - Ashgate.
  14.  34
    Scientist: The Story of a Word.Sydney Ross - 1962 - Annals of Science 18 (2):65-85.
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  15.  36
    Scientism in Chinese Thought, 1900-1950.D. W. Y. KWOK - 1965 - New York: Biblo & Tannen.
  16. Six Signs of Scientism.Susan Haack - 2012 - Logos and Episteme 3 (1):75-95.
    As the English word “scientism” is currently used, it is a trivial verbal truth that scientism—an inappropriately deferential attitude to science—should be avoided. But it is a substantial question when, and why, deference to the sciences is inappropriate or exaggerated. This paper tries to answer that question by articulating “six signs of scientism”: the honorific use of “science” and its cognates; using scientific trappings purely decoratively; preoccupation with demarcation; preoccupation with “scientific method”; looking to the sciences for (...)
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  17.  24
    Scientism in Medical Education and the Improvement of Medical Care: Opioids, Competencies, and Social Accountability.Lynette Reid - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):155-170.
    Scientism in medical education distracts educators from focusing on the content of learning; it focuses attention instead on individual achievement and validity in its measurement. I analyze the specific form that scientism takes in medicine and in medical education. The competencies movement attempts to challenge old “scientistic” views of the role of physicians, but in the end it has invited medical educators to focus on validity in the measurement of individual performance for attitudes and skills that medicine resists (...)
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  18. Scientism: Prospects and Problems.Jeroen de Ridder, Rik Peels & René van Woudenberg (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
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  19. Person as Scientist, Person as Moralist.Joshua Knobe - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):315.
    It has often been suggested that people’s ordinary capacities for understanding the world make use of much the same methods one might find in a formal scientific investigation. A series of recent experimental results offer a challenge to this widely-held view, suggesting that people’s moral judgments can actually influence the intuitions they hold both in folk psychology and in causal cognition. The present target article distinguishes two basic approaches to explaining such effects. One approach would be to say that the (...)
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  20.  28
    Scientism, Deconstruction, and Nihilism.Nicholas Capaldi - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (4):563-575.
    I show how scientism leads to deconstruction and both, in turn, lead to nihilism. Nihilism constitutes a denial both of the existence of fallacious moral reasoning and the existence of a moral dimension to fallacious reasoning. I argue against all of these positions by maintaining that (1) there is a pre-theoretical framework of norms within which technical thinking function, (2) the pre-theoretical framework cannot itself be technically conceptualized, and (3) the explication of this framework permits us to identify both (...)
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  21.  17
    Scientism, Social Praxis, and Overcoming Metaphysics: A Debate Between Logical Empiricism and the Frankfurt School.Andreas Vrahimis - 2020 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 10 (2):000-000.
    During the 1930s, while both movements were fleeing from persecution by the Nazis, the Vienna Circle and the Frankfurt School planned to collaborate. The plan failed, and in its stead Horkheimer published a critique of the Vienna Circle in “The Latest Attack on Metaphysics” (written in collaboration with Adorno, though he is not credited as an author). This paper will analyse Horkheimer’s (and Adorno’s) article, and the ensuing dialogue with Neurath. The Frankfurt School’s critical stance towards the Vienna Circle can (...)
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  22. A Conceptual Map of Scientism.Rik Peels - manuscript
    I argue that scientism in general is best understood as the thesis that the boundaries of the natural sciences should be expanded in order to include academic disciplines or realms of life that are widely considered not to belong to the realm of science. However, every adherent and critic of scientism should make clear which of the many varieties of scientism she adheres to or criticizes. In doing so, she should specify whether she is talking about (a) (...)
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  23.  47
    Between Scientism and Abstractionism in the Metaphysics of Emergence.Jessica Wilson - 2019 - In Sophie Gibb, Robin Hendry & Tom Lancaster (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Emergence. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 157-176.
    I discuss certain representative accounts of metaphysical emergence falling into three broad categories, assessing their prospects for satisfying certain criteria; the ensuing dialectic has a bit of the Goldilocks fable about it. At one end of the spectrum are what I call ‘scientistic’ accounts, which characterize metaphysical emergence by appeal to one or another specific feature commonly registered in scientific descriptions of seeming cases of emergence; such accounts, I argue, typically fail to provide a clear basis for ensuring incompatibility with (...)
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  24. In Defense of Weak Scientism: A Reply to Brown.Moti Mizrahi - 2017 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 6 (2):9-22.
    In “What’s So Bad about Scientism?” (Mizrahi 2017), I argue that Weak Scientism, the view that “Of all the knowledge we have, scientific knowledge is the best knowledge” (Mizrahi 2017, 354; emphasis in original) is a defensible position. That is to say, Weak Scientism “can be successfully defended against objections” (Mizrahi 2017, 354). In his response to Mizrahi (2017), Christopher Brown (2017) provides more objections against Weak Scientism, and thus another opportunity for me to show that (...)
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  25.  22
    Scientism and Scientific Thinking.Renia Gasparatou - 2017 - Science & Education 26 (7-9):799-812.
    The move from respecting science to scientism, i.e., the idealization of science and scientific method, is simple: We go from acknowledging the sciences as fruitful human activities to oversimplifying the ways they work, and accepting a fuzzy belief that Science and Scientific Method, will give us a direct pathway to the true making of the world, all included. The idealization of science is partly the reason why we feel we need to impose the so-called scientific terminologies and methodologies to (...)
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  26.  74
    Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist.Stephen Toulmin - 1950 - Science and Society 14 (4):353-360.
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  27.  13
    Scientism, Conflicts of Interest, and the Marginalization of Ethics in Medical Education.Christopher Mayes, Jane Williams, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):939-944.
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  28. In Defence of Scientism.Don Ross, James Ladyman & David Spurrett - 2007 - In James Ladyman (ed.), Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized. Oxford University Press.
  29.  13
    Anti-Scientism, Technoscience and Philosophy of Technology: Wittgenstein and Lyotard.Michael A. Peters - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (12):1225-1232.
    Volume 52, Issue 12, November 2020, Page 1225-1232.
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  30.  96
    Naturalism, Scientism and the Independence of Epistemology.James Maffie - 1995 - Erkenntnis 43 (1):1 - 27.
    Naturalists seek continuity between epistemology and science. Critics argue this illegitimately expands science into epistemology and commits the fallacy of scientism. Must naturalists commit this fallacy? I defend a conception of naturalized epistemology which upholds the non-identity of epistemic ends, norms, and concepts with scientific evidential ends, norms, and concepts. I argue it enables naturalists to avoid three leading scientistic fallacies: dogmatism, one dimensionalism, and granting science an epistemic monopoly.
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  31.  13
    Scientist, Quo Vadis Without Ethics? An Introduction to Special Collection on “Environmental Ethics: Issues and Perspectives From Romania”.Ruxandra Malina Petrescu-Mag, Dacinia Crina Petrescu & Alexandru Ozunu - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (1):1-4.
    An introduction to special collection on “Environmental Ethics: Issues and Perspectives from Romania”.
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  32.  51
    Wittgenstein and Scientism.Jonathan Beale & Ian James Kidd (eds.) - 2014 - London: Routledge.
    Wittgenstein criticised prevailing attitudes toward the sciences. The target of his criticisms was ‘scientism’: what he described as ‘the overestimation of science’. This collection is the first study of Wittgenstein’s anti-scientism - a theme in his work that is clearly central to his thought yet strikingly neglected by the existing literature. The book explores the philosophical basis of Wittgenstein’s anti-scientism; how this anti-scientism helps us understand Wittgenstein’s philosophical aims; and how this underlies his later conception of (...)
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  33.  27
    Spinoza: Scientist and Theorist of Scientific Method.David Savan - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 95--123.
  34.  47
    The Scientist’s Education and a Civic Conscience.Kelling J. Donald & Jeffrey Kovac - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1229-1240.
    A civic science curriculum is advocated. We discuss practical mechanisms for (and highlight the possible benefits of) addressing the relationship between scientific knowledge and civic responsibility coextensively with rigorous scientific content. As a strategy, we suggest an in-course treatment of well known (and relevant) historical and contemporary controversies among scientists over science policy or the use of sciences. The scientific content of the course is used to understand the controversy and to inform the debate while allowing students to see the (...)
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  35.  35
    Scientism and Technology as Religions.Rustum Roy - 2005 - Zygon 40 (4):835-844.
  36.  10
    The Scientist as Philosopher.Friedel Weinert - unknown
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  37. The Scientist in Vivo: How Scientists Think and Reason in the Laboratory.Kevin Dunbar - 1999 - In L. Magnani, N. J. Nersessian & P. Thagard (eds.), Model-Based Reasoning in Scientific Discovery. Kluwer/Plenum. pp. 89--98.
     
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  38.  40
    Scrutinizing Scientism From a Hermeneutic Point of View.Dimitri Ginev - 2013 - Social Epistemology 27 (1):68 - 89.
    The paper suggests a critique of scientism by revealing the existential genesis of knowledge-constitutive interests in scientific research. This scenario of overcoming scientism is spelled out in terms of the doctrine of cognitive existentialism. On the doctrine?s central claim, a knowledge-constitutive interest is not fixed and determined by a strongly situated epistemic position that is distinguished by invariant norms of theorizing, methodological devices, cognitive aims, goals, and values. In reflecting upon its situated transcendence, scientific research has a potentiality (...)
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  39.  38
    The Scientist as Adult.Ronald N. Giere - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (4):538-541.
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  40.  48
    The Scientist as God: A Typological Study of a Literary Motif, 1818 to the Present by Sven Wagner.John Hedley Brooke - 2013 - Zygon 48 (1):236-238.
  41. What is Scientism?Mikael Stenmark - 1997 - Religious Studies 33 (1):15-32.
    In this article I try to define more precisely what scientism is and how it is related to a traditional religion such as Christianity. By first examining the writing of a number of contemporary natural scientists (Francis Crick, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan and Edward O. Wilson), I show that the concept can be given numerous different meanings. I propose and defend a distinction between epistemic, rationalistic, ontological, axiological and redemptive scientism and it is also explained why (...)
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  42.  32
    Science and Scientism in Popular Science Writing.Jeroen De Ridder - 2014 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3 (12):23–39.
    If one is to believe recent popular scientific accounts of developments in physics, biology, neuroscience, and cognitive science, most of the perennial philosophical questions have been wrested from the hands of philosophers by now, only to be resolved (or sometimes dissolved) by contemporary science. To mention but a few examples of issues that science has now allegedly dealt with: the origin and destiny of the universe, the origin of human life, the soul, free will, morality, and religion. My aim in (...)
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  43.  10
    Scientism in Experimental Music Research.Thomas A. Regelski - forthcoming - Philosophy of Music Education Review.
  44. Thinking Like a Scientist: Innateness as a Case Study.Joshua Knobe & Richard Samuels - 2013 - Cognition 126 (1):72-86.
    The concept of innateness appears in systematic research within cognitive science, but it also appears in less systematic modes of thought that long predate the scientific study of the mind. The present studies therefore explore the relationship between the properly scientific uses of this concept and its role in ordinary folk understanding. Studies 1-4 examined the judgments of people with no specific training in cognitive science. Results showed (a) that judgments about whether a trait was innate were not affected by (...)
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  45.  17
    Scientism in Chinese Thought 1900-1950.E. H. S. - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (4):609.
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  46.  38
    The Scientist as Statesman: Biologists and Third World Health.John J. Carvalho - 2007 - Zygon 42 (2):289-300.
  47.  20
    Scientism: The New Orthodoxy. [REVIEW]Jeroen de Ridder - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):93-95.
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  48. Denying Evolution: Creation, Scientism, and the Nature of Science.Massimo Pigliucci - 2002 - Sinauer.
    Denying Evolution aims at taking a fresh look at the evolution–creation controversy. It presents a truly “balanced” treatment, not in the sense of treating creationism as a legitimate scientific theory (it demonstrably is not), but in the sense of dividing the blame for the controversy equally between creationists and scientists—the former for subscribing to various forms of anti-intellectualism, the latter for discounting science education and presenting science as scientism to the public and the media. The central part of the (...)
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  49.  25
    Who is the Scientist-Subject? A Critique of the Neo-Kantian Scientist-Subject in Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison’s Objectivity.Esha Shah - 2017 - Minerva 55 (1):117-138.
    The main focus of this essay is to closely engage with the role of scientist-subjectivity in the making of objectivity in Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison’s book Objectivity, and Daston’s later and earlier works On Scientific Observation and The Moral Economy of Science. I have posited four challenges to the neo-Kantian and Foucauldian constructions of the co-implication of psychology and epistemology presented in these texts. Firstly, following Jacques Lacan’s work, I have argued that the subject of science constituted by the (...)
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  50.  69
    Taking Science Seriously Without Scientism: A Response to Taede Smedes.Ian G. Barbour - 2008 - Zygon 43 (1):259-269.
    . In responding to Taede Smedes, I first examine his thesis that the recent dialogue between science and religion has been dominated by scientism and does not take theology seriously. I then consider his views on divine action, free will and determinism, and process philosophy. Finally I use the fourfold typology of Conflict, Independence, Dialogue, and Integration to discuss his proposal for the future of science and religion.
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