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Scott Burris [27]Scott C. Burris [2]
  1.  5
    Integrating Law and Social Epidemiology.Scott Burris, Ichiro Kawachi & Austin Sarat - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):510-521.
    Social epidemiology has made a powerful case that health determined not just by individual-level factors such as our genetic make-up, access to medical services, or lifestyle choices, but also by social conditions, including the economy, law, and culture. Indeed, at the level of populations, evidence suggests that these “structural” factors are the predominant influences on health. Legal scholars in public health, including those in the health and human rights movement, have contended that human rights, laws, and legal practices are powerfully (...)
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  2.  21
    Introduction: Merging Law, Human Rights, and Social Epidemiology.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):498-509.
  3.  24
    Assessing Social Risks Prior to Commencement of a Clinical Trial: Due Diligence or Ethical Inflation?Scott Burris & Corey Davis - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):48-54.
    Assessing social risks has proven difficult for IRBs. We undertook a novel effort to empirically investigate social risks before an HIV prevention trial among drug users in Thailand and China. The assessment investigated whether law, policies and enforcement strategies would place research subjects at significantly elevated risk of arrest, incarceration, physical harm, breach of confidentiality, or loss of access to health care relative to drug users not participating in the research. The study validated the investigator's concern that drug users were (...)
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  4.  8
    Introduction: Merging Law, Human Rights, and Social Epidemiology.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):498-509.
  5.  22
    A Framework Convention on Global Health: Social Justice Lite, or a Light on Social Justice?Scott Burris & Evan D. Anderson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):580-593.
    With the publication of the final report of the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, it becomes clear that there is considerable convergence between a policy agenda rooted on social epidemiology and one rooted in a concern for human rights. As commentators like Jonathan Mann have argued, concern for human rights and the achievement of social justice can inform and improve public health. In this article, we ask a different question: what does a health perspective adds to the (...)
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  6.  7
    Evaluating the Impact of Criminal Laws on HIV Risk Behavior.Zita Lazzarini, Sarah Bray & Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):239-253.
    Criminal law is one of the regulatory tools being used in the United States to influence risk behavior by people who have HIV/AIDS. Several different types of laws have been or could be used in this way These include:HIV-specific exposure and transmission laws — i.e., laws that explicitly mention and exclusively apply to conduct by people with HIV;public health statutes prohibiting conduct that would expose others to communicable diseases and/or sexually transmitted diseases ; andgeneral criminal laws governing attempted murder and (...)
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  7.  31
    A Framework Convention on Global Health: Social Justice Lite, or a Light on Social Justice?Scott Burris & Evan D. Anderson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):580-593.
    With the publication of the final report of the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, it becomes clear that there is considerable convergence between a policy agenda rooted on social epidemiology and one rooted in a concern for human rights. As commentators like Jonathan Mann have argued, concern for human rights and the achievement of social justice can inform and improve public health. In this article, we ask a different question: what does a health perspective adds to the (...)
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  8.  10
    Evaluating the Impact of Criminal Laws on HIV Risk Behavior.Zita Lazzarini, Sarah Bray & Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):239-253.
    Criminal law is one of the regulatory tools being used in the United States to influence risk behavior by people who have HIV/AIDS. Several different types of laws have been or could be used in this way These include:HIV-specific exposure and transmission laws — i.e., laws that explicitly mention and exclusively apply to conduct by people with HIV;public health statutes prohibiting conduct that would expose others to communicable diseases and/or sexually transmitted diseases ; andgeneral criminal laws governing attempted murder and (...)
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  9.  21
    Disease Stigma in U.S. Public Health Law.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):179-190.
    Stigma has become an important concept in public health law. It is widely accepted that certain diseases are disfavored in society, leading to discrimination against people identified with them, which in turn has the tendency to drive an epidemic underground—i.e., to make it more difficult for voluntary public health programs to reach and succeed among populations bent on concealing their disease or risk status. The need to reduce stigma and its effects has been used to justify the passage of privacy (...)
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  10.  10
    Disease Stigma in U.S. Public Health Law.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):179-190.
    Stigma has become an important concept in public health law. It is widely accepted that certain diseases are disfavored in society, leading to discrimination against people identified with them, which in turn has the tendency to drive an epidemic underground—i.e., to make it more difficult for voluntary public health programs to reach and succeed among populations bent on concealing their disease or risk status. The need to reduce stigma and its effects has been used to justify the passage of privacy (...)
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  11.  35
    The Role of State Law in Protecting Human Subjects of Public Health Research and Practice.Scott Burris, Lance Gable, Lesley Stone & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):654-662.
    “Public health practice” consists of activities and Programs managed by public health agencies to promote health and prevent disease, injury, and disability. Some of these activities might be deemed to fit within the broad definition of “research” under federal regulations, known as the Common Rule, designed to protect human research subjects. The Common Rule defines research as “a systeniatic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” Public health activities that might under some (...)
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  12.  10
    Other Branches of Science Are Necessary to Form a Lawyer: Teaching Public Health Law in Law School.Richard A. Goodman, Zita Lazzarini, Anthony D. Moulton, Scott Burris, Nanette R. Elster, Paul A. Locke & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):298-301.
    Over two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson suggested the need for a broader legal curriculum. As the twenty-first century begins, the practice of law will increasingly demand interdisciplinary knowledge and collaboration — between those trained in law and a broad range of scientific and technical fields, including engineering, biology, genetics, ethics, and the social sciences. The practice of public health law provides a model for both the substantive integration of law with science, and for the way its practitioners work. In (...)
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  13.  4
    Health and the Governance of Security: A Tale of Two Systems.Sevgi Aral, Scott Burris & Clifford Shearing - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):632-643.
    The provision of police services and the suppression of crime is one of the first functions of civil government. Article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights speaks of a right to “security of person.” “The term ‘police’ traditionally connoted social organization, civil authority, or formation of a political community—the control and regulation of affairs affecting the general order and welfare of society,” including the protection of public health. Civil dispute resolution is also an important part of a system (...)
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  14.  11
    The Role of State Law in Protecting Human Subjects of Public Health Research and Practice.Scott Burris, Lance Gable, Lesley Stone & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):654-662.
    “Public health practice” consists of activities and Programs managed by public health agencies to promote health and prevent disease, injury, and disability. Some of these activities might be deemed to fit within the broad definition of “research” under federal regulations, known as the Common Rule, designed to protect human research subjects. The Common Rule defines research as “a systeniatic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” Public health activities that might under some (...)
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  15.  19
    Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health: The Work of the Public Health Law Research National Program Office.Scott C. Burris & Evan D. Anderson - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):15-20.
    No one who attended the 2010 national public health law conference hosted by the Public Health Law Association and the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics could miss the sense of excitement and momentum. The revival of this annual public health law meeting, with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the energetic leadership of the PHLA president and board, ASLME’s expert guidance, and a rousing address by Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and (...)
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  16.  17
    Thoughts on the Law and the Public's Health.Scott Burris - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (2):141-147.
    One understanding of health conceives of it as a state of freedom from pathology, achieved by an individual, through the mediation of a doctor. On this view, improvements in health flow from the application of science to specific ills of the body, and access to medical care is the chief determinant of health. This “medicalized” view of health underlies the current debate over medical care payment reform. This is the dominant way of talking about health.An alternative is the view of (...)
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  17.  9
    Other Branches of Science Are Necessary to Form a Lawyer: Teaching Public Health Law in Law School.Richard A. Goodman, Zita Lazzarini, Anthony D. Moulton, Scott Burris, Nanette R. Elster, Paul A. Locke & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):298-301.
    Over two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson suggested the need for a broader legal curriculum. As the twenty-first century begins, the practice of law will increasingly demand interdisciplinary knowledge and collaboration — between those trained in law and a broad range of scientific and technical fields, including engineering, biology, genetics, ethics, and the social sciences. The practice of public health law provides a model for both the substantive integration of law with science, and for the way its practitioners work. In (...)
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  18.  6
    Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health: The Work of the Public Health Law Research National Program Office.Scott C. Burris & Evan D. Anderson - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):15-20.
    No one who attended the 2010 national public health law conference hosted by the Public Health Law Association and the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics could miss the sense of excitement and momentum. The revival of this annual public health law meeting, with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the energetic leadership of the PHLA president and board, ASLME’s expert guidance, and a rousing address by Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and (...)
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  19.  10
    Creating Legal Data for Public Health Monitoring and Evaluation: Delphi Standards for Policy Surveillance.David Presley, Thomas Reinstein, Damika Webb-Barr & Scott Burris - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (S1):27-31.
    Surveillance in public health is the means by which people who are responsible for preventing or controlling threats to health get the timely, ongoing, and reliable information they need about the occurrence, antecedents, time course, geographic spread, consequences, and nature of these threats among the populations they serve. “Policy surveillance” is the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and dissemination of information about laws and other policies of health importance.
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  20.  11
    Applying the Common Rule to Public Health Agencies: Questions and Tentative Answers About a Separate Regulatory Regime.Scott Burris, James Buehler & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):638-653.
    No one questions the importance of protecting human subjects of research, but over the past few years dissatisfaction has surfaced with the manner in which the protection is conferred by the federal regulatory system referred to as “The Common Rule. ” Some of the criticism surfaces in print. Some bubbles out anecdotally in conversations among researchers, with complaints about the review process being virtually inevitable whenever the topic arises. Like those in other disciplines that differ more or less dramatically from (...)
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  21.  8
    Changing Law From Barrier to Facilitator of Opioid Overdose Prevention.Corey Davis, Damika Webb & Scott Burris - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (s1):33-36.
    Drug overdose has recently surpassed motor vehicle accidents to become the leading cause of unintentional injury death in the United States. The epidemic is largely driven by opioids such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone, which kill more Americans than heroin and cocaine combined. The demographics of overdose have changed over the past few decades as well: according to the latest data, the average overdose victim is now a non-Hispanic white man aged 45-54.These deaths — over 16,000 per year — are (...)
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  22.  12
    Applying the Common Rule to Public Health Agencies: Questions and Tentative Answers About a Separate Regulatory Regime.Scott Burris, James Buehler & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):638-653.
    No one questions the importance of protecting human subjects of research, but over the past few years dissatisfaction has surfaced with the manner in which the protection is conferred by the federal regulatory system referred to as “The Common Rule. ” Some of the criticism surfaces in print. Some bubbles out anecdotally in conversations among researchers, with complaints about the review process being virtually inevitable whenever the topic arises. Like those in other disciplines that differ more or less dramatically from (...)
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  23.  10
    Thoughts on the Law and the Public's Health.Scott Burris - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (2):141-147.
    One understanding of health conceives of it as a state of freedom from pathology, achieved by an individual, through the mediation of a doctor. On this view, improvements in health flow from the application of science to specific ills of the body, and access to medical care is the chief determinant of health. This “medicalized” view of health underlies the current debate over medical care payment reform. This is the dominant way of talking about health.An alternative is the view of (...)
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  24.  8
    HIV Education and the Law: A Critical Review.Scott Burris - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):377-391.
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  25.  8
    HIV Education and the Law: A Critical Review.Scott Burris - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):377-391.
  26.  26
    Opioid Treatment Agreements Are the Answer. What Is the Question?Scott Burris & Evan Anderson - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):15-17.
  27.  18
    A Modest Proposal.Scott Burris & Corey Davis - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):3-4.
    Assessing social risks has proven difficult for IRBs. We undertook a novel effort to empirically investigate social risks before an HIV prevention trial among drug users in Thailand and China. The assessment investigated whether law, policies and enforcement strategies would place research subjects at significantly elevated risk of arrest, incarceration, physical harm, breach of confidentiality, or loss of access to health care relative to drug users not participating in the research. The study validated the investigator's concern that drug users were (...)
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  28.  8
    Taking Rights Seriously in Health.Scott Burris, Zita Lazzarini & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):490-491.
    Few now question that population health is significantly shaped by social ecology. Power, wealth, and social status clearly matter: Their enactment in daily life makes them fundamental social determinants of health. Important as it is that we accept the broad importance of social factors in health, it is not enough. Our current grasp of the importance of social factors in health has to be strengthened by research that more precisely delineates the workings of social health through social processes, and the (...)
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