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  1.  15
    Scientism as a Social Response to the Problem of Suicide.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):613-622.
    As one component of a broader social and normative response to the problem of suicide, scientism served to minimize sociopolitical and religious conflict around the issue. As such, it embodied, and continues to embody, a number of interests and values, as well as serving important social functions. It is thus comparable with other normative frameworks and can be appraised, from an ethical perspective, in light of these values, interests, and functions. This work examines the key values, interests, and functions of (...)
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  2.  8
    Suicidology as a Social Practice.Scott J. Fitzpatrick, Claire Hooker & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - Social Epistemology 29 (3):303-322.
    Suicide has long been the subject of philosophical, literary, theological and cultural–historical inquiry. But despite the diversity of disciplinary and methodological approaches that have been brought to bear in the study of suicide, we argue that the formal study of suicide, that is, suicidology, is characterized by intellectual, organizational and professional values that distinguish it from other ways of thinking and knowing. Further, we suggest that considering suicidology as a “social practice” offers ways to usefully conceptualize its epistemological, philosophical and (...)
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  3.  25
    Re-Moralizing the Suicide Debate.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):223-232.
    Contemporary approaches to the study of suicide tend to examine suicide as a medical or public health problem rather than a moral problem, avoiding the kinds of judgements that have historically characterised discussions of the phenomenon. But morality entails more than judgement about action or behaviour, and our understanding of suicide can be enhanced by attending to its cultural, social, and linguistic connotations. In this work, I offer a theoretical reconstruction of suicide as a form of moral experience that delineates (...)
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  4.  1
    Stories Worth Telling: Moral Experiences of Suicidal Behavior.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (2):147-160.
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  5.  4
    Ethical and Political Implications of the Turn to Stories in Suicide Prevention.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):265-276.
    One of the distinguishing features of the ‘narrative turn’ in bioethics has been the question of authorship. For bioethicists and clinicians worried about the distorting and diminishing effects of an increasingly objective, dualistic, and value-free medicine, narrative has played a leading role in establishing the importance of patients’ stories to the therapeutic endeavor while calling attention to the inadequacies of biomedicine. Narrative is seen as a way of ceding patients the moral authority to tell their stories, while at the same (...)
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  6.  1
    Stories of Suicide and Social Justice.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):285-287.
    R. Srivatsan’s view of suicide as a historically specific event enfolded with meaning and Clare Shaw’s thoughtful elucidation of the transformative power of personal stories attest to the complexity and challenge of conducting research into the meanings and functions of narratives of suicide both methodologically and ethically. Because one of the aims of my original article was to bring narrative theories and methods to bear on issues relating to the ethical and political aspects of personal narrative within the practice of (...)
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  7. Reshaping the Ethics of Suicide Prevention: Responsibility, Inequality and Action on the Social Determinants of Suicide.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phx022.
    Value judgements in research and political decision-making that exclude evidence for the social determinants of suicide suggest that evidence is not sufficient on its own to guide policy and practice, and that there is a lack of conceptual clarity with regard to decisions relating to the prioritization of problems, the allocation of resources, the translation of research into practice, as well as questions of responsibility for suicide prevention. In this work I seek to broaden conventional ethical debate about suicide through (...)
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