13 found
Order:
  1. Stakeholder Theory and Managerial Decision-Making: Constraints and Implications of Balancing Stakeholder Interests.Scott J. Reynolds, Frank C. Schultz & David R. Hekman - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):285-301.
    Stakeholder theory is widely recognized as a management theory, yet very little research has considered its implications for individual managerial decision-making. In the two studies reported here, we used stakeholder theory to examine managerial decisions about balancing stakeholder interests. Results of Study 1 suggest that indivisible resources and unequal levels of stakeholder saliency constrain managers’ efforts to balance stakeholder interests. Resource divisibility also influenced whether managers used a within-decision or an across-decision approach to balance stakeholder interests. In Study 2 we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  2.  51
    Turning Inward or Focusing Out? Navigating Theories of Interpersonal and Ethical Cognitions to Understand Ethical Decision-Making.Lumina S. Albert, Scott J. Reynolds & Bulent Turan - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):467-484.
    The literature on ethical decision-making is rooted in a cognitive perspective that emphasizes the role of moral judgment. Recent research in interpersonal dynamics, however, has suggested that ethics revolves around an individual’s perceptions and views of others. We draw from both literatures to propose and empirically examine a contingent model. We theorize that whether the individual relies on cognitions about the ethical issue or perceptions of others depends on the level of social consensus surrounding the issue. We test our hypotheses (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  3.  30
    The Unintended Consequences of Empowering Leadership: Increased Deviance for Some Followers.Kai Chi Yam, Scott J. Reynolds, Pengcheng Zhang & Runkun Su - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (3):683-700.
    Integrating research on empowering leadership with the literature on power in social psychology, we examine how empowering leaders affect the propensity of followers to engage in deviance. Across a multi-source, multi-wave field study and a controlled laboratory experiment, we find that, compared to the followers of less-empowering leaders, the followers of more empowering leaders feel subjectively more powerful and engage in more deviant behaviors. Moreover, we find that the propensity of empowered followers to engage in more deviance depends on their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  30
    Are the “Customers” of Business Ethics Courses Satisfied? An Examination of One Source of Business Ethics Education Legitimacy.Carolyn T. Dang & Scott J. Reynolds - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (7):947-974.
    Though there are many factors that contribute to the perceived legitimacy of business ethics education, this research focuses on one factor that is given great attention both formally and informally in many business schools: student satisfaction with the course. To understand the nature of student satisfaction, the authors draw from multiple theories with central claims relating expectations with satisfaction. The authors then compare student expectations of business ethics courses with instructor objectives and discover that business ethics courses are not necessarily (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  5.  14
    A Kantian Perspective on the Characteristics of Ethics Programs.Scott J. Reynolds & Norman E. Bowie - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):275-292.
    Abstract:The literature contains many recommendations, both explicit and implicit, that suggest how an ethics program ought to be designed. While we recognize the contributions of these works, we also note that these recommendations are typically based on either social scientific theory or data and as a result they tend to discount the moral aspects of ethics programs. To contrast and complement these approaches, we refer to a theory of the right to identify the characteristics of an effective ethics program. We (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  6.  56
    The Effects of Victim Anonymity on Unethical Behavior.Kai Chi Yam & Scott J. Reynolds - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (1):13-22.
    We theorize that victim anonymity is an important factor in ethical decision making, such that actors engage in more self-interested and unethical behaviors toward anonymous victims than they do toward identifiable victims. Three experiments provided empirical support for this argument. In Study 1, participants withheld more life-saving products from anonymous than from identifiable victims. In Study 2, participants allocated a sum of payment more unfairly when interacting with an anonymous than with an identifiable partner. Finally, in Study 3, participants cheated (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  25
    A Single Framework for Strategic and Ethical Behavior in the International Context.Scott J. Reynolds - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (3):361-379.
    Abstract:Scholars have developed many theories of international strategy and many theories of international ethics. Separating strategy and ethics in this way, though, perpetuates a perception that profit and ethics are mutually exclusive. Accordingly, I offer a framework that links international strategy and international ethics. I suggest that at an abstract level the strategic concepts of integration and responsiveness and the ethical concepts of justice and caring are concerned with the same theoretical quandaries. Therefore, in any situation there are behaviors that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  23
    Comments on BEQ’s Twentieth Anniversary Forum on New Directions for Business Ethics Research.Scott J. Reynolds - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):157-187.
    ABSTRACT:In 2010,Business Ethics Quarterlypublished ten articles that considered the potential contributions to business ethics research arising from recent scholarship in a variety of philosophical and social scientific fields (strategic management, political philosophy, restorative justice, international business, legal studies, ethical theory, ethical leadership studies, organization theory, marketing, and corporate governance and finance). Here we offer short responses to those articles by members ofBusiness Ethics Quarterly’s editorial board and editorial team.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  19
    Mindful but forgetful: The negative effect of trait mindfulness on memories of immoral behavior.Scott J. Reynolds, Matt Eliseo, Trevor S. Watkins & Misha Mariam - 2023 - Business and Society Review 128 (3):389-416.
    Drawing from existing theory and empirical evidence on mindfulness, we posit that trait mindfulness is associated with less accurate memories of immoral conduct. We report three studies that provide evidence of this argument. One significant implication of this finding is that it provides a more balanced and complete view of mindfulness. Specifically, while mindfulness is widely promoted for its positive effects for employee well‐being, mindfulness may inadvertently promote a biased moral self‐perception based on inaccurate memories of one's past immoral conduct. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  12
    For the Sake of the Ingroup: The Double-Edged Effects of Collectivism on Workplace Unethical Behavior.Chao C. Chen, Oliver J. Sheldon, Mo Chen & Scott J. Reynolds - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-35.
    The existing literature provides conflicting evidence of whether a collectivistic value orientation is associated with ethical or unethical behavior. To address this confusion, we integrate collectivism theory and research with prior work on social identity, moral boundedness, group morality, and moral identity to develop a model of the double-edged effects of collectivism on employee conduct. We argue that collectivism is morally bounded depending on who the other is, and thus it inhibits employees’ motivation to engage in unethical pro-self behavior, yet (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  98
    Moral Stress: Considering the Nature and Effects of Managerial Moral Uncertainty. [REVIEW]Scott J. Reynolds, Bradley P. Owens & Alex L. Rubenstein - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):491-502.
    To better illuminate aspects of stress that are relevant to the moral domain, we present a definition and theoretical model of “moral stress.” Our definition posits that moral stress is a psychological state born of an individual’s uncertainty about his or her ability to fulfill relevant moral obligations. This definition assumes a self-and-others relational basis for moral stress. Accordingly, our model draws from a theory of the self (identity theory) and a theory of others (stakeholder theory) to suggest that this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  12.  32
    Perceptions of organizational ethicality: Do inflated perceptions of self lead to inflated perceptions of the organization? [REVIEW]Scott J. Reynolds - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (3):253 - 266.
    Scholars have suggested that the tendency for an individual to perceive him- or herself as more ethical than others might influence the individual''s perceptions of his or her organization''s ethics. The purpose of this study is to consider if and/or when such a relationship exists. A thorough consideration of the nature of perceptions of relative ethicality suggests that a positive self-bias would negatively influence perceptions of organizational ethicality. The results of an empirical study involving working managers and employees of a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13.  16
    Behavioral Business Ethics: Shaping an Emerging Field, edited by David De Cremer and Ann E. Tenbrunsel . Hardcover, 280 pp., $72. ISBN-10: 041587324X; ISBN-13: 978-0415873246. [REVIEW]Scott J. Reynolds - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (3):483-486.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark