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Scott Jenkins [20]Scott Douglas Jenkins [1]
  1.  40
    Truthfulness as Nietzsche’s Highest Virtue.Scott Jenkins - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):1-19.
  2.  72
    Time and Personal Identity in Nietzsche’s Theory of Eternal Recurrence.Scott Jenkins - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (3):208-217.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s theory of eternal recurrence is an essential part of his mature philosophy, but the theory’s metaphysical commitments and practical implications are both obscure. In this essay I consider only the metaphysical elements of the theory, with the aim of determining whether it is possible that we live our lives infinitely many times, as the theory maintains. I argue that the possibility of eternal recurrence turns on issues in personal identity and the metaphysics of time. As I proceed, I (...)
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  3.  12
    The Pessimistic Origin of Nietzsche’s Thought of Eternal Recurrence.Scott Jenkins - forthcoming - Tandf: Inquiry:1-22.
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  4. Hegel's Concept of Desire.Scott Jenkins - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 103-130.
    Hegel’s assertion that self-consciousness is desire in general stands at a critical point in the Phenomenology , but the concept of desire employed in this identification is obscure. I examine three ways in which Hegel’s concept of desire might be understood and conclude that this concept is closely related to Fichte’s notions of drive and longing. So understood, the concept plays an essential role in Hegel’s non-foundational, non-genetic account of the awareness that individual rational subjects have of themselves. This account, (...)
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  5. Nietzsche's Questions Concerning the Will to Truth.Scott Jenkins - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):265-289.
    By a will to truth Nietzsche understands an overriding commitment, unlimited in scope, to believing in accordance with evidence and argument. I show that the critique of this commitment found in Nietzsche’s later works uncovers the psychological grounds of our modern will to truth and establishes its affinity with distinctively moral commitments. I argue that Nietzsche’s critique nevertheless provides no answer to his question concerning the value of a will to truth in general. Nietzsche’s examination of the will to truth (...)
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  6.  80
    Ressentiment, Imaginary Revenge, and the Slave Revolt.Scott Jenkins - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (1):192-213.
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  7.  33
    Hegel’s Epistemology.Scott Jenkins - 2006 - The Owl of Minerva 38 (1-2):151-158.
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  8.  31
    Hegel’s Epistemology: A Philosophical Introduction to the Phenomenology of Spirit, by Kenneth R. Westphal. [REVIEW]Scott Jenkins - 2006 - The Owl of Minerva 38 (1/2):151-158.
  9. Hegel on Space: A Critique of Kant's Transcendental Philosophy.Scott Jenkins - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (4):326-355.
    This paper considers Hegel's views on space and his account of Kant's theory of space. I show that Hegel's discussions of space exhibit a deep understanding of Kant's apriority argument in the first Critique , commit him to the central premise of that argument, and separate his concerns from the familiar problem of the neglected alternative. Nevertheless, Hegel makes two objections to Kant's theory of space. First, he argues that the theory is internally inconsistent insofar as Kant's identification of space (...)
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  10.  53
    Morality, Agency, and Freedom in Nietzsche's "Genealogy of Morals".Scott Jenkins - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):61 - 80.
  11.  13
    Nietzsche's Transformation of the Problem of Pessimism in Human, All Too Human.Scott Jenkins - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):272-291.
    Book I of HH would seem to announce the end of Nietzsche's concern with the philosophical pessimism that shapes BT and figures prominently in HL. In BT he endorses the pessimistic thesis that the best thing for a human being is to die soon, while he announces in HH that the even the words "optimism" and "pessimism" are outdated since they play a role in a theological discourse that is gradually dying out. This change is connected with another, namely Nietzsche's (...)
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  12.  21
    Review of Brian Leiter, Neil Sinhababu (Eds.), Nietzsche and Morality[REVIEW]Scott Jenkins - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).
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  13. Review of Leiter & Sinhababu (2007). [REVIEW]Scott Jenkins - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1 (3).
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  14. selF-ConsCiousness, sysTem, dialeCTiC.Scott Jenkins - 2010 - In Dean Moyar (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 3.
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  15.  15
    The Flame of Eternity: An Interpretation of Nietzsche's Thought (Review).Scott Jenkins - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):140-141.
  16.  23
    The Pessimistic Origin of Nietzsche’s Thought of Eternal Recurrence.Scott Jenkins - 2020 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 63 (1):20-41.
    ABSTRACTIn this article I argue that we should understand Nietzsche’s doctrine of eternal recurrence as the ideal of life affirmation opposed to philosophical pessimism, the view that life is not worth living. I first articulate Nietzsche’s psychological account of pessimism as a vengeful focus on the past and an aversion to time understood as transience. I then consider the question of why a person with the opposite psychological orientation – a creative relation to the future and an endorsement of time (...)
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  17.  17
    Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God: Studies in Hegel and Nietzsche, by Robert R. Williams.Scott Jenkins - 2014 - Mind 123 (489):260-264.
  18.  44
    What Does Nietzsche Owe Thucydides?Scott Jenkins - 2011 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 42 (1):32-50.
    In the concluding section of Twilight of the Idols, entitled "What I Owe the Ancients," Nietzsche tells us that his debt to the Greeks has little to do with Greek philosophy. Plato is portrayed as simply a step toward Christian moralism, and Nietzsche states more generally that "the philosophers are the decadents of Greek culture" (TI "Ancients" 3).1 In contrast, he remarks that "my recreation, my preference, my cure from all Platonism has always been Thucydides" (TI "Ancients" 2). This esteem (...)
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  19.  20
    Nietzsche's Therapy: Self-Cultivation in the Middle Works (Review).Scott Jenkins - 2010 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 39 (1):93-96.
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