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Scott Y. H. Kim [16]Scott Kim [8]Scott Y. . H. Kim [1]Scott Y. . H. . Kim [1]
  1.  33
    Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions pertain (...)
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  2.  35
    Broad Consent for Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions.Christine Grady, Lisa Eckstein, Ben Berkman, Dan Brock, Robert Cook-Deegan, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Hank Greely, Mats G. Hansson, Sara Hull, Scott Kim, Bernie Lo, Rebecca Pentz, Laura Rodriguez, Carol Weil, Benjamin S. Wilfond & David Wendler - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):34-42.
    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center's Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the (...)
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  3.  18
    Advance Euthanasia Directives: A Controversial Case and its Ethical Implications.David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):84-89.
    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law (...)
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  4.  14
    Are Therapeutic Motivation and Having One's Own Doctor as Researcher Sources of Therapeutic Misconception?Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond De Vries, Sonali Parnami, Renee Wilson, H. Myra Kim, Samuel Frank, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):391-397.
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  5.  14
    Response To: ‘Dementia and Advance Directives: Some Empirical and Normative Concerns’ by Jongsma Et Al.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Gibbes Miller & Rebecca Dresser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):95-96.
    We are grateful to Jongsma et al 1 for their interest in our article analysing the case of ‘Mrs A’, a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease who received euthanasia based on her advance euthanasia directive.2 Their commentary criticises two elements of our analysis. First, the authors believe our reasons for doubting that Mrs A had the capacity to write and revise an AED rely on ‘partial’ empirical data and rest on normative errors. Second, they use two of our statements to (...)
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  6.  7
    An Approach to Evaluating Therapeutic Misconception.Scott Y. H. Kim, Lauren Schrock, Renee M. Wilson, Samuel A. Frank, Robert G. Holloway, Karl Kieburtz & Raymond G. De Vries - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (5):7.
    Subjects enrolled in studies testing high risk interventions for incurable or progressive brain diseases may be vulnerable to deficiencies in informed consent, such as the therapeutic misconception. However, the definition and measurement of the therapeutic misconception is a subject of continuing debate. Our qualitative pilot study of persons enrolled in a phase I trial of gene transfer for Parkinson disease suggests potential avenues for both measuring and preventing the therapeutic misconception. Building on earlier literature on the topic, we developed and (...)
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  7.  15
    The Moral Concerns of Biobank Donors: The Effect of Non-Welfare Interests on Willingness to Donate.Raymond G. De Vries, Tom Tomlinson, H. Myra Kim, Chris D. Krenz, Kerry A. Ryan, Nicole Lehpamer & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2016 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 12 (1):1-15.
    Donors to biobanks are typically asked to give blanket consent, allowing their donation to be used in any research authorized by the biobank. This type of consent ignores the evidence that some donors have moral, religious, or cultural concerns about the future uses of their donations – concerns we call “non-welfare interests”. The nature of non-welfare interests and their effect on willingness to donate to a biobank is not well understood. In order to better undersand the influence of non-welfare interests, (...)
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  8.  19
    Trust in Early Phase Research: Therapeutic Optimism and Protective Pessimism.Scott Y. H. Kim, Robert G. Holloway, Samuel Frank, Renee Wilson & Karl Kieburtz - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):393-401.
    Bioethicists have long been concerned that seriously ill patients entering early phase (‘phase I’) treatment trials are motivated by therapeutic benefit even though the likelihood of benefit is low. In spite of these concerns, consent forms for phase I studies involving seriously ill patients generally employ indeterminate benefit statements rather than unambiguous statements of unlikely benefit. This seeming mismatch between attitudes and actions suggests a need to better understand research ethics committee members’ attitudes toward communication of potential benefits and risks (...)
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  9.  14
    Bioethics and the Sociology of Trust: Introduction to the Theme. [REVIEW]Raymond G. De Vries & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):377-379.
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  10.  11
    Improving Medical Decisions for Incapacitated Persons: Does Focusing on “Accurate Predictions” Lead to an Inaccurate Picture?Scott Y. H. Kim - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):187-195.
    The Patient Preference Predictor (PPP) proposal places a high priority on the accuracy of predicting patients’ preferences and finds the performance of surrogates inadequate. However, the quest to develop a highly accurate, individualized statistical model has significant obstacles. First, it will be impossible to validate the PPP beyond the limit imposed by 60%–80% reliability of people’s preferences for future medical decisions—a figure no better than the known average accuracy of surrogates. Second, evidence supports the view that a sizable minority of (...)
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  11.  12
    Are Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis at Risk of a Therapeutic Misconception?Scott Y. H. Kim, Renee Wilson, Raymond De Vries, Kerry A. Ryan, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):514-518.
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  12.  8
    Understanding the ‘Therapeutic Misconception’ From the Research Participant’s Perspective.Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond De Vries, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):522-523.
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  13. Analysis of Consent Validity for Invasive, Nondiagnostic Research Procedures.Jonathan Kimmelman, Trudo Lemmens & Scott Kim - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (5):1-7.
    A growing number of clinical trials use invasive research procedures to obtain tissue for disease screening and to monitor the effects of drugs. These procedures can be ethically contentious because they often have neither therapeutic nor diagnostic value, and because research participants may not realize this, which could compromise the validity of their consent to the procedure. In the first section of this paper, we describe the burdens, risks, and benefits associated with certain common invasive, nondiagnostic research procedures. We next (...)
     
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  14.  2
    Bioethics and the Sociology of Trust: Introduction to the Theme.Raymond Vries & Scott Kim - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):377-379.
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  15.  28
    The Sham Surgery Debate and the Moral Complexity of Risk-Benefit Analysis.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):68-70.
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  16.  32
    Inalienable Rights: The Limits of Consent in Medicine and the Law.Scott Kim - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):275-278.
    The aims of this book are to “explain the concept of an inalienable right,” “show why it is morally justifiable to ascribe inalienability to some legal rights,” and “examine in more detail some selected rights”. Inalienability of rights is said to be particularly pertinent in bioethics since, for example, if the right to life is inalienable, it would seem that euthanasia and assisted suicide would be impermissible. I will limit my comments to McConnell’s discussions of the first two aims and (...)
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  17.  5
    Ethical Issues in Including Suicidal Individuals in Clinical Research.Celia B. Fisher, Jane L. Pearson, Scott Kim & Charles F. Reynolds - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  18.  27
    Personal Care in Learning Health Care Systems.Franklin G. Miller & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2015 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (4):419-435.
    The “learning health care system” is being heralded as offering great potential for improving the quality and cost-worthiness of medical care by closely integrating the care of patients with the accumulation of aggregate data that can guide evidence-based medicine. By using electronic medical records, routine patient care and administrative data will be available for systematic observational studies. With the aid of these electronic medical records, quality-improvement studies of institutional practices and pragmatic, comparative effectiveness randomized trials of individual treatments could become (...)
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  19.  2
    The Role of the Family in Resolving Bioethical Dilemmas: Clinical Insights From a Family Systems Perspective.David B. Seaburn, Susan H. McDaniel, Scott Kim & D. Bassen - 2004 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (2):123.
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  20.  8
    Risks of Clinical Research Must Be Reasonable and Necessary.Scott Y. H. Kim & D. Gibbes Miller - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (10):79-81.
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  21.  30
    Remembering Errol Harris.Scott Kim - 2009 - The Owl of Minerva 41 (1/2):9-11.
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  22.  21
    Autonomy and the Relational Self.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):183-185.
  23.  15
    Acceptable Approaches to Enrolling Adults Who Cannot Consent in More Than Minimal Risk Research.Marion Danis, David Wendler & Scott Kim - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):70-71.
  24.  6
    What Is Good Public Deliberation?Susan Dorr Goold, Michael A. Neblo, Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond de Vries, Gene Rowe & Peter Muhlberger - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (2):24-26.
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  25.  4
    Clinical Trials Without Consent?Scott Y. H. Kim - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (1):132-146.
    The routine practice of clinical research involving patient-subjects without informed consent prior to 1966 unquestionably was unethical. Does it follow that all clinical research involving competent adult patient-subjects is unethical without informed consent?In his landmark 1966 paper, Henry Beecher noted that of the 50 example studies he had originally compiled in preparation for that paper, only two even mentioned consent, and he observed further that mention of consent is “meaningless unless one knows how fully the patient was informed”. Some of (...)
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  26.  6
    Commentary : Financial Conflicts of Interest and the Identity of Academic Medicine.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2005 - In Don A. Moore (ed.), Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.
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