Results for 'Scott Lichtenstein'

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  1.  39
    Changing societal and executives' values: Their impact on corporate governance.Scott Lichtenstein & Pat Dade - 2007 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (2):179-203.
    Scandals, top management misbehaviour and company failures resulting in a loss of investment and public trust in companies is well documented. Why has this corporate governance crisis happened, will it continue and what are implications for the board? A theoretical and empirical approach is taken to understand the changing nature of values in society reflected in executives to reveal the cause of the recent corporate governance crisis and implications for the board. Data from executives was collected from 163 owner/managers, senior (...)
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  2.  42
    Engaging the Board: integrity, values and the Board agenda.Scott Lichtenstein, Les Higgins & Pat Dade - 2008 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (1):79.
    Directors rate integrity as having the greatest impact on successful Board performance. Yet, no shared meaning exists about what integrity means because it is dependent on one's personal values. This paper builds on research into integrity and top teams by investigating how integrity varies by director's personal values and implications for the Board agenda. It will explore how executives' and directors' definitions of integrity are based on their values, beliefs and underlying needs. Data from UK society was collected from 500 (...)
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  3. The construction of preference.Sarah Lichtenstein & Paul Slovic (eds.) - 2006 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    One of the main themes that has emerged from behavioral decision research during the past three decades is the view that people's preferences are often constructed in the process of elicitation. This idea is derived from studies demonstrating that normatively equivalent methods of elicitation (e.g., choice and pricing) give rise to systematically different responses. These preference reversals violate the principle of procedure invariance that is fundamental to all theories of rational choice. If different elicitation procedures produce different orderings of options, (...)
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  4. Paideia: Die Grundlagen d. europ. Bildungsdenkens im griech.-röm. Altertum.Ernst Lichtenstein - 1970 - Schroedel.
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  5.  20
    Rejoinder to Sharon Smith.Nelson Lichtenstein - 2003 - Historical Materialism 11 (4):445-449.
  6.  14
    Generative Emergence: A New Discipline of Organizational, Entrepreneurial, and Social Innovation.Benyamin B. Lichtenstein - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Generative Emergence provides insight into the non-linear dynamics that lead to organizational emergence through the use of complexity sciences. The book explores how the model of Generative Emergence could be applied to enact emergence within and across organizations.
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  7. Sefer Shire maśkil: ha-gorem, parnasah ṿe-khalkalah: leḳeṭ amarim, agadah u-musar..Hillel ben Baruch Lichtenstein - 2005 - London: Hotsaʼat Mekhon "Bet sofrim Preśburg.
     
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  8.  18
    The Psychiatric Study of Jesus, Exposition and Criticism.Heinz Lichtenstein - 1950 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 11 (1):126-128.
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  9. Revaluing Laws of Nature in Secularized Science.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2022 - In Yemima Ben-Menahem (ed.), Rethinking the Concept of Law of Nature: Natural Order in the Light of Contemporary Science. Springer. pp. 347-377.
    Discovering laws of nature was a way to worship a law-giving God, during the Scientific Revolution. So why should we consider it worthwhile now, in our own more secularized science? For historical perspective, I examine two competing early modern theological traditions that related laws of nature to different divine attributes, and their secular legacy in views ranging from Kant and Nietzsche to Humean and ‘governing’ accounts in recent analytic metaphysics. Tracing these branching offshoots of ethically charged God-concepts sheds light on (...)
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  10. Facts versus fears.Paul Slovic, B. Fischoff & Sarah Lichtenstein - 1982 - In Daniel Kahneman, Paul Slovic & Amos Tversky (eds.), Judgment Under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases. Cambridge University Press. pp. 463--489.
     
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  11. Understanding Truth.Scott Soames - 1998 - Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    In this book, Scott Soames illuminates the notion of truth and the role it plays in our ordinary thought as well as in our logical, philosophical, and scientific theories. Soames aims to integrate and deepen the most significant insights on truth from a variety of sources. He powerfully brings together the best technical work and the most important philosophical reflection on truth and shows how each can illuminate the other. Investigating such questions as whether we need a truth predicate (...)
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  12.  23
    Explicit vs. implicit emotional processing: The interaction between processing type and executive control.Noga Cohen, Natali Moyal, Limor Lichtenstein-Vidne & Avishai Henik - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (2):325-339.
  13. (Mis)Understanding scientific disagreement: Success versus pursuit-worthiness in theory choice.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:166-175.
    Scientists often diverge widely when choosing between research programs. This can seem to be rooted in disagreements about which of several theories, competing to address shared questions or phenomena, is currently the most epistemically or explanatorily valuable—i.e. most successful. But many such cases are actually more directly rooted in differing judgments of pursuit-worthiness, concerning which theory will be best down the line, or which addresses the most significant data or questions. Using case studies from 16th-century astronomy and 20th-century geology and (...)
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  14.  76
    In Gods We Trust: The Evolutionary Landscape of Religion.Scott Atran - 2002 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    This ambitious, interdisciplinary book seeks to explain the origins of religion using our knowledge of the evolution of cognition. A cognitive anthropologist and psychologist, Scott Atran argues that religion is a by-product of human evolution just as the cognitive intervention, cultural selection, and historical survival of religion is an accommodation of certain existential and moral elements that have evolved in the human condition.
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  15.  49
    Scott Adams.Scott Adams & Mary Scott - 1996 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 10 (4):26-29.
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  16.  43
    The Rational Mind.Scott Sturgeon - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Scott Sturgeon presents an original account of mental states and their dynamics. He develops a detailed story of coarse- and fine-grained mental states, a novel perspective on how they fit together, an engaging theory of the rational transitions between them, and a fresh view of how formal methods can advance our understanding in this area. In doing so, he addresses a deep four-way divide in literature on epistemic rationality. Formal epistemology is done in specialized languages--often seeming a lot more (...)
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  17. Aristotle’s Economic Thought.Scott Meikle - 1997 - Clarendon Press.
    Since the Middle Ages, Aristotle has been hailed as the father of economics. But recently classicists have maintained that he did no economics at all. This book clears up the anomaly. The author argues that Aristotle had a theory of money and commerce, but that it is ethical rather than economic. According to Aristotle ethics and economics are fundamentally opposed and can never be reconciled.
     
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  18. Inconvenient Truth and Inductive Risk in Covid-19 Science.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2022 - Philosophy of Medicine 3 (1):1-25.
    To clarify the proper role of values in science, focusing on controversial expert responses to Covid-19, this article examines the status of (in)convenient hypotheses. Polarizing cases like health experts downplaying mask efficacy to save resources for healthcare workers, or scientists dismissing “accidental lab leak” hypotheses in view of potential xenophobia, plausibly involve modifying evidential standards for (in)convenient claims. Societies could accept that scientists handle (in)convenient claims just like nonscientists, and give experts less political power. Or societies could hold scientists to (...)
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  19. Aristotle’s Economic Thought.Scott Meikle - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (195):279-281.
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  20. Artistic Objectivity: From Ruskin’s ‘Pathetic Fallacy’ to Creative Receptivity.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):505-526.
    While the idea of art as self-expression can sound old-fashioned, it remains widespread—especially if the relevant ‘selves’ can be social collectives, not just individual artists. But self-expression can collapse into individualistic or anthropocentric self-involvement. And compelling successor ideals for artists are not obvious. In this light, I develop a counter-ideal of creative receptivity to basic features of the external world, or artistic objectivity. Objective artists are not trying to express themselves or reach collective self-knowledge. However, they are also not disinterested (...)
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  21.  49
    II—Scott Sturgeon: Reflective Disjunctivism.Scott Sturgeon - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):185-216.
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  22. How Anti-Humeans Can Embrace a Thermodynamic Reduction of Time’s Causal Arrow.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - Philosophy of Science 88 (5):1161-1171.
    Some argue that time’s causal arrow is grounded in an underlying thermodynamic asymmetry. Often, this is tied to Humean skepticism that causes produce their effects, in any robust sense of ‘produce’. Conversely, those who advocate stronger notions of natural necessity often reject thermodynamic reductions of time’s causal arrow. Against these traditional pairings, I argue that ‘reduction-plus-production’ is coherent. Reductionists looking to invoke robust production can insist that there are metaphysical constraints on the signs of objects’ velocities in any state, given (...)
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  23.  9
    Valuing Environmental Resources: A Constructive Approach.Robin Gregory, Sarah Lichtenstein & Paul Slovic - 1993 - Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 7 (2):177-197.
    The use of contingent valuation methods for estimating the economic value of environmental improvements and damages has increased significantly. However, doubts exist regarding the validity of the usual willingness to pay CV methods. In this article, we examine the CV approach in light of recent findings from behavioral decision research regarding the constructive nature of human preferences. We argue that a principal source of problems with conventional CV methods is that they impose unrealistic cognitive demands upon respondents. We propose a (...)
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  24.  36
    Cognitive Foundations of Natural History: Towards an Anthropology of Science.Scott Atran - 1990 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Inspired by a debate between Noam Chomsky and Jean Piaget, this work traces the development of natural history from Aristotle to Darwin, and demonstrates how the science of plants and animals has emerged from the common conceptions of folkbiology.
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  25. Political Argument in a Polarized Age.Scott Aikin & Robert B. Talisse - 2020 - Medford, MA, USA: Polity.
  26. Matters of Mind: Consciousness, Reason and Nature.Scott Sturgeon - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    _Matters of Mind_ examines the mind-body problem. It offers a chapter by chapter analysis of debates surrounding the problem, including visual experience, consciousness and the problem of Zombies and Ghosts. It will prove invaluable for those interested in epistemology, philosophy of mind and cognitive science.
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  27.  4
    The Gold Standard and the Pyrite Principle: Toward a Supplemental Frame of Reference.Stanley L. Brodsky & Bronwen Lichtenstein - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  28.  15
    La couleur eloquente.Marcel Henaff, Bridget McDonald & Jacqueline Lichtenstein - 1992 - Substance 21 (2):140.
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  29.  5
    What The Papers Say: Plant gene replacement — a natural approach.Jorge Tovar & Conrad Lichtenstein - 1990 - Bioessays 12 (12):597-599.
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  30. Essentialism in the Thought of Karl Marx.Scott Meikle - 1985 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (1):129-130.
     
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  31.  37
    Straw Man Arguments.Scott Aikin & John Casey - 2022 - London, UK: Bloomsbury. Edited by John Casey.
    This book analyses the straw man fallacy and its deployment in philosophical reasoning. While commonly invoked in both academic dialogue and public discourse, it has not until now received the attention it deserves as a rhetorical device. Scott Aikin and John Casey propose that straw manning essentially consists in expressing distorted representations of one's critical interlocutor. To this end, the straw man comprises three dialectical forms, and not only the one that is usually suggested: the straw man, the weak (...)
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  32.  34
    An Approach to Evaluating Therapeutic Misconception.Scott Y. H. Kim, Lauren Schrock, Renee M. Wilson, Samuel A. Frank, Robert G. Holloway, Karl Kieburtz & Raymond G. De Vries - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (5):7.
    Subjects enrolled in studies testing high risk interventions for incurable or progressive brain diseases may be vulnerable to deficiencies in informed consent, such as the therapeutic misconception. However, the definition and measurement of the therapeutic misconception is a subject of continuing debate. Our qualitative pilot study of persons enrolled in a phase I trial of gene transfer for Parkinson disease suggests potential avenues for both measuring and preventing the therapeutic misconception. Building on earlier literature on the topic, we developed and (...)
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  33. Epistemology and the Regress Problem.Scott F. Aikin - 2010 - New York: Routledge.
    In the last decade, the familiar problem of the regress of reasons has returned to prominent consideration in epistemology. And with the return of the problem, evaluation of the options available for its solution is begun anew. Reason’s regress problem, roughly put, is that if one has good reasons to believe something, one must have good reason to hold those reasons are good. And for those reasons, one must have further reasons to hold they are good, and so a regress (...)
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  34. The Passions and Disinterest: From Kantian Free Play to Creative Determination by Power, via Schiller and Nietzsche.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:249-279.
    I argue that Nietzsche’s criticism of the Kantian theory of disinterested pleasure in beauty reflects his own commitment to claims that closely resemble certain Kantian aesthetic principles, specifically as reinterpreted by Schiller. I show that Schiller takes the experience of beauty to be disinterested both (1) insofar as it involves impassioned ‘play’ rather than desire-driven ‘work’, and (2) insofar as it involves rational-sensuous (‘aesthetic’) play rather than mere physical play. In figures like Nietzsche, Schiller’s generic notion of play—which is itself (...)
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  35. Sensory Force, Sublime Impact, and Beautiful Form.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):449-464.
    Can a basic sensory property like a bare colour or tone be beautiful? Some, like Kant, say no. But Heidegger suggests, plausibly, that colours ‘glow’ and tones ‘sing’ in artworks. These claims can be productively synthesized: ‘glowing’ colours are not beautiful; but they are sensory forces—not mere ‘matter’, contra Kant—with real aesthetic impact. To the extent that it inheres in sensible properties, beauty is plausibly restricted to structures of sensory force. Kant correspondingly misrepresents the relation of beautiful wholes to their (...)
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  36.  5
    Michael Polanyi: scientist and philosopher.William T. Scott - 2005 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Martin X. Moleski.
    Michael Polanyi was one of the great figures of European intellectual life in the 20th century. A highly acclaimed physical chemist in the first period of his career who became a celebrated philosopher after World War II, Polanyi taught in Germany, England, and the United States and associated with many of the leading intellects of his time. His biography has remained unwritten partly because his many and scattered interests in a wide variety of fields, including six subfields of physical chemistry, (...)
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  37.  81
    Relative importance of probabilities and payoffs in risk taking.Paul Slovic & Sarah Lichtenstein - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (3p2):1.
  38.  89
    Platonism and the Objects of Science.Scott Berman - 2020 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    What are the objects of science? Are they just the things in our scientific experiments that are located in space and time? Or does science also require that there be additional things that are not located in space and time? Using clear examples, these are just some of the questions that Scott Berman explores as he shows why alternative theories such as Nominalism, Contemporary Aristotelianism, Constructivism, and Classical Aristotelianism, fall short. He demonstrates why the objects of scientific knowledge need (...)
  39. Adorno, Marx, and abstract domination.Eli B. Lichtenstein - 2023 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 49 (8).
    This article reconstructs and defends Theodor Adorno’s social theory by motivating the central role of abstract domination within it. Whereas critics such as Axel Honneth have charged Adorno with adhering to a reductive model of personal domination, I argue that the latter rather understands domination as a structural and de-individualized feature of capitalist society. If Adorno’s social theory is to be explanatory, however, it must account for the source of the abstractions that dominate modern individuals and, in particular, that of (...)
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  40. Classical Form or Modern Scientific Rationalization? Nietzsche on the Drive to Ordered Thought as Apollonian Power and Socratic Pathology.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 52 (1):105-134.
    Nietzsche sometimes praises the drive to order—to simplify, organize, and draw clear boundaries—as expressive of a vital "classical" style, or an Apollonian artistic drive to calmly contemplate forms displaying "epic definiteness and clarity." But he also sometimes harshly criticizes order, as in the pathological dialectics or "logical schematism" that he associates paradigmatically with Socrates. I challenge a tradition that interprets Socratism as an especially one-sided expression of, or restricted form of attention to, the Apollonian: they are more radically disparate. Beyond (...)
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  41. An Introduction to Evolutionary Ethics.Scott M. James - 2010 - MAlden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Offering the first general introductory text to this subject, the timely _Introduction to_ _Evolutionary Ethics_ reflects the most up-to-date research and current issues being debated in both psychology and philosophy. The book presents students to the areas of cognitive psychology, normative ethics, and metaethics. The first general introduction to evolutionary ethics Provides a comprehensive survey of work in three distinct areas of research: cognitive psychology, normative ethics, and metaethics Presents the most up-to-date research available in both psychology and philosophy Written (...)
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  42. Beyond Rigidity: The Unfinished Semantic Agenda of Naming and Necessity.Scott Soames - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (217):637-640.
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  43.  48
    Could Abstract Objects Depend Upon God?: SCOTT A. DAVISON.Scott A. Davison - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (4):485-497.
    What sorts of things are there in the world? Clearly enough, there are concrete, material things; but are there other things too, perhaps nonconcrete or non-material things? Some people believe that there are such things, which are often called abstract ; purported examples of such objects include numbers, properties, possible but non-actual states of affairs, propositions, and sets. Following a long-standing tradition, I shall describe persons who believe that there are abstract objects as ‘platonists’. In this paper, I shall not (...)
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  44.  14
    Task relevance modulates processing of distracting emotional stimuli.Limor Lichtenstein-Vidne, Avishai Henik & Ziad Safadi - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):42-52.
  45.  14
    Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement.Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse - 2013 - Routledge.
    Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement presents an accessible and engaging introduction to the theory of argument, with special emphasis on the way argument works in public political debate. The authors develop a view according to which proper argument is necessary for one’s individual cognitive health; this insight is then expanded to the collective health of one’s society. Proper argumentation, then, is seen to play a central role in a well-functioning democracy. Written in a lively style and (...)
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  46. Ambitious two-dimensionalism.Scott Soames - 2007 - In Matthew Davidson (ed.), On Sense and Direct Reference. pp. 690--718.
     
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  47. Directionalism and Relations of Arbitrary Symmetry.Scott Dixon - forthcoming - Dialectica.
    Maureen Donnelly has recently argued that directionalism, the view that relations have a direction, applying to their relata in an order, is unable to properly treat certain symmetric relations. She alleges that it must count the application of such a relation to an appropriate number of objects in a given order as distinct from its application to those objects in any other ordering of them. I reply by showing how the directionalist can link the application conditions of any fixed arity (...)
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  48. Rights, Duties and the Body: Law and Ethics of the Maternal-Fetal Conflict.Rosamund Scott - 2002
  49. On the Ways of Writing the History of the State.Eli B. Lichtenstein - 2020 - Foucault Studies 1 (28):71-95.
    Foucault's governmentality lectures at the Collège de France analyze the history of the state through the lens of governmental reason. However, these lectures largely omit consideration of the relationship between discipline and the state, prioritizing instead raison d'État and liberalism as dominant state technologies. To remedy this omission, I turn to Foucault's early studies of discipline and argue that they provide materials for the reconstruction of a genealogy of the "disciplinary state." In reconstructing this genealogy, I demonstrate that the disciplinary (...)
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  50. Confidence and Coarse-Grained Attitudes.Scott Sturgeon - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Epistemology 3.
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