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Scott M. Williams
University of North Carolina, Asheville
  1.  4
    In Defense of a Latin Social Trinity: A Response to William Hasker.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):96-117.
    In “Unity of Action in a Latin Social Model of the Trinity,” I objected to William Hasker’s Social Model of the Trinity on the grounds that it does not secure the necessary agreement between the divine persons. Further, I developed a Latin Social model of the Trinity. Hasker has responded by defending his Social Model and by raising seven objections against my Latin Social Model. Here I raise a new objection against Hasker on the grounds that it is inconsistent with (...)
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  2. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word.Scott M. Williams - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the theological (...)
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  3. Henry of Ghent on Real Relations and the Trinity: The Case for Numerical Sameness Without Identity.Scott M. Williams - 2012 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 79 (1):109-148.
    I argue that there is a hitherto unrecognized connection between Henry of Ghent’s general theory of real relations and his Trinitarian theology, namely the notion of numerical sameness without identity. A real relation (relatio) is numerically the same thing (res) as its absolute (non-relative) foundation, without being identical to its foundation. This not only holds for creaturely real relations but also for the divine persons’ distinguishing real relations. A divine person who is constituted by a real relation (relatio) and the (...)
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  4.  11
    In Defense of a Latin Social Trinity: A Response to William Hasker.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (7):96-117.
    In “Unity of Action in a Latin Social Model of the Trinity,” I objected to William Hasker’s Social Model of the Trinity (among others) on the grounds that it does not secure the necessary agreement between the divine persons. Further, I developed a Latin Social model of the Trinity. Hasker has responded by defending his Social Model and by raising seven objections against my Latin Social Model. Here I raise a new objection against Hasker on the grounds that it is (...)
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  5. Indexicals and the Trinity: Two Non-Social Models.Scott M. Williams - 2013 - Journal of Analytic Theology 1:74-94.
    In recent analytic literature on the Trinity we have seen a variety of "social" models of the Trinity. By contrast there are few "non-­‐social" models. One prominent "non-­‐social" view is Brian Leftow's "Latin Trinity." I argue that the name of Leftow's model is not sufficiently descriptive in light of diverse models within Latin speaking theology. Next, I develop a new "non-­‐social" model that is inspired by Richard of St. Victor's description of a person in conjunction with my appropriating insights about (...)
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  6.  58
    Unity of Action in a Latin Social Model of the Trinity.Scott M. Williams - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):321-346.
    I develop a Latin Social model of the Trinity that is an extension of my previous article on indexicals and the Trinity. I focus on the theological desideratum of the necessity of the divine persons’ unity of action. After giving my account of this, I compare it with Swinburne’s and Hasker’s social models and Leftow’s non-social model. I argue that their accounts of the divine persons’ unity of action are theologically unsatisfactory and that this unsatisfactoriness derives from a modern conception (...)
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  7.  31
    Shadows of Complexity: What Biological Networks Reveal About Epistasis and Pleiotropy.Anna L. Tyler, Folkert W. Asselbergs, Scott M. Williams & Jason H. Moore - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (2):220-227.
  8. Horrendous-Difference Disabilities, Resurrected Saints, and the Beatific Vision: A Theodicy.Scott M. Williams - 2018 - Religions 9 (2):1-13.
    Marilyn Adams rightly pointed out that there are many kinds of evil, some of which are horrendous. I claim that one species of horrendous evil is what I call horrendous-difference disabilities. I distinguish two subspecies of horrendous-difference disabilities based in part on the temporal relation between one’s rational moral wishing for a certain human function F and its being thwarted by intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Next, I offer a theodicy for each subspecies of horrendous-difference disability. Although I appeal to some (...)
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  9.  13
    Traversing the Conceptual Divide Between Biological and Statistical Epistasis: Systems Biology and a More Modern Synthesis.Jason H. Moore & Scott M. Williams - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (6):637-646.
  10.  11
    When Personhood Goes Wrong in Ethics and Philosophical Theology: Disability, Ableism, and (Modern) Personhood.Scott M. Williams - 2019 - In Blake Hereth & Kevin Timpe (eds.), The Lost Sheep in the Philosophy of Religion: New Perspectives on Disability, Gender, Race, and Animals. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 264-290.
    This chapter is about personhood in relation to ethics and to conciliar Christian theology, and how concepts of personhood may discriminate against profoundly cognitively disabled human beings. (By ‘conciliar Christian theology’ I mean the Christian theology that is articulated in, or endorsed by, the first seven ecumenical councils.) -/- I believe we can learn several things about personhood by looking at these two topics together. By examining ancient and medieval concepts of personhood and some modern conceptions of personhood we gain (...)
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  11.  9
    Personhood, Ethics, and Disability: A Comparison of Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern Concepts of Personhood.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - In Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 80-108.
    This chapter compares three different general accounts of personhood (Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern) and argues that if personhood is the basis on which one has equal moral status in the moral community and the disability-positive position is correct, then the Byzantine and Boethian accounts are preferable over the Modern accounts that are surveyed here. It further argues that the Byzantine account is even friendlier to a disability-positive position compared to the Boethian account.
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  12.  21
    The Use of Animal Models in the Study of Complex Disease: All Else is Never Equal or Why Do so Many Human Studies Fail to Replicate Animal Findings?Scott M. Williams, Jonathan L. Haines & Jason H. Moore - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (2):170-179.
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  13.  15
    Persons in Patristic and Medieval Christian Theology.Scott M. Williams - 2019 - In Antonia LoLordo (ed.), Persons: A History. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: -/- It is likely that Boethius (480-524ce) inaugurates, in Latin Christian theology, the consideration of personhood as such. In the Treatise Against Eutyches and Nestorius Boethius gives a well-known definition of personhood according to genus and difference(s): a person is an individual substance of a rational nature. Personhood is predicated only of individual rational substances. This chapter situates Boethius in relation to significant Christian theologians before and after him, and the way in which his definition of personhood is a (...)
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  14.  5
    Disability, Ableism and Anti-Ableism in Medieval Latin Philosophy and Theology.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - In Andrew LaZella & Richard A. Lee Jr (eds.), The Edinburgh Critical History of Middle Ages and Renaissance Philosophy. Edinburgh University Press.
  15.  18
    Book Review: Intellectual Traditions at the Medieval University: The Use of Philosophical Psychology in Trinitarian Theology Among the Franciscans and Dominicans, 1250-1350, Written by Russell L. Friedman. [REVIEW]Scott M. Williams - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (1):123-125.
  16.  9
    John Duns Scotus.Scott M. Williams - 2017 - In William Abraham & Fred Aquino (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Epistemology of Theology. Oxford University Press. pp. 421-433.
  17.  9
    Book Review:Is It in Your Genes? The Influence of Genes on Common Disorders and Diseases That Affect You and Your Family. [REVIEW]Scott M. Williams - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (1):110-111.
  18.  30
    Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology.Scott M. Williams (ed.) - 2020 - Oxford: Routledge.
    This book uses the tools of analytic philosophy of disability (and Disability Studies more generally) and close readings of medieval Christian philosophical and theological texts in order to survey what these thinkers said about what today we call “disability.” The chapters also compare what these medieval authors say with modern and contemporary philosophers and theologians of disability. This dual approach enriches our understanding of the history of disability in medieval Christian philosophy and theology and opens up new avenues of research (...)
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