6 found
Order:
  1. Critiquing the Reasons for Making Artificial Moral Agents.Aimee van Wynsberghe & Scott Robbins - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (3):719-735.
    Many industry leaders and academics from the field of machine ethics would have us believe that the inevitability of robots coming to have a larger role in our lives demands that robots be endowed with moral reasoning capabilities. Robots endowed in this way may be referred to as artificial moral agents. Reasons often given for developing AMAs are: the prevention of harm, the necessity for public trust, the prevention of immoral use, such machines are better moral reasoners than humans, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  2.  94
    A Misdirected Principle with a Catch: Explicability for AI.Scott Robbins - 2019 - Minds and Machines 29 (4):495-514.
    There is widespread agreement that there should be a principle requiring that artificial intelligence be ‘explicable’. Microsoft, Google, the World Economic Forum, the draft AI ethics guidelines for the EU commission, etc. all include a principle for AI that falls under the umbrella of ‘explicability’. Roughly, the principle states that “for AI to promote and not constrain human autonomy, our ‘decision about who should decide’ must be informed by knowledge of how AI would act instead of us” :689–707, 2018). There (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  3. Critiquing the Reasons for Making Artificial Moral Agents.Aimee van Wynsberghe & Scott Robbins - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics:1-17.
    Many industry leaders and academics from the field of machine ethics would have us believe that the inevitability of robots coming to have a larger role in our lives demands that robots be endowed with moral reasoning capabilities. Robots endowed in this way may be referred to as artificial moral agents. Reasons often given for developing AMAs are: the prevention of harm, the necessity for public trust, the prevention of immoral use, such machines are better moral reasoners than humans, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  4.  85
    AI and the path to envelopment: knowledge as a first step towards the responsible regulation and use of AI-powered machines.Scott Robbins - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):391-400.
    With Artificial Intelligence entering our lives in novel ways—both known and unknown to us—there is both the enhancement of existing ethical issues associated with AI as well as the rise of new ethical issues. There is much focus on opening up the ‘black box’ of modern machine-learning algorithms to understand the reasoning behind their decisions—especially morally salient decisions. However, some applications of AI which are no doubt beneficial to society rely upon these black boxes. Rather than requiring algorithms to be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  5.  58
    Ethicist as Designer: A Pragmatic Approach to Ethics in the Lab.Aimee van Wynsberghe & Scott Robbins - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):947-961.
    Contemporary literature investigating the significant impact of technology on our lives leads many to conclude that ethics must be a part of the discussion at an earlier stage in the design process i.e., before a commercial product is developed and introduced. The problem, however, is the question regarding how ethics can be incorporated into an earlier stage of technological development and it is this question that we argue has not yet been answered adequately. There is no consensus amongst scholars as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  6.  15
    Recommender Systems: Legal and Ethical Issues.Sergio Genovesi, Katharina Kaesling & Scott Robbins (eds.) - 2023 - Springer Verlag.
    This open access contributed volume examines the ethical and legal foundations of (future) policies on recommender systems and offers a transdisciplinary approach to tackle important issues related to their development, use and integration into online eco-systems. This volume scrutinizes the values driving automated recommendations - what is important for an individual receiving the recommendation, the company on which that platform was received, and society at large might diverge. The volume addresses concerns about manipulation of individuals and risks for personal autonomy. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark