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Scott Walter [9]Scott A. Walter [6]
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Scott A. Walter
Université de Nantes
  1.  66
    Ether and Electrons in Relativity Theory.Scott A. Walter - 2018 - In Jaume Navarro (ed.), Ether and Modernity. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 67-87.
    This chapter discusses the roles of ether and electrons in relativity theory. One of the most radical moves made by Albert Einstein was to dismiss the ether from electrodynamics. His fellow physicists felt challenged by Einstein’s view, and they came up with a variety of responses, ranging from enthusiastic approval, to dismissive rejection. Among the naysayers were the electron theorists, who were unanimous in their affirmation of the ether, even if they agreed with other aspects of Einstein’s theory of relativity. (...)
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  2.  69
    Figures of Light in the Early History of Relativity (1905-1914).Scott A. Walter - 2018 - In David Rowe, Tilman Sauer & Scott A. Walter (eds.), Einstein Studies. New York, USA: Birkhäuser. pp. 3-50.
    Albert Einstein's bold assertion of the form-invariance of the equation of a spherical light wave with respect to inertial frames of reference became, in the space of six years, the preferred foundation of his theory of relativity. Early on, however, Einstein's universal light-sphere invariance was challenged on epistemological grounds by Henri Poincaré, who promoted an alternative demonstration of the foundations of relativity theory based on the notion of a light-ellipsoid. Drawing in part on archival sources, this paper shows how an (...)
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  3.  13
    Hypothesis and Convention in Poincaré's Defense of Galilei Space-Time.Scott A. Walter - 2009 - In Michael Heidelberger & Gregor Schiemann (eds.), The Significance of the Hypothetical in the Natural Sciences. De Gruyter. pp. 193-219.
    According to the conventionalist doctrine of space elaborated by the French philosopher-scientist Henri Poincaré in the 1890s, the geometry of physical space is a matter of definition, not of fact. Poincaré’s Hertz-inspired view of the role of hypothesis in science guided his interpretation of the theory of relativity (1905), which he found to be in violation of the axiom of free mobility of invariable solids. In a quixotic effort to save the Euclidean geometry that relied on this axiom, Poincaré extended (...)
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  4.  68
    Book Review: By Abraham A. Ungar. Fundamental Theories of Physics. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2001, Xlii+ 413 Pp., $138.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW]Scott Walter - 2002 - Foundations of Physics 32 (2):327-330.
  5.  49
    Book Review: Beyond Einstein's Velocity Addition Law. By Abraham A. Ungar. Fundamental Theories of Physics 117. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2001, Xlii+413 Pp., $138.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW]Scott Walter - 2002 - Foundations of Physics 32 (2):327-330.
  6.  8
    The 'Flawed Parent': A Reconsideration of Rousseau's "Emile" and Its Significance for Radical Education in the United States.Scott Walter - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (3):260-274.
    This paper assumes the significance of Rousseau's Emile for the practice of radical education in the USA in the 1960s and 1970s. It is argued that the educational philosophy espoused in Emile is far more conservative than that actually attributed to his inspiration by some radical educators.
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  7. Book Review: Beyond Einstein's Velocity Addition Law. [REVIEW]Scott Walter - 2002 - Foundations of Physics 32 (2):327-330.
     
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  8.  19
    Henri Poincaré et l’espace-temps conventionnel.Scott A. Walter - 2008 - Cahiers de Philosophie de L’Université de Caen 45:87.
    According to the conventionalist doctrine of space elaborated by the French philosopher-scientist Henri Poincaré in the 1890s, the geometry of physical space is a matter of definition, not of fact. Poincaré’s Hertz-inspired view of the role of hypothesis in science guided his interpretation of the theory of relativity (1905), which he found to be in violation of the axiom of free mobility of invariable solids. In a quixotic effort to save the Euclidean geometry that relied on this axiom, Poincaré extended (...)
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  9.  27
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Louise M. Berman, Michael Jb Jackson, Scott Walter, Lois Weiner, Edward L. Edmonds, Mark B. Ginsburg, Benjamin Hill, Donald Vandenberg & Karen L. Biraimah - 1994 - Educational Studies 25 (2):163-189.
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  10.  20
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Randy J. Dunn, Jeffrey Glanz, Harvey G. Neufeldt, Douglas Simpson, Barry Kanpol, David Leo-Nyquist, Robert J. Mulvaney, Stephen D. Short, Scott Walter, Donald Vandenberg & Richard A. Brosio - 1995 - Educational Studies 26 (1-2):60-119.
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  11.  12
    Letters to the Editor.Scott Walter - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):374-374.
    This letter corrects errors of fact contained in a review by Yves Gingras of a biopic about Henri Poincaré.
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  12.  7
    La vérité en géométrie: sur le rejet mathématique de la doctrine conventionnaliste.Scott A. Walter - 1997 - Philosophia Scientiae 2 (3):103-135.
    The reception of Poincaré’s conventionalist doctrine of space by mathematicians is studied for the period 1891–1911. The opposing view of Riemann and Helmholtz, according to which the geometry of space is an empirical question, is shown to have swayed several geometers. This preference is considered in the context of changing views of the nature of space in theoretical physics, and with respect to structural and social changes within mathematics. Included in the latter evolution is the emergence of non-Euclidean geometry as (...)
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  13.  6
    Poincaré on Clocks in Motion.Scott Walter - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 47:131-141.
    Recently-discovered manuscripts throw new light on Poincaré’s discovery of the Lorentz group, and his ether-based interpretation of the Lorentz transformation. At first, Poincaré postulated longitudinal contraction of bodies in motion with respect to the ether, and ignored time deformation. In April, 1909, he acknowledged temporal deformation due to translation, obtaining thereby a theory of relativity more compatible with those of Einstein and Minkowski.
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  14.  4
    Breaking in the Four-Vectors: The Four-Dimensional Movement in Gravitation.Scott A. Walter - 2007 - In Jürgen Renn & Matthias Schemmel (eds.), The Genesis of General Relativity, Volume 3. Springer. pp. 193-252.
    The law of gravitational attraction is a window on three formal approaches to laws of nature based on Lorentz-invariance: Poincaré’s four-dimensional vector space (1906), Minkowski’s matrix calculus and spacetime geometry (1908), and Sommerfeld’s 4-vector algebra (1910). In virtue of a common appeal to 4-vectors for the characterization of gravitational attraction, these three contributions track the emergence and early development of four-dimensional physics.
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  15.  13
    The 'Flawed Parent': A Reconsideration of Rousseau's "Emile" and Its Significance for Radical Education in the United States.Scott Walter - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (3):260-274.
    This paper assumes the significance of Rousseau's Emile for the practice of radical education in the USA in the 1960s and 1970s. It is argued that the educational philosophy espoused in Emile is far more conservative than that actually attributed to his inspiration by some radical educators.
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