19 found
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  1.  48
    Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions pertain (...)
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  2.  30
    Advance Euthanasia Directives: A Controversial Case and its Ethical Implications.David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):84-89.
    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law (...)
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  3.  4
    What Research Ethics (Often) Gets Wrong About Minimal Risk.Patrick Bodilly Kane, Scott Y. H. Kim & Jonathan Kimmelman - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (1):42-44.
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  4.  17
    Are Therapeutic Motivation and Having One's Own Doctor as Researcher Sources of Therapeutic Misconception?Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond De Vries, Sonali Parnami, Renee Wilson, H. Myra Kim, Samuel Frank, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):391-397.
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  5.  16
    An Approach to Evaluating Therapeutic Misconception.Scott Y. H. Kim, Lauren Schrock, Renee M. Wilson, Samuel A. Frank, Robert G. Holloway, Karl Kieburtz & Raymond G. De Vries - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (5):7.
    Subjects enrolled in studies testing high risk interventions for incurable or progressive brain diseases may be vulnerable to deficiencies in informed consent, such as the therapeutic misconception. However, the definition and measurement of the therapeutic misconception is a subject of continuing debate. Our qualitative pilot study of persons enrolled in a phase I trial of gene transfer for Parkinson disease suggests potential avenues for both measuring and preventing the therapeutic misconception. Building on earlier literature on the topic, we developed and (...)
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  6.  12
    Understanding the ‘Therapeutic Misconception’ From the Research Participant’s Perspective.Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond De Vries, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):522-523.
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  7.  19
    Response To: ‘Dementia and Advance Directives: Some Empirical and Normative Concerns’ by Jongsma Et Al.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Gibbes Miller & Rebecca Dresser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):95-96.
    We are grateful to Jongsma et al 1 for their interest in our article analysing the case of ‘Mrs A’, a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease who received euthanasia based on her advance euthanasia directive.2 Their commentary criticises two elements of our analysis. First, the authors believe our reasons for doubting that Mrs A had the capacity to write and revise an AED rely on ‘partial’ empirical data and rest on normative errors. Second, they use two of our statements to (...)
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  8.  20
    The Moral Concerns of Biobank Donors: The Effect of Non-Welfare Interests on Willingness to Donate.Raymond G. De Vries, Tom Tomlinson, H. Myra Kim, Chris D. Krenz, Kerry A. Ryan, Nicole Lehpamer & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2016 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 12 (1):1-15.
    Donors to biobanks are typically asked to give blanket consent, allowing their donation to be used in any research authorized by the biobank. This type of consent ignores the evidence that some donors have moral, religious, or cultural concerns about the future uses of their donations – concerns we call “non-welfare interests”. The nature of non-welfare interests and their effect on willingness to donate to a biobank is not well understood. In order to better undersand the influence of non-welfare interests, (...)
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  9.  16
    Are Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis at Risk of a Therapeutic Misconception?Scott Y. H. Kim, Renee Wilson, Raymond De Vries, Kerry A. Ryan, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):514-518.
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  10.  15
    Bioethics and the Sociology of Trust: Introduction to the Theme. [REVIEW]Raymond G. De Vries & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):377-379.
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  11.  10
    Clinical Trials Without Consent?Scott Y. H. Kim - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (1):132-146.
    The routine practice of clinical research involving patient-subjects without informed consent prior to 1966 unquestionably was unethical. Does it follow that all clinical research involving competent adult patient-subjects is unethical without informed consent?In his landmark 1966 paper, Henry Beecher noted that of the 50 example studies he had originally compiled in preparation for that paper, only two even mentioned consent, and he observed further that mention of consent is “meaningless unless one knows how fully the patient was informed”. Some of (...)
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  12.  30
    The Sham Surgery Debate and the Moral Complexity of Risk-Benefit Analysis.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):68-70.
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  13.  6
    Understanding People’s ‘Unrealistic Optimism’ About Clinical Research Participation.Hae Lin Cho, David Gibbes Miller & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):172-177.
    BackgroundResearchers worry that patients in early-phase research experience unrealistic optimism about benefits and risks of participation. The standard measure of unrealistic optimism is the Comparative Risk/Benefit Assessment questionnaire, which asks people to estimate their chances of an outcome relative to others in similar situations. Such a comparative framework may not be a natural way for research participants to think about their chances.ObjectiveTo examine how people interpret questions measuring unrealistic optimism and how their interpretations are associated with their responses.MethodsUsing an early-phase (...)
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  14.  5
    Parity Arguments for ‘Physician Aid-in-Dying’ for Psychiatric Disorders: Their Structure and Limits.Scott Y. H. Kim, Chris Gastmans & Marie E. Nicolini - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):3-7.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 3-7.
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  15.  28
    Personal Care in Learning Health Care Systems.Franklin G. Miller & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2015 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (4):419-435.
    The “learning health care system” is being heralded as offering great potential for improving the quality and cost-worthiness of medical care by closely integrating the care of patients with the accumulation of aggregate data that can guide evidence-based medicine. By using electronic medical records, routine patient care and administrative data will be available for systematic observational studies. With the aid of these electronic medical records, quality-improvement studies of institutional practices and pragmatic, comparative effectiveness randomized trials of individual treatments could become (...)
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  16.  11
    Risks of Clinical Research Must Be Reasonable and Necessary.Scott Y. H. Kim & D. Gibbes Miller - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (10):79-81.
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  17.  23
    Autonomy and the Relational Self.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):183-185.
  18.  10
    What Is Good Public Deliberation?Susan Dorr Goold, Michael A. Neblo, Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond de Vries, Gene Rowe & Peter Muhlberger - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (2):24-26.
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  19.  7
    Commentary : Financial Conflicts of Interest and the Identity of Academic Medicine.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2005 - In Don A. Moore (ed.), Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.
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