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  1. Demonstrative Concepts and Experience.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (3):397-420.
    A number of authors have argued recently that the content of perceptual experience can, and even must, be characterized in conceptual terms. Their claim, more precisely, is that every perceptual experience is such that, of necessity, its content is constituted entirely by concepts possessed by the subject having the experience. This is a surprising result. For it seems reasonable to think that a subject’s experiences could be richer and more fine-grained than his conceptual repertoire; that a subject might be able, (...)
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  2. Merleau–Ponty on the Body.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2002 - Ratio 15 (4):376–391.
    The French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty claims that there are two distinct ways in which we can understand the place of an object when we are visually apprehending it. The first involves an intentional relation to the object that is essentially cognitive or can serve as the input to cognitive processes; the second irreducibly involves a bodily set or preparation to deal with the object. Because of its essential bodily component, Merleau-Ponty calls this second kind of understanding ‘motor intentional’. In this (...)
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  3. Content and Constancy: Phenomenology, Psychology, and the Content of Perception. [REVIEW]Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):682–690.
  4.  8
    Demonstrative Concepts and Experience.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (3):397-420.
    A number of authors have argued recently that the content of perceptual experience can, and even must, be characterized in conceptual terms. Their claim, more precisely, is that every perceptual experience is such that, of necessity, its content is constituted entirely by concepts possessed by the subject having the experience. This is a surprising result. For it seems reasonable to think that a subject’s experiences could be richer and more fine-grained than his conceptual repertoire; that a subject might be able, (...)
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    Merleau–Ponty on the Body.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2002 - Ratio 15 (4):376-391.
    The French philosopher Maurice Merleau–Ponty claims that there are two distinct ways in which we can understand the place of an object when we are visually apprehending it. The first involves an intentional relation to the object that is essentially cognitive or can serve as the input to cognitive processes; the second irreducibly involves a bodily set or preparation to deal with the object. Because of its essential bodily component, Merleau–Ponty calls this second kind of understanding ‘motor intentional’. In this (...)
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  6. Closing the Gap: Phenomenology and Logical Analysis.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2005 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (2):4-24.
    phenomenology and logical analysis. John Searle and Bert Dreyfus are for me two of the paradigm figures of contemporary philosophy, so I am extremely proud to have been offered the opportunity to engage with their work. The editors of The Harvard Review of Philosophy, it seems to me, have shown a keen sense of what is deep and important in our discipline by publishing extended interviews with these two influential thinkers. At the same time, writing this article meant entering into (...)
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  7. Reference and Attention: A Difficult Connection. [REVIEW]Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):277-86.
    I am very much in sympathy with the overall approach of John Campbell’s paper, “Reference as Attention”. My sympathy extends to a variety of its features. I think he is right to suppose, for instance, that neuropsychological cases provide important clues about how we should treat some traditional philosophical problems concerning perception and reference. I also think he is right to suppose that there are subtle but important relations between the phenomena of perception, action, consciousness, attention, and reference. I even (...)
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    Content and Constancy: Phenomenology, Psychology, and the Content of Perception.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):682-690.
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  9. Temporal Awareness.Sean Dorrance Kelly - 2005 - In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  10. Saving the Sacred From the Axial Revolution.Sean Dorrance Kelly & Hubert Dreyfus - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (2):195-203.
    Prominent defenders of the Enlightenment, like Jürgen Habermas, are beginning to recognize that the characterization of human beings in entirely rational and secular terms leaves out something important. Religion, they admit, plays an important role in human existence. But the return to a traditional monotheistic religion seems sociologically difficult after the death of God. We argue that Homeric polytheism retains a phenomenologically rich account of the sacred, and a similarly rich understanding of human existence in its midst. By opening ourselves (...)
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  11. Perceptual Normativity and Human Freedom.Sean Dorrance Kelly - manuscript