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  1.  16
    Euripides' Hippolytus.Sean Gurd - 2012 - Continent 2 (3):202-207.
    The following is excerpted from Sean Gurd’s translation of Euripides’ Hippolytus published with Uitgeverij this year. Though he was judged “most tragic” in the generation after his death, though more copies and fragments of his plays have survived than of any other tragedian, and though his Orestes became the most widely performed tragedy in Greco-Roman Antiquity, during his lifetime his success was only moderate, and to him his career may have felt more like a failure. He was regularly selected to (...)
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  2.  14
    Greek Thought and Continental Philsophy Benjamin Place, Commonality and Judgment. Continental Philosophy and the Ancient Greeks. Pp. Vi + 186. London and New York: Continuum, 2010. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-1-4411-7680-6. [REVIEW]Sean Gurd - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (1):29-30.
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    1. Cover Cover (P. C1).Erik Gunderson, Sean Gurd & David Kawalko Roselli - 2007 - Classical Antiquity 26 (1):49-80.
    In this essay I discuss Cicero's practice of submitting his texts to others for comment, arguing that the mutual reading and correction of friends' works played an important social function. By discussing what would make a text better, Cicero and his collaborators worked to forge and maintain social ties. In addition, I pursue an important corollary: for a text to provoke this activity, it must present itself as unfinished or in progress. Cicero was aware of this corollary, and in the (...)
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    Cicero and Editorial Revision.Sean Gurd - 2007 - Classical Antiquity 26 (1):49-80.
    In this essay I discuss Cicero's practice of submitting his texts to others for comment, arguing that the mutual reading and correction of friends' works played an important social function. By discussing what would make a text better, Cicero and his collaborators worked to forge and maintain social ties. In addition, I pursue an important corollary: for a text to provoke this activity, it must present itself as unfinished or in progress. Cicero was aware of this corollary, and in the (...)
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