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Sean J. McGrath [12]Sean Joseph Mcgrath [1]
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Sean McGrath
Memorial University of Newfoundland
  1.  29
    Is the Late Schelling Still Doing Nature-Philosophy?Sean J. McGrath - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (4):121-141.
    I argue against current deflationary trends in Schelling scholarship that positive philosophy is not negative philosophy by other means but exceeds it in content and form. While nature-philosophy gives to positive philosophy the means to think the positive, the latter is not “natural” but revealed. I situate the turn to the positive in Schelling’s 1809 Freedom essay, which introduces the possibility of a real distinction between nature and God for the first time in Schelling’s thought, a possibility which becomes actual (...)
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  2.  78
    Heidegger and Duns Scotus on Truth and Language.Sean J. McGrath - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (2):339 - 358.
    In his 1916 _Habilitationsschrift Heidegger enriched Husserl's notion of categorial intuition with Scotus's theory of intellection. The individual is entirely intelligible, even if its intelligibility is never fully defined. The historically singularized thing (essence modified by _haecceitas) speaks a primal word to us, and this original verbum makes possible the inner word of understanding, the _verbum interius. Heidegger argues that if the thing is actually intelligible in its singularity, history cannot be disregarded as ineffable: it becomes a domain of fore-theoretical (...)
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  3.  50
    Alternative Confessions, Conflicting Faiths: A Review of the Influence of Augustine on Heidegger. [REVIEW]Sean J. McGrath - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):317-335.
    The extent of the influence of Augustine on Heidegger, long only indicated in a few notes in Being and Time, has come into focus with the publicationof Heidegger’s earliest lectures. Far from one among many sources upon which Heidegger draws, we now know that Augustine’s Confessions is a central source of concepts for the early Heidegger. While this is further evidence of the ongoing relevance of Augustine to contemporary philosophy, it does not necessarily makeHeidegger an Augustinian thinker. The question of (...)
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  4.  26
    Editorial: Introducing Analecta Hermeneutica.Sean J. McGrath - 2009 - Analecta Hermeneutica 1:1-2.
  5.  20
    In Defense of the Human Difference in Advance.Sean J. McGrath - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
  6.  22
    In Defense of the Human Difference.Sean J. McGrath - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):101-115.
    Against the prevalent trend in eco-criticism which is to deny the human difference, I summon a set of untimely tropes from metaphysics in the interest of advancing an ecological humanism: the difference in kind between human consciousness and animal sensibility; the uniquely human capacity for moral discernment; and the human being’s peculiar freedom from the material conditions of existence. While I agree with eco-critics who argue that anthropocenic nature is not only finite, but sick: sickened by our abuse and neglect, (...)
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  7.  25
    Review of Bruce Matthews, Schelling's Organic Form of Philosophy: Life as the Schema of Freedom (Albany, NY: SUNY, 2011). 282 Pgs. [REVIEW]Sean J. McGrath - 2011 - Analecta Hermeneutica 3.
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  8.  51
    Schelling and the History of the Dissociative Self.Sean J. McGrath - 2015 - Symposium 19 (1):52-66.
    This paper explores the possible therapeutical applications of Schellingian psychological principles. A Schellingian analysis would enable us to retrieve the largely forgotten heritage of Romantic psychiatry, in particular the dissociationist model of the psyche, which was strategically rejected by Freud and somewhat clumsily revised by Jung, but which has its own intelligibility and applicability. Schellingian analysis would be dissociationist rather than repressivist, and would depart from Freud and Jung in being both a metaphysical and a moral therapy. But the open-ended (...)
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  9.  63
    The Facticity of Being God-Forsaken: The Young Heidegger and Luther’s Theology of the Cross.Sean J. McGrath - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):273-290.
    The early Freiburg lectures have shown us the degree to which Heidegger is influenced by Luther. In Being and Time, Heidegger designs a philosophy that can co-exist with a radical Lutheran theology of revelation. Heidegger’s hermeneutics of facticity constitutes a polemic with the Scholastic idea of a natural desire for God and an accommodation of a theology of revelation. However, Heidegger’s implicit assent to the Lutheran concept of God-forsakenness is philosophically problematic. To be God-forsaken is not to be ignorant of (...)
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  10.  5
    The Leibnizian Breakthrough: On Rosemary Sponner Sand’s The Unconscious Without Freud, Plymouth, UK: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014, 188 Pp., $100. ISBN: 978-1442231733. [REVIEW]Sean J. McGrath - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (2):195-202.
    Volume 6, Issue 2, November 2019, Page 195-202.
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  11.  38
    The Psychology of Productive Dissociation, or What Would Schellingian Psychotherapy Look Like?Sean J. Mcgrath - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (1):35-48.
    Schelling has been exploited for a variety of psychoanalytical projects, from Marquard’s revision of Freud, to various readings of Jung, to Žižek’s interpretation of Lacan. What we have not seen is an elaboration of the psycho-therapeutical implications of Schelling’s metaphysics on its own terms. What we find when we read Schelling as metapsychologist is a nonpathologizing theory of dissociation. Like anything that lives, the psyche dissociates for the sake of growth. The law of productive dissociation is the source of psyche’s (...)
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  12.  50
    Introduction: Schelling After Theory.Tilottama Rajan & Sean J. McGrath - 2015 - Symposium 19 (1):1-12.
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