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  1.  42
    Can Physicians' Judgments of Futility Be Accepted by Patients?: A Comparative Survey of Japanese Physicians and Laypeople.Yasuhiro Kadooka, Atsushi Asai & Seiji Bito - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):7.
    Back groundEmpirical surveys about medical futility are scarce relative to its theoretical assumptions. We aimed to evaluate the difference of attitudes between laypeople and physicians towards the issue.MethodsA questionnaire survey was designed. Japanese laypeople (via Internet) and physicians with various specialties (via paper-and-pencil questionnaire) were asked about whether they would provide potentially futile treatments for end-of-life patients in vignettes, important factors for judging a certain treatment futile, and threshold of quantitative futility which reflects the numerical probability that an act will (...)
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  2.  26
    Attitudes and Behaviors of Japanese Physicians Concerning Withholding and Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment for End-of-Life Patients: Results From an Internet Survey.Seiji Bito & Atsushi Asai - 2007 - BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-9.
    Background Evidence concerning how Japanese physicians think and behave in specific clinical situations that involve withholding or withdrawal of medical interventions for end-of-life or frail elderly patients is yet insufficient. Methods To analyze decisions and actions concerning the withholding/withdrawal of life-support care by Japanese physicians, we conducted cross-sectional web-based internet survey presenting three scenarios involving an elderly comatose patient following a severe stroke. Volunteer physicians were recruited for the survey through mailing lists and medical journals. The respondents answered questions concerning (...)
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  3.  34
    Acculturation and End-of-Life Decision Making: Comparison of Japanese and Japanese-American Focus Groups.Seiji Bito, Shinji Matsumura, Marjorie Kagawa Singer, Lisa S. Meredith, Shunichi Fukuhara & Neil S. Wenger - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):251–262.
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  4.  31
    Defining Futile Life-Prolonging Treatments Through Neo-Socratic Dialogue.Kuniko Aizawa, Atsushi Asai & Seiji Bito - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):51.
    In Japan, people are negative towards life-prolonging treatments. Laws that regulate withholding or discontinuing life-prolonging treatments and advance directives do not exist. Physicians, however, view discontinuing life-prolonging treatments negatively due to fears of police investigations. Although ministerial guidelines were announced regarding the decision process for end-of-life care in 2007, a consensus could not be reached on the definition of end-of-life and conditions for withholding treatment. We established a forum for extended discussions and consensus building on this topic.
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  5. Perceptions of Interpersonal Relationships Held by Patients with Obstinate Disease.Atsushi Asai, Yugo Narita, Etsuyo Nishigaki, Seiji Bito & Taishu Masano - 2005 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 15 (1):32-34.
    The objective of this study was to reveal the problems related to interpersonal relationships which patients with obstinate diseases face, and consider the behavior, attitude and medical intervention that healthcare and healthcare-related professions should take in regards to these problems. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with patients with obstinate neurological diseases and observation of outpatient care was also conducted. Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Patient diseases included Parkinson Disease , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis , myasthenia gravis, spinocerebellar ataxia , (...)
     
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  6. Clinical Ethical Discussion 2: Should A Physician Withdraw Ventilation Support From A Patient With Respiratory Failure When The Patient Prefers Not To Undergo Tracheotomy?Seiji Bito, Kazuki Chiba & Atsushi Asai - 2003 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 13 (4):147-151.
     
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