Results for 'Self (Philosophy History'

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  1. The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science.Alan G. Soble - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is examined in (...)
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  2.  2
    Individualism and Self-Knowledge, Tyler Bürge the History of Philosophy as a Discipline, Michael Frede.Rayme E. Engel - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (12).
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  3. A Few Moments of the Debate on the Theories of" Non-Self" and the" Two Truths" in the History of Buddhist Philosophy.Giuseppe Ferraro - 2011 - Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 52 (123):7-29.
     
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  4.  72
    Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling's System of Transcendental Idealism.Jeffrey Bernstein - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either (1) an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or (2) a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel (concerning the question of teleology) and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, (...)
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  5. The Self and its Pleasures: Bataille, Lacan, and the History of the Decentered Subject.Carolyn J. Dean - 1992 - Cornell University Press.
  6.  12
    Ancient Philosophy of the Self.Pauliina Remes & Juha Sihvola (eds.) - 2008 - Springer.
    This collection studies the various ways and conceptual frameworks with which the ancients approached selfhood.
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  7. The Self in Indian Philosophy.Kāliprasāda Siṃha - 1991 - Punthi Pustak.
     
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  8. God and its Relation with the Finite Self in Tagore's Philosophy.A. K. Srivastava - 1976 - Oriental Publishers.
     
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  9. The Person Vanishes: John Dewey's Philosophy of Experience and the Self.Yoram Lubling - 2011 - Peter Lang.
     
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  10. Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue.Christopher Gill - 1996 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
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  11. Feminism and History of Philosophy.Genevieve Lloyd (ed.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This new collection of essays by leading feminist critics highlights the fresh perspectives that feminism can offer to the discussion of past philosophers. Rather than defining itself through opposition to a "male" philosophical tradition, feminist philosophy emerges not only as an exciting new contribution to the history of philosophy, but also as a source of cultural self-understanding in the present.
     
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  12.  11
    The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History[REVIEW]F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, Koch discusses (...)
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  13. From Romantic Irony to Postmodernist Metafiction: A Contribution to the History of Literary Self-Reflexivity in its Philosophical Context.Christian Quendler - 2001 - P. Lang.
     
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  14.  11
    Self‐Images and “Perspicuous Representations”: Reflection, Philosophy, and the Glass Mirror.Anna Mudde - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):539-554.
    Reflection names the central activity of Western philosophical practice; the mirror and its attendant metaphors of reflection are omnipresent in the self-image of Western philosophy and in metaphilosophical reflection on reflection. But the physical experiences of being reflected by glass mirrors have been inadequately theorized contributors to those metaphors, and this has implications not only for the self-image and the self of philosophy but also for metaphilosophical practice. This article begins to rethink the metaphor of reflection anew. (...)
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  15.  19
    Time/History, Self-Disclosure and Anticipation: Pannenberg, Heidegger and the Question of Metaphysics.Najeeb Awad - 2011 - Sophia 50 (1):113-133.
    This essay examines Wolfhart Pannenberg’s defense of metaphysics’ foundational importance for philosophy and theology. Among all the modern philosophers whose claims Pannenberg challenges, Martin Heidegger’s discourse against Western metaphysics receives the major portion of criticism. The first thing one concludes from this criticism is an affirmation of a wide intellectual gap that separates Pannenberg’s thought from Heidegger’s, as if each stands at the very opposite corner of the other’s school of thought. The questions this essay tackles are: is this seemingly (...)
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  16. Continental Philosophy Since 1750: The Rise and Fall of the Self.C. Solomon Robert - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    The flowering of creative and speculative philosophy that emerged in modern Europe--particularly in Germany--is a thrilling adventure story as well as an essential chapter in the history of philosophy. In this integrative narrative, Solomon provides an accessible introduction to the major authors and movements of modern European philosophy, including the Enlightenment and Romanticism, Rousseau, German Idealism, Kant, Fichte, Schelling and the Romantics, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Max Brentano, Meinong, Frege, Dilthey, Bergson, Nietzsche, Husserl, Freud, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, hermeneutics, Sartre, Postmodernism, (...)
     
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  17.  33
    The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire.Shadi Bartsch - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social (...), Bartsch traces this complex notion of self from Plato’s Greece to Seneca’s Rome. She starts by showing how ancient authors envisioned the mirror as both a tool for ethical self-improvement and, paradoxically, a sign of erotic self-indulgence. Her reading of the Phaedrus , for example, demonstrates that the mirroring gaze in Plato, because of its sexual possibilities, could not be adopted by Roman philosophers and their students. Bartsch goes on to examine the Roman treatment of the ethical and sexual gaze, and she traces how self-knowledge, the philosopher’s body, and the performance of virtue all played a role in shaping the Roman understanding of the nature of selfhood. Culminating in a profoundly original reading of Medea , The Mirror of the Self illustrates how Seneca, in his Stoic quest for self-knowledge, embodies the Roman view, marking a new point in human thought about self-perception. Bartsch leads readers on a journey that unveils divided selves, moral hypocrisy, and lustful Stoics—and offers fresh insights about seminal works. At once sexy and philosophical, The Mirror of the Self will be required reading for classicists, philosophers, and anthropologists alike. (shrink)
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  18.  9
    The Self and the World—The Philosophy of Subjectivity.Werner S. Nicklis - 1981 - Philosophy and History 14 (1):53-54.
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  19.  19
    The Productivity of Nature. Schelling's Natural Philosophy and the New Paradigm of Self-Organization in the Sciences.Rainer Beer - 1989 - Philosophy and History 22 (1):16-18.
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  20.  6
    The Philosophy of the Living Spirit in the Crisis of the Present Day. A Self-Portrait.Otto Böcher - 1978 - Philosophy and History 11 (2):165-167.
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  21.  10
    The Polymorphism of Human Consciousness and the Prospects for a Lonerganian History of Philosophy.Mark D. Morelli - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):379-402.
    Lonergan's account of human consciousness as polymorphic self-presence differs significantly from both the variety of contemporary reductionistic accounts and phenomenological treatments still influenced strongly by Cartesian suppositions and/or Kantian restrictions. It is argued that Lonergan's account grounds not only a critical meta-philosophy, but also provides a heuristic structure for a nuanced genetic account of philosophic differences. In this regard, Lonergan's account is claimed to be an adequate grounding for a thorough contemporary response to the Hegelian requirement that philosophers account (...)
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  22. Poetry and Philosophy From Homer to Rousseau: Romantic Souls, Realist Lives.Simon Haines - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book features readings of over twenty key texts and authors in Western poetry and philosophy, including Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare and Rousseau. Simon Haines argues that the history of both can be seen as a struggle between two different conceptions of the self: the "romantic" vs. the "realist".
     
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  23.  15
    Altared Ground: Levinas, History, and Violence.Brian Schroeder - 1996 - Routledge.
    One of the most pressing concerns for contemporary society is the issue of violence and the factors that promote it. In Altared Ground: Levinas, History and Violence , Brian Schroeder stages an engagement between Emmanuel Levinas, one of the leading figures in 20th century Continental philosophy, and Plato, Hegel, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida and others in the history of ideas. Not merely an exposition of Levinas' original and complex ethical thinking, Brian Schroeder seeks to re-read the history (...)
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  24.  74
    The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science.Sarah S. Richardson - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars' conception of the history of the LVC and its contemporary (...)
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  25. Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self.Martin Saar - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers whose (collective) (...)
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  26.  1
    The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2.: The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science.Sarah Richardson - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars’ conception of the history of the LVC and its contemporary relevance. (...)
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  27.  35
    Self-Creation, Identity and Authenticity: A Study of "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises".Daniel Moseley - 2012 - In Simon Riches (ed.), The Philosophy of David Cronenberg. University Press of Kentucky.
    This essay explores philosophical questions about practical identity that emerge in David Cronenberg's films, "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises." I distinguish the metaphysical problems of personal identity from the practical problems and contend that the latter are of central importance to the topic of authenticity. Central scenes from both films are examined with an eye to their engagement with the issues of authenticity and self-creation.
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  28.  12
    Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799 (Review).Daniel Breazeale - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):268-270.
    Daniel Breazeale - Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 268-270 Book Review Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799 Anthony J. La Vopa. Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. xiv + 449. Cloth, $54.95. Few philosophers have led more dramatic lives than J. G. Fichte, whose serendipitous (...)
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  29. Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism.Jeffrey Bernstein - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, simultaneously, a dialectical engagement with the (...) of philosophy. (shrink)
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  30. Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799. [REVIEW]Breazeale Daniel - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:268-270.
    Daniel Breazeale - Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 268-270 Book Review Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799 Anthony J. La Vopa. Fichte: The Self and the Calling of Philosophy, 1762-1799. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. xiv + 449. Cloth, $54.95. Few philosophers have led more dramatic lives than J. G. Fichte, whose serendipitous (...)
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  31. Russell on Hume's Account of the Self.Alan Schwerin - 2013 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 33 (1):31 - 47.
    The History of Western Philosophy enhanced Russell’s broad reputation among members of the public and helped secure his finances. But the academic community was less enthusiastic about the text and tended to treat it with contempt. My paper is a critical investigation of one of the central chapters of Russell’s History: namely, Russell’s rendition of David Hume’s views on the self. My argument is that Russell’s concise treat­ment of le bon David’s provocative views on the self (...)
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  32.  30
    Senecan Moods: Foucault and Nietzsche on the Art of the Self.Ure Michael - 2007 - Foucault Studies 4:19-52.
    This paper examines Foucault's history of the ancient practices of the self. It suggests that his historical reconstruction usefully distinguishes quite different models of self-cultivation in antiquity, and in doing so helps us to identify and understand the parameters and ambitions of much nineteenth-century German philosophy, especially the ethics of self-cultivation Nietzsche formulates in his middle works. However, it also shows how FoucaultÕs casual formulation of an 'aesthetic of existence' is seriously misleading as a guide to (...)
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  33.  22
    Philosophy, Early Modern Intellectual History, and the History of Philosophy.Michael Edwards - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (1-2):82-95.
    Historians of philosophy are increasingly likely to emphasize the extent to which their work offers a pay‐off for philosophers of un‐historical or anti‐historical inclinations; but this defence is less familiar, and often seems less than self‐evident, to intellectual historians. This article examines this tendency, arguing that such arguments for the instrumental value of historical scholarship in philosophy are often more problematic than they at first appear. Using the relatively familiar case study of René Descartes' reading of his scholastic and (...)
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  34.  6
    Meanings of History as Permanent Self-Tests of Groups and Societies.Nikolai S. Rozov - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 38:71-81.
    The analytical and self-critical bias of modern philosophy lets ideology expand to most significant world-view and value areas. Hence, philosophy of history escapes such problems as meaning of history, course of history, and self-identification in history. Ideology aggressively grasps these ideas and transforms them into its own primitive dogmas that usually serve as symbolical tools for political struggle or for legitimating ruling elites. This paper shows how it is possible for philosophy, in cooperation with (...)
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  35. Altared Ground: Levinas, History, Violence.Brian Schroeder - 1996 - Routledge.
    One of the most pressing concerns for contemporary society is the issue of violence and the factors that promote it. In ____Altared Ground: Levinas, History and Violence__ Brian Schroeder stages an engagement between Emmanuel Levinas, one of the leading figures in 20th century Continental philosophy, and Plato, Hegel, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida and others in the history of ideas. Not merely an exposition of Levinas' original and complex thinking, Brian Schroeder seeks to re-read the history of Western (...)
     
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  36.  70
    The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History.Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.) - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    The concept that peope have of themselves as a 'person' is one of the most intimate notions that they hold. Yet the way in which the category of the person is conceived varies over time and space. In this volume, anthropologists, philosophers, and historians examine the notion of the person in different cultures, past and present. Taking as their starting point a lecture on the person as a category of the human mind, given by Marcel Mauss in 1938, the contributors (...)
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  37.  19
    Knowledge of the Self in Berkeley's Philosophy.Sami M. Najm - 1966 - International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (2):248-269.
    Given berkeley's view of ideas and spirits and his reference to notions of spirits, Actions, Relations, And ideas, I argue that (a) the doctrine of the notion is his account of knowledge of the self, (b) to have a notion of something is to comprehend it non-Perceptually and actively, And (c) berkeley ultimately holds the self is substantial and knowable. By intuition and principled knowledge we know the self "exists". Notional knowledge is not intuition. The former and (...)
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  38.  78
    Discipline, Philosophy, and History.John Zammito - 2010 - History and Theory 49 (2):289-303.
    Gorman proposes to investigate historical practice under the rubric of a philosophy of disciplines. Such philosophy must first “recover historically” the self-constitution of the discipline in order then to appraise its procedures for warranting claims. Gorman's concept of discipline would have profited from consulting the substantial body of empirical research and theory regarding disciplinarity, and his “historical recovery” of the discipline of history leaves a lot to be desired. These insufficiencies vitiate the interesting arguments he has to offer (...)
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  39.  1
    Conceptual Analysis for Genealogical Philosophy: How to Study the History of Practices After Foucault and Wittgenstein.Colin Koopman - 2017 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 55 (S1):103-121.
    Inquiry into the history of practices in the manner of Foucault's philosophical genealogy requires that we distinguish between practical action, on the one hand, and mere behavior, on the other. The need for this distinction may help explicate an aspect of Foucault's philosophical genealogy that might otherwise appear misplaced, namely his attention to rationalities and its attendant conceptual material. This article shows how a genealogical attention to practice goes hand in hand with an attention to the role of the (...)
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  40.  4
    How Important for Philosophers is the History of Philosophy?Roy Mash - 1987 - History and Theory 26 (3):287-299.
    The current academic discipline of philosophy frequently emphasizes historical aspects of philosophy. Many writers claim that the history of philosophy is indispensable to philosophy. Of the three sorts of reasons for this indispensability - pragmatic, homely, and farfetched - only the third sort holds up. Even the homely reasons point only to the usefulness of the study of the history of philosophy to the practice of philosophy, not its indispensability. The main pragmatic reason for studying the history (...)
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  41.  14
    The "Metaphor of Life": Herder's Philosophy of History and Uneven Developments in Late Eighteenth-Century Natural Sciences.Elías Palti - 1999 - History and Theory 38 (3):322–347.
    The origins of the evolutionary concept of history have normally been associated with the development of an organicist notion of society. The meaning of this notion, in turn, has been assumed as something perfectly established and clear, almost self-evident. This assumption has prevented any close scrutiny of it. As this article tries to show, the idea of "organism" that underlies the emergence of the evolutionary concept of history, far from being "self-evident," has an intricate history (...)
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  42.  3
    Self-Mastery and Universal History.David James - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):932-952.
    Horkheimer and Adorno make claims that imply a complete rejection of the idea of a universal history developed in classical German philosophy. Using Kant’s account of universal history, I argue that some features of the idea of a universal history can nevertheless be detected in the Dialectic of Enlightenment and some of Adorno’s remarks on freedom and history. This is done in connection with the kind of rational self-mastery that they associate with the story of (...)
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  43.  15
    A Redescriptive History of Humanism and Hermeneutics in African Philosophy.Oladapo Jimoh Balogun - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):105.
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to the on-going debate about self-redescription in the history of African philosophy using the method and theory of redescription. This method and theory of redescription has become the deep concern of not only Western philosophers but of many African philosophers which is markedly present in their agitated pursuits of wisdom. This self-redescription is always resiliently presented in the works of Kwasi Wiredu, Kwame Appiah, Gyekye Kwame, Olusegun Oladipo, Wole Soyinka, (...)
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  44.  28
    Foucault's History of the Present as Self-Referential Knowledge Acquisition.Patrick Baert - 1998 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6):111-126.
    Underlying this article is the conviction that social scientists typically take on board a too restrictive concept of knowledge acquisition. The paper propounds a new concept of knowledge acquisition, one which is self-referential (i.e. which affects one's presuppositions) and which draws upon the unfamiliar to reveal and undercut the familiar. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it is to show that this concept of knowledge acqui sition is already anticipated by Foucault, that it is a major concern (...)
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  45.  2
    Self-Mastery and Universal History: Horkheimer and Adorno on the Conditions of a Society ‘in Control of Itself’.David James - 2016 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):932-952.
    Horkheimer and Adorno make claims that imply a complete rejection of the idea of a universal history developed in classical German philosophy. Using Kant’s account of universal history, I argue that some features of the idea of a universal history can nevertheless be detected in the Dialectic of Enlightenment and some of Adorno’s remarks on freedom and history. This is done in connection with the kind of rational self-mastery that they associate with the story of (...)
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  46. Self-Awareness in Islamic Philosophy: Avicenna and Beyond.Jari Kaukua - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This important book investigates the emergence and development of a distinct concept of self-awareness in post-classical, pre-modern Islamic philosophy. Jari Kaukua presents the first extended analysis of Avicenna's arguments on self-awareness - including the flying man, the argument from the unity of experience, the argument against reflection models of self-awareness and the argument from personal identity - arguing that all these arguments hinge on a clearly definable concept of self-awareness as pure first-personality. He substantiates his interpretation (...)
     
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  47. Anthropocentrism and its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy.Gary Steiner - 2010 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    _Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents_ is the first-ever comprehensive examination of views of animals in the history of Western philosophy, from Homeric Greece to the twentieth century. In recent decades, increased interest in this area has been accompanied by scholars’ willingness to conceive of animal experience in terms of human mental capacities: consciousness, self-awareness, intention, deliberation, and in some instances, at least limited moral agency. This conception has been facilitated by a shift from behavioral to cognitive ethology, and by (...)
     
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  48.  44
    Self as a Problem in African Philosophy.Chukwudum B. Okolo - 1992 - International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (4):477-485.
  49.  14
    Philosophy and the Divided Self.Daniel Breazeale - 1994 - Fichte-Studien 6:117-147.
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  50.  13
    The Constitution of the Self in Kierkegaard's Philosophy.Louis Dupré - 1963 - International Philosophical Quarterly 3 (4):506-526.
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