Results for 'Self in literature'

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  1. The Philosophical Reflection of Man in Literature Selected Papers From Several Conferences Held by the International Society for Phenomenology and Literature in Cambridge, Massachusetts.Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & International Society for Phenomenology and Literature - 1982
     
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  2. Allegory Old and New in Literature, Fine Art, Music and Theatre and its Continuity in Culture.Marlies Kronegger, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning, International Society for Phenomenology and Literature & International Phenomenology Congress - 1994
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  3. The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature, 1640–1770.Scott Paul Gordon - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Challenging recent work that contends that seventeenth-century English discourses privilege the notion of a self-enclosed, self-sufficient individual, The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature recovers a counter-tradition that imagines selves as more passively prompted than actively choosing. This tradition - which Scott Paul Gordon locates in seventeenth-century religious discourse, in early eighteenth-century moral philosophy, in mid eighteenth-century acting theory, and in the emergent novel - resists autonomy and defers agency from the individual to an (...)
     
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  4. Self-Reference in Literature and Other Media.Walter Bernhart & Werner Wolf (eds.) - 2010 - Rodopi.
     
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  5.  13
    Adapting, Defending and Transforming Ourselves: Conceptualizations of Self Practices in the Social Science Literature.N. Karakayali - 2015 - History of the Human Sciences 28 (1):98–117.
    Self practices – mental and bodily activities through which individuals try to give a shape to their existence – have been a topic of interest in the social science literature for over a century now. These studies bring into focus that such activities play important roles in our relationship to our social environment. But beyond this general insight we still do not have a framework for elucidating what kind of roles/uses have been attributed to self practices by (...)
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  6.  22
    “A Hideous Torture on Himself”: Madness and Self-Mutilation in Victorian Literature[REVIEW]Sarah Chaney - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):279-289.
    This paper suggests that late nineteenth-century definitions of self-mutilation, a new category of psychiatric symptomatology, were heavily influenced by the use of self-injury as a rhetorical device in the novel, for the literary text held a high status in Victorian psychology. In exploring Dimmesdale’s “self-mutilation” in The Scarlet Letter in conjunction with psychiatric case histories, the paper indicates a number of common techniques and themes in literary and psychiatric texts. As well as illuminating key elements of nineteenth-century (...)
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  7. Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust.Joshua Landy - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should (...)
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  8. Alternative Identities: The Self in Literature.Linda Marie Brooks - forthcoming - History, Theory.
  9.  1
    Understanding the Self in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders : A Review of Literature[REVIEW]X. Huang Ann, L. Hughes Tammy, R. Sutton Lawrence, Lawrence Marissa, Chen Xiaohan, Ji Zhe & Zeleke Waganesh - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  10. Another Self in Case" : Gender, Marriage, and the Individual in Augustan Literature.Carolyn D. Williams - 1997 - In Roy Porter (ed.), Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.
     
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  11.  14
    Melancholy, Love, and Time: Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature.Tim Whitmarsh - 2005 - American Journal of Philology 126 (2):281-294.
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  12.  18
    Ancient Depression P. Toohey: Melancholy, Love, and Time. Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature . Pp. X + 386, Ills. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2004. Cased, US$70, £44. ISBN: 0-472-11302-X. [REVIEW]Shadi Bartsch - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):498-.
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    Ineke Van't Spijker, Fictions of the Inner Life: Religious Literature and Formation of the Self in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. (Disputatio, 4.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2004. Pp. Ix, 264. €60. [REVIEW]Irven Resnick - 2006 - Speculum 81 (1):285-286.
  14. The Lost Self in Modern Literature.Charles I. Glicksberg - 1962 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 43 (4):527.
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  15. The Camouflaged Sacred in Mircea Eliade's Self-Perception, Literature, and Scholarship.Moshe Idel - 2010 - In Christian K. Wedemeyer & Wendy Doniger (eds.), Hermeneutics, Politics, and the History of Religions: The Contested Legacies of Joachim Wach and Mircea Eliade. Oxford University Press.
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  16. The Victorian Renaissance Self in The Renaissance in Victorian Literature.John R. Reed - 1988 - Clio 17 (2):187-208.
     
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  17. Fictions of the Inner Life: Religious Literature and Formation of the Self in the Eleventh and Twelfth CenturiesIneke Van't Spijker.Irven Resnick - 2006 - Speculum 81 (1):285-286.
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  18. Expressions of Self in Chinese Literature.Madeline K. Spring, Robert E. Hegel & Richard C. Hessney - 1986 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 106 (3):612.
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  19. Politics of the Self Feminism and the Postmodern in West German Literature and Film.Richard W. Mccormick - 1991
     
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  20.  54
    Sophrosyne Helen North: Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, Xxxv.) Pp. Xx+391. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1966. Cloth, 80s. Net. [REVIEW]H. C. Baldry - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (02):192-194.
  21.  7
    Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature.J. Kemp & Helen North - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):359.
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  22.  7
    Creating Roman Identity: Subjectivity and Self-Fashioning in Latin Literature The 1995 Berkeley Conference.Yasmin Syed - 1997 - Classical Antiquity 16 (1):5-7.
  23.  4
    The Journey to Wisdom: Self-Education in Patristic and Medieval Literature[REVIEW]Dominic O'meara - 1997 - Speculum 72 (4):1205-1206.
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  24. Paul A. Olson, The Journey to Wisdom: Self-Education in Patristic and Medieval Literature. Lincoln, Nebr., and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. Pp. Xxi, 297. $40. [REVIEW]Dominic J. O'Meara - 1997 - Speculum 72 (4):1205-1206.
     
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  25.  1
    The Journey to Wisdom: Self-Education in Patristic and Medieval Literature.Paul A. Olson.Dominic J. O'Meara - 1997 - Speculum 72 (4):1205-1206.
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  26. From Passion to Self-Reflexivity. A Holistic Approach to Consciousness and Literature in The Elemental Passions of the Soul. Poetics of the Elements in the Human Conditions: Part 3. [REVIEW]Aj Argyros - 1989 - Analecta Husserliana 28:617-626.
     
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  27. Sophrosyne. Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature[REVIEW]G. J. De Vries - 1968 - Mnemosyne 21 (1):96-98.
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  28. The Social Role of Literature. L. Van Hoof, P. Van Nuffelen Literature and Society in the Fourth Centuryad. Performing Paideia, Constructing the Present, Presenting the Self. Pp. X + 247, B/W & Colour Ills. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2015. Cased, €110, Us$142. Isbn: 978-90-04-27848-6. [REVIEW]David Woods - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (1):55-57.
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  29. Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue.Christopher Gill - 1996 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
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  30. On Moral Personhood: Philosophy, Literature, Criticism, and Self-Understanding.Richard Eldridge, Martha C. Nussbaum & Frank Palmer - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (2):409-431.
    Frank Palmer, Richard Eldridge, and Martha Nussbaum explore the contributions that imaginative literature can make to ethics. From three different moral philosophical perspectives, they argue that reading literature can help persons to achieve greater moral understanding. This essay examines how each author conceives of moral understanding, particularly in its emotional dimension, and how each thinks that reading literature can promote moral understanding. The essay also considers some implications of this work for religious ethics.
     
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  31. The Modern Self in Rousseau's Confessions a Reply to St. Augustine.Ann Hartle - 1983
     
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  32. From Romantic Irony to Postmodernist Metafiction: A Contribution to the History of Literary Self-Reflexivity in its Philosophical Context.Christian Quendler - 2001 - P. Lang.
     
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  33. "Know Thyself" in Greek and Latin Literature.Eliza Gregory Wilkins - 1979
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  34.  38
    Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature.Genevieve Lloyd - 1993 - Routledge.
    Being in Time is a provocative and accessible essay on the fragmentation of the self as explored in philosophy and literature. This original study is unique in its focus on the literary aspects of philosophical writing and their interactions with philosophical content. It explores the emotional aspects of the human experience of time commonly neglected in philosophical investigation by looking at how narrative creates and treats the experience of the self as fragmented and the past as "lost." (...)
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  35.  17
    The Other Self: Psychopathology and Literature[REVIEW]Javier Saavedra Macías & Rafael Velez Núñez - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):257-267.
    The figure of the “double” or the other self is an important topic in the history of literature. Many centuries before Jean Paul Richter coined the term, “doppelgänger,” at the beginning of the Romantic Movement in the year 1796, it is possible to find the figure of the double in myths and legends. The issue of the double emphaszses the contradictory character of the human being and invokes a sinister dimension of the psychological world, what has been called (...)
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  36.  11
    Speaking the Despicable: Blasphemy in Literature.Andreea Tereza Nitisor - 2007 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (16):69-79.
    This article examines the controversial issue of blasphemy in literature from the viewpoint of reception inside and outside the academia. The thesis of the article is that blasphemy in literature, though inherently related to religion and language, has a plurality of connotations and interpretations (dissidence, intertextuality, critique of colonialism, discursive strategy, alterity/Otherness, ethnicity, subversive text). Consequently, blasphemy in literature is an incentive for fruitful discussions regarding tolerance, freedom of expression, and the re-situation of the (post)modern self (...)
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  37.  47
    Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise.Marina Frasca-Spada - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Hume's discussion of the idea of space in his Treatise on Human Nature is fundamental to an understanding of his treatment of such central issues as the existence of external objects, the unity of the self, the relation between certainty and belief, and abstract ideas. Marina Frasca-Spada's rich and original study examines this difficult part of Hume's philosophical writings and connects it to eighteenth-century works in natural philosophy, mathematics and literature. Focusing on Hume's discussions of the infinite divisibility (...)
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  38.  69
    Kafka, Paranoic Doubles and the Brain: Hypnagogic Vs. Hyper-Reflexive Models of Disrupted Self in Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Anomalous Conscious States. [REVIEW]Aaron L. Mishara - 2010 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):13.
    Kafka's writings are frequently interpreted as representing the historical period of modernism in which he was writing. Little attention has been paid, however, to the possibility that his writings may reflect neural mechanisms in the processing of self during hypnagogic (i.e., between waking and sleep) states. Kafka suffered from dream-like, hypnagogic hallucinations during a sleep-deprived state while writing. This paper discusses reasons (phenomenological and neurobiological) why the self projects an imaginary double (autoscopy) in its spontaneous hallucinations and how (...)
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  39.  3
    Self in the Brain.Kai Vogeley & Shaun Gallagher - 2011 - In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    This article re-examines the role of the brain in self-recognition. It reconsiders the idea that the frontal and cortical midline structures are important for self-specific experience in light of several recent reviews of neuroscience literature. The findings suggests that the frontal cortex and the cortical midline structure are not the only areas involved in self-related tasks and that these areas may be involved not because the tasks are self-specific, but because they are tasks that involve (...)
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  40.  37
    Spatial Form in Literature: Toward a General Theory.W. J. T. Mitchell - 1980 - Critical Inquiry 6 (3):539-567.
    Although the notion of spatiality has always lurked in the background of discussions of literary form, the self-conscious use of the term as a critical concept is generally traced to Joseph Frank's seminal essay of 1945, "Spatial Form in Modern Literature."1 Frank's basic argument is that modernist literary works are "spatial" insofar as they replace history and narrative sequence with a sense of mythic simultaneity and disrupt the normal continuities of English prose with disjunctive syntactic arrangements. This argument (...)
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  41. Fictional Characters, Real Problems: The Search for Ethical Content in Literature.Garry L. Hagberg (ed.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Literature is a complex and multifaceted expression of our humanity, one dimension of which is ethical content. This striking collection of new essays pursues a fuller and richer understanding of five of the central aspects of this ethical content. These aspects are: the question of character, its formation, and its role in moral discernment; poetic vision in the context of ethical understanding; literature's distinctive role in self-identity and self-understanding; patterns of moral growth and change that emerge (...)
     
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  42. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise.Marina Frasca-Spada - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Hume's discussion of the idea of space in his Treatise on Human Nature is fundamental to an understanding of his treatment of such central issues as the existence of external objects, the unity of the self, the relation between certainty and belief, and abstract ideas. Marina Frasca-Spada's rich and original study examines this difficult part of Hume's philosophical writings and connects it to eighteenth-century works in natural philosophy, mathematics and literature. Focusing on Hume's discussions of the infinite divisibility (...)
     
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  43. Towards Healing of Tragedy a Dynamic of Transcendence in Literature.Michael Paul Gallagher - 2006 - Gregorianum 87 (2):358-367.
    Although both the ancient classical forms of tragedy and the nihilist tendencies of postmodern writing are marked by paralysis and passivity before fate, more religiously influenced periods of English literature are characterised by self-transcending and self-transforming movement beyond tragic impotence. This insight is illustrated briefly through references to Shakespeare's King Lear but it can also be found in Dante and in less explicitly Christian authors. The wisdom of humility exemplified in these literary masterpieces with a religious background (...)
     
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  44.  6
    Of Private Selves and Public Morals: Philosophy and Literature in Modernity.Tracy Llanera - 2017 - In Philippa Kelly, Emily Finlay & Tom Clark (eds.), Worldmaking: Literature, Language, Culture. Amsterdam, Philadelphia: John Benjamins. pp. 77-86.
    What is the moral, spiritual, and educative function of philosophy and literature in modern lives? Such a large question is rarely posed by philosophers or literary theorists these days, but one philosopher who has put it at the top of his agenda is Richard Rorty. His general answer is that both literature and philosophy serve distinct ends: the private end of personal fulfilment through the redescription of experiences and the possibility of self-creation, and the public end of (...)
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  45. Empirical Consciousness Explained: Self-Affection, (Self-)Consciousness and Perception in the B Deduction.Corey W. Dyck - 2006 - Kantian Review 11 (1):29-54.
    Few of Kant’s doctrines are as difficult to understand as that of self-affection. Its brief career in the published literature consists principally in its unheralded introduction in the Transcendental Aesthetic and unexpected re-appearance at a key moment in the Deduction chapter in the B edition of the first Critique. Kant’s commentators, confronted with the difficulty of this doctrine, have naturally resorted to various strategies of clarification, ranging from distinguishing between empirical and transcendental self-affection, divorcing self-affection from (...)
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  46.  54
    Self-Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Business Case: Do They Work in Achieving Workplace Equality and Safety?Susan Margaret Hart - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):585-600.
    The political shift toward an economic liberalism in many developed market economies, emphasizing the importance of the marketplace rather than government intervention in the economy and society (Dorman, Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management: Perspectives on an International Development, 2000; Tombs, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 3(1): 24-25, 2005; Walters, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 03(2):3-19, 2005), featured a prominent discourse centered on the need for business flexibility and competitiveness in a global economy (Dorman, 2000; Tombs, (...)
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  47.  26
    Self-Serving Biases and Public Justifications in Trust Games.Cristina Bicchieri & Hugo Mercier - 2013 - Synthese 190 (5):909-922.
    Often, when several norms are present and may be in conflict, individuals will display a self-serving bias, privileging the norm that best serves their interests. Xiao and Bicchieri (J Econ Psychol 31(3):456–470, 2010) tested the effects of inequality on reciprocating behavior in trust games and showed that—when inequality increases—reciprocity loses its appeal. They hypothesized that self-serving biases in choosing to privilege a particular social norm occur when the choice of that norm is publicly justifiable as reasonable, even if (...)
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  48.  20
    Patient Autonomy and Choice in Healthcare: Self-Testing Devices as a Case in Point.Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O'Mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that (...)-testing provides a specific example how increased patient autonomy and choice within healthcare might not best serve the patient population. We propose that current interpretations of autonomy in healthcare are based on negative accounts of liberty to the detriment of a more relational understanding. We also propose that Kantian philosophy is often applied to the healthcare arena in an inappropriate manner. We draw on the philosophical literature and examples from the self-testing process to support these claims. We conclude by offering an alternative account of autonomy based on the interrelated concepts of relationality, care and responsibility. (shrink)
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  49.  14
    Nanotechnology and Ethics: The Role of Regulation Versus Self-Commitment in Shaping Researchers' Behavior. [REVIEW]Matthias Fink, Rainer Harms & Isabella Hatak - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):569-581.
    The governance of nanotechnology seeks to limit its risks, without constraining opportunities. The literature on the effectiveness of approaches to governance has neglected approaches that impact directly on the behavior of a researcher. We analyze the effectiveness of legal regulations versus regulation via self-commitment. Then, we refine this model by analyzing competition and autonomy as key contingency factors. In the first step, qualitative interviews with nanotechnology researchers are conducted to reflect this model. In the second step, its empirical (...)
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  50.  40
    Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival.Raymond Martin - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a (...)
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