Results for 'Sensation'

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  1.  37
    The Critical Theory of Jürgen Habermas.Julius Sensat - 1978 - Studies in Soviet Thought 23 (1):77-79.
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  2. The exteroceptive sensations.Superficial Pain Sensation - 1969 - In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland.
     
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  3. Erratum: A Critique of the Foundations of Utility Theory.Julius Sensat & George Constantine - 1975 - Science and Society 39 (4):435-435.
     
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  4.  26
    The Critical Theory of Jurgen Habermas.Julius Sensat - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (1):121.
  5.  25
    Classical German Philosophy and Cohen's Critique of Rawls.Julius Sensat - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):314-353.
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  6.  78
    Game theory and rational decision.Julius Sensat - 1997 - Erkenntnis 47 (3):379-410.
    In its classical conception, game theory aspires to be a determinate decision theory for games, understood as elements of a structurally specified domain. Its aim is to determine for each game in the domain a complete solution to each player's decision problem, a solution valid for all real-world instantiations, regardless of context. "Permissiveness" would constrain the theory to designate as admissible for a player any conjecture consistent with the function's designation of admissible strategies for the other players. Given permissiveness and (...)
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  7.  66
    Reification as dependence on extrinsic information.Julius Sensat - 1996 - Synthese 109 (3):361 - 399.
    Marx criticized political economy for propounding an inverted, mystical view of economic reality. But he went beyond asserting the falsity and apologetic character of the doctrine to characterize it as reflecting a social practice of inversion or mystification — an inverted social world — in which individuals incorporate their own actions into a process whose dynamic lies beyond their control. Caught up in this process, individuals confront aspects of their own agency in the alien or reified form of a given, (...)
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  8. Exploitation.Julius Sensat - 1984 - Noûs 18 (1):21-38.
  9. Habermas and Marxism: An Appraisal.Julius Sensat - 1981 - Science and Society 45 (1):103-105.
     
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  10.  93
    Methodological Individualism and Marxism.Julius Sensat - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (2):189.
    Recent years have witnessed an increasing number of attempts to reconstruct Marxian theory in forms that can be assessed by reference to currently received standards in various disciplines. The work has even been said to establish a new paradigm: “analytical Marxism.” One doesn't have to endorse this claim to recognize a good deal of merit in the work. Through creative application of state-of-the-art methods to traditional Marxian issues, researchers have promoted productive cross-fertilization with non-Marxian programs and have revealed many problems (...)
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  11. Addition.J. Sensat - 1976 - Science and Society 39 (4):435-435.
     
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  12.  18
    A Critique of the Foundations of Utility Theory.Julius Sensat & George Constantine - 1975 - Science and Society 39 (2):157-179.
  13.  62
    Classical German philosophy and Cohen's critique of Rawls.Julius Sensat - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):314–353.
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  14. Marx's inverted world.Julius Sensat - 1996 - Topoi 15 (2):177-188.
  15.  20
    Rawlsian Justice and Estrangement: Insights from Hegel and Marx.Julius Sensat - unknown
    This working paper uses the works of philosophers like Hegel, Marx, and Rawls to explore political philosophy and estrangement.
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  16. Recasting Marxism: Habermas's Proposals.Julius Sensat - 1986 - In Piotr Buczkowski & Andrzej Klawiter (eds.), Theories of Ideology and Ideology of Theories. Rodopi.
  17. Sraffa and Ricardo on Value and Distribution.Julius O. Sensat - 1983 - Philosophical Forum 14 (3):334.
     
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  18.  23
    Capitalism or Worker Control? An Ethical and Economical Question. [REVIEW]Julius Sensat - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (4):622-625.
  19.  59
    Understanding Marx: A Reconstruction and Critique of Capital. [REVIEW]Julius Sensat - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (1):97-108.
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  20. Why Liberal Neutralists Should Accept Educational Neutrality.Matt Sensat Waldren - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):71-83.
    Educational neutrality states that decisions about school curricula and instruction should be made independently of particular comprehensive doctrines. Many political philosophers of education reject this view in favor of some non-neutral alternative. Contrary to what one might expect, some prominent liberal neutralists have also rejected this view in parts of their work. This paper has two purposes. The first part of the paper concerns the relationship between liberal neutrality and educational neutrality. I examine arguments by Rawls and Nagel and argue (...)
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  21. Egalitarianism Reconsidered.Daniel M. Hausman & Matt Sensat Waldren - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):567-586.
    This paper argues that egalitarian theories should be judged by the degree to which they meet four different challenges. Fundamentalist egalitarianism, which contends that certain inequalities are intrinsically bad or unjust regardless of their consequences, fails to meet these challenges. Building on discussions by T.M. Scanlon and David Miller, we argue that egalitarianism is better understood in terms of commitments to six egalitarian objectives. A consequence of our view, in contrast to Martin O'Neill's “non-intrinsic egalitarianism,“ is that egalitarianism is better (...)
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  22. Sensations: A Defense of Type Materialism.Christopher S. Hill - 1991 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about sensory states and their apparent characteristics. It confronts a whole series of metaphysical and epistemological questions and presents an argument for type materialism: the view that sensory states are identical with the neural states with which they are correlated. According to type materialism, sensations are only possessed by human beings and members of related biological species; silicon-based androids cannot have sensations. The author rebuts several other rival theories, and explores a number of important issues: the (...)
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  23. Sensations and brain processes.Jjc Smart - 1959 - Philosophical Review 68 (April):141-56.
  24.  71
    Sensation seeking: A comparative approach to a human trait.Marvin Zuckerman - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):413-434.
    A comparative method of studying the biological bases of personality compares human trait dimensions with likely animal models in terms of genetic determination and common biological correlates. The approach is applied to the trait of sensation seeking, which is defined on the human level by a questionnaire, reports of experience, and observations of behavior, and on the animal level by general activity, behavior in novel situations, and certain types of naturalistic behavior in animal colonies. Moderately high genetic determination has (...)
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  25.  56
    Unconscious sensations.Norton Nelkin - 1989 - Philosophical Psychology 2 (March):129-41.
    Having, in previous papers, distinguished at least three forms of consciousness , I now further examine their differences. This examination has some surprising results. Having argued that neither C1 nor C2 is a phenomenological state?and so different from CN?I now show that CN itself is best thought of as a subclass of a larger state . CS is the set of image?representation states. CN is that set of CS states that we are also C2 about. I argue that CN states (...)
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  26. Could Sensation be a Bodily Act?Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    Hylomorphists claim that sensation is a bodily act. In this essay, I attempt to make sense of this notion but conclude that sensation is not a bodily act, but a mental one occurring in an intentional field of awareness.
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  27. Bodily sensations as an obstacle for representationism.Ned Block - 2005 - In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press. pp. 137-142.
    Representationism 1, as I use the term, says that the phenomenal character of an experience just is its representational content, where that representational content can itself be understood and characterized without appeal to phenomenal character. Representationists seem to have a harder time handling pain than visual experience. I will argue that Michael Tye's heroic attempt at a representationist theory of pain, although ingenious and enlightening, does not adequately come to terms with the root of this difference.
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  28. Understanding sensations.Nicholas Maxwell - 1968 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):127-146.
    My aim in this paper is to defend a version of the brain process theory, or identity thesis, which differs in one important respect from the theory put forward by J.J.C. Smart. I shall argue that although the sensations which a person experiences are, as a matter of contingent fact, brain processes, nonetheless there are facts about sensations which cannot be described or understood in terms of any physical theory. These 'mental' facts cannot be described by physics for the simple (...)
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  29. Projecting sensations to external objects: Evidence from skin conductance response.V. S. Ramachandran - unknown
    Subjects perceived touch sensations as arising from a table (or a rubber hand) when both the table (or the rubber hand) and their own real hand were repeatedly tapped and stroked in synchrony with the real hand hidden from view. If the table or rubber hand was then ‘injured’, subjects displayed a strong skin conductance response (SCR) even though nothing was done to the real hand. Sensations could even be projected to anatomically impossible locations. The illusion was much less vivid, (...)
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  30. Sensation and perception (1981).Fred Dretske - 1988 - In Jonathan Dancy (ed.), Essays on Nonconceptual Content. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.
  31. Bodily Sensations.David M. Armstrong - 1962 - Routledge.
  32. Sensations, Natural Properties, and the Private Language Argument.William Child - 2017 - In Kevin M. Cahill & Thomas Raleigh (eds.), Wittgenstein and Naturalism. New York: Routledge. pp. 79-95.
    Wittgenstein’s philosophy involves a general anti-platonism about properties or standards of similarity. On his view, what it is for one thing to have the same property as another is not dictated by reality itself; it depends on our classificatory practices and the standards of similarity they embody. Wittgenstein’s anti-platonism plays an important role in the private language sections and in his discussion of the conceptual problem of other minds. In sharp contrast to Wittgenstein’s views stands the contemporary doctrine of natural (...)
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  33. Sensations as Representations in Kant.Tim Jankowiak - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):492-513.
    This paper defends an interpretation of the representational function of sensation in Kant's theory of empirical cognition. Against those who argue that sensations are ?subjective representations? and hence can only represent the sensory state of the subject, I argue that Kant appeals to different notions of subjectivity, and that the subjectivity of sensations is consistent with sensations representing external, spatial objects. Against those who claim that sensations cannot be representational at all, because sensations are not cognitively sophisticated enough to (...)
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  34. Sensation Terms.Peter Pagin - 2000 - Dialectica 54 (3):177-199.
    Are sensation ascriptions descriptive, even in the first person present tense? Do sensation terms refer to, denote, sensations, so that truth and falsity of sensation ascriptions depend on the properties of the denoted sensations? That is, do sensation terms have a denotational semantics? As I understand it, this is denied by Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein rejects the idea of a denotational semantics for public language sensation terms, such as‘pain’. He also rejects the idea that speakers can recognizesensations. (...)
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  35.  41
    Sensational Science, Archaic Hominin Genetics, and Amplified Inductive Risk.Joyce C. Havstad - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):295-320.
    More than a decade of exacting scientific research involving paleontological fragments and ancient DNA has lately produced a series of pronouncements about a purportedly novel population of archaic hominins dubbed “the Denisova.” The science involved in these matters is both technically stunning and, socially, at times a bit reckless. Here I discuss the responsibilities which scientists incur when they make inductively risky pronouncements about the different relative contributions by Denisovans to genomes of members of apparent subpopulations of current humans. This (...)
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  36.  22
    Sensations and kinaesthetic knowledge.Merrill Ring - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives, No. NO 1485:111-168.
    When Wittgenstein said psychology contains conceptual confusions and experimental results, one item he had in mind was the psycho-physiological theory of kinaesthesis, which offers an account of how we know limb movement and position. The aim of this essay is to develop and evaluate the objections to that theory which have been produced by Wittgenstein, Melden and Anscombe. That project involves specifying clearly what is involved in the theory, resolving various disagreements between the critics, showing the pattern of the objections, (...)
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  37.  13
    Sensations and Kinaesthetic Knowledge.Merrill Ring - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives 8:111-168.
    When Wittgenstein said psychology contains conceptual confusions and experimental results, one item he had in mind was the psycho-physiological theory of kinaesthesis, which offers an account of how we know limb movement and position. The aim of this essay is to develop and evaluate the objections to that theory which have been produced by Wittgenstein, Melden and Anscombe. That project involves specifying clearly what is involved in the theory, resolving various disagreements between the critics, showing the pattern of the objections, (...)
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  38.  7
    Sensations and Kinaesthetic Knowledge.Merrill Ring - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives 8:111-168.
    When Wittgenstein said psychology contains conceptual confusions and experimental results, one item he had in mind was the psycho-physiological theory of kinaesthesis, which offers an account of how we know limb movement and position. The aim of this essay is to develop and evaluate the objections to that theory which have been produced by Wittgenstein, Melden and Anscombe. That project involves specifying clearly what is involved in the theory, resolving various disagreements between the critics, showing the pattern of the objections, (...)
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  39. Are sensations still brain processes.Thomas W. Polger - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):1-21.
    Fifty years ago J. J. C. Smart published his pioneering paper, “Sensations and Brain Processes.” It is appropriate to mark the golden anniversary of Smart’s publication by considering how well his article has stood up, and how well the identity theory itself has fared. In this paper I first revisit Smart’s text, reflecting on how it has weathered the years. Then I consider the status of the identity theory in current philosophical thinking, taking into account the objections and replies that (...)
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  40. Sensational properties: Theses to accept and theses to reject.Christopher Peacocke - 2008 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 62 (1):7-24.
    The subjective properties of an experience are those which specify what having the experience is like for its subject. The sensational properties of an experience are those of its subjective properties that it does not possess in virtue of features of the way the experience represents the world as being (its representational content). Perhaps no topic in the philosophy of mind has been more vigorously debated in the past quarter-century than whether there are any sensational properties, so conceived. The existence (...)
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  41.  45
    Sensations, raw feels, and other minds.Eddy M. Zemach - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):317-40.
    IT IS POSSIBLE to discern three main types of answers commonly given to the question about the nature of sensations. The first is the classical "private access" theory, according to which I can sense my own pain, while the pains of others can never be subject to direct inspection by me. The presence of overt pain behavior may inductively confirm the hypothesis that the body thus behaving is besouled [[sic]] and subject to a sensation of pain, but I can (...)
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  42. Sensations and Brain Processes.J. J. C. Smart - 2003 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  43.  19
    Sensation magnitude judgments are based upon estimates of physical magnitudes.Richard M. Warren - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):213-223.
    After writing my response to the commentaries, I sat back and reflected on the fascination and frustration of work on this topic. There is the ancient fascination of trying to understand the nature of the sensory bridge linking us to the external world. Also, discussing the measurability of sensation brings to the surface concepts we use and take for granted when we are working in other areas of psychology; and it holds them before us for critical examination. The frustration (...)
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  44. Sensations, swatches, and speckled hens.Jeremy Fantl & Robert J. Howell - 2003 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):371-383.
    We argue that there is a interesting connection between the old problem of the Speckled Hen and an argument that can be traced from Russell to Armstrong to Putnam that we call the “gradation argument.” Both arguments have been used to show that there is no “Highest Common Factor” between appearances we judge the same – no such thing as “real” sensations. But, we argue, both only impugn the assumption of epistemic certainty regarding introspective reports.
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  45.  41
    Sensation of Movement.Thor Grünbaum & Mark Schram Christensen - 2017 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    Sensation of Movement explores the role of sensation in motor control, bodily self-recognition and sense of agency. The sensation of movement is dependent on a range of information received by the brain, from signalling in the peripheral sensory organs to the establishment of higher order goals. Through the integration of neuroscientific knowledge with psychological and philosophical perspectives, this book questions whether one type of information is more relevant for the ability to sense and control movement. Addressing conscious (...)
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  46. Sensational sentences switched.Georges Rey - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 68 (3):289 - 319.
  47.  3
    Sensation and Desire.Deborah Karen Ward Modrak - 2009 - In Georgios Anagnostopoulos (ed.), A Companion to Aristotle. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 310–321.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Sensation Desire Note Bibliography.
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  48.  51
    Sensation and Representation a Study of Intentionalist Accounts of the Bodily Sensations.David Bain - 2000 - Dissertation,
    There are good reasons for wanting to adopt an intentionalist account of experiences generally, an account according to which having an experience is a matter of representing the world as being some way or other—according to which, that is, such mental episodes have intrinsic, conceptual, representational content. Such an approach promises, for example, to provide a satisfying conception of experiences’ subjectivity, their phenomenal character, and their crucial role in constituting reasons for our judgements about the world. It promises this, moreover, (...)
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  49. Bodily Sensations.[author unknown] - 1962 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 18 (3):345-346.
  50.  27
    Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology.Harlow W. Ades - 1943 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 4 (1):104-106.
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