Results for 'Sensation'

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  1.  39
    Sensation Seeking: A Comparative Approach to a Human Trait.Marvin Zuckerman - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):413-434.
  2.  72
    Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology.V. C. A. - 1944 - Journal of Philosophy 41 (12):334-335.
  3.  18
    Sensation Seeking, Deviant Peer Affiliation, and Internet Gaming Addiction Among Chinese Adolescents: The Moderating Effect of Parental Knowledge.Yunlong Tian, Chengfu Yu, Shuang Lin, Junming Lu, Yi Liu & Wei Zhang - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  4.  69
    Sensation, Intentionality, and Animal Consciousness: Malebranche's Theory of the Mind.Nicholas Jolley - 1995 - Ratio 8 (2):128-42.
    In general, seventeenth‐century philosophers seem to have assumed that intentionality is an essential characteristic of our mental life. Malebranche is perhaps the only philosopher in the period who stands out clearly against the prevailing orthodoxy; he is committed to the thesis that there is a large class of mental items ‐ sensations ‐ which have no representational content. In this paper I argue that due attention to this fact makes it possible to mount at least a partial defence of his (...)
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  5.  20
    Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology.Harlow W. Ades - 1943 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 4 (1):104-106.
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  6.  23
    Sensation and Perception: A History of the Philosophy of Perception.L. E. Thomas & D. W. Hamlyn - 1962 - Philosophical Quarterly 12 (49):372.
  7. Perception, Sensation, and Verification.Bede Rundle - 1972 - Oxford University Press.
  8. Sensation's Ghost: The Nonsensory Fringe of Consciousness.Bruce Mangan - 2001 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 7.
    Non-sensory experiences represent almost all context information in consciousness. They condition most aspects of conscious cognition including voluntary retrieval, perception, monitoring, problem solving, emotion, evaluation, meaning recognition. Many peculiar aspects of non-sensory qualia (e.g., they resist being 'grasped' by an act of attention) are explained as adaptations shaped by the cognitive functions they serve. The most important nonsensory experience is coherence or "rightness." Rightness represents degrees of context fit among contents in consciousness, and between conscious and non-conscious processes. Rightness (not (...)
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  9. Sensation Terms.Peter Pagin - 2000 - Dialectica 54 (3):177-199.
    Are sensation ascriptions descriptive, even in the first person present tense? Do sensation terms refer to, denote, sensations, so that truth and falsity of sensation ascriptions depend on the properties of the denoted sensations? That is, do sensation terms have a denotational semantics? As I understand it, this is denied by Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein rejects the idea of a denotational semantics for public language sensation terms, such as‘pain’. He also rejects the idea that speakers can recognizesensations. (...)
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  10.  10
    Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of "Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation".James A. Secord & John M. Lynch - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):565-579.
  11.  50
    Motion, Sensation, and the Infinite: The Lasting Impression of Hobbes on Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 1997 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):339 – 351.
  12. Sensation and Consciousness in Aristotle’s Psychology.Charles H. Kahn - 1966 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 48 (1-3):43-81.
  13.  11
    Perception, Sensation and Verification.Richard W. Miller - 1974 - Philosophical Review 83 (3):403.
  14. Perception, Sensation, and Non-Conceptual Content.David W. Hamlyn - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):139-53.
    Some philosophers have argued recently that the content of perception is either entirely or mainly non- conceptual. Much of the motivation for that view derives from theories of information processing, which are a modern version of ancient considerations about the causal processes underlying perception. The paper argues to the contrary that perception is essentially concept- dependent. While perception must have a structure derived from what is purely sensory, and is thereby dependent on processes involving information in the technical sense which (...)
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  15.  19
    Sensation Seeking and Gonadal Hormones.Reid J. Daitzman, Marvin Zuckerman, Paul Sammelwitz & Venkataseshu Ganjam - 1978 - Journal of Biosocial Science 10 (4):401-408.
  16. Bodily Sensation and Tactile Perception.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):134-154.
  17. Tactile Sensation Via Spatial Perception.Ned Block - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.
  18.  13
    Sensation of Agency and Perception of Temporal Order.Jana Timm, Marc Schönwiesner, Iria SanMiguel & Erich Schröger - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 23:42-52.
  19.  59
    Sensation in Psychology and Philosophy.Charles Hartshorne - 1963 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):3-14.
  20.  23
    The Political Life of Sensation.Davide Panagia - 2009 - Duke University Press.
    Prologue : narratocracy and the contours of political life -- From nomos to nomad : Kant, Deleuze, and Rancière on sensation -- The piazza, the edicola, and the noise of the utterance -- Machiavelli's theory of sensation and Florence's vita festiva -- The viewing subject : Caravaggio, Bacon, and the ring -- "You're eating too fast!" slow food's ethos of convivium -- Epilogue : "the photographs tell it all" : on an ethics of appearance.
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  21.  11
    Plastic Bodies: Rebuilding Sensation After Phenomenology.Tom Sparrow - 2015 - Open Humanities Press.
    Sensation is a concept with a conflicted philosophical history. It has found as many allies as enemies in nearly every camp from empiricism to poststructuralism. Polyvalent, with an uncertain referent, and often overshadowed by intuition, perception, or cognition, sensation invites as much metaphysical speculation as it does dismissive criticism. -/- The promise of sensation has certainly not been lost on the phenomenologists who have sought to ‘rehabilitate’ the concept. In Plastic Bodies, Tom Sparrow argues that the phenomenologists (...)
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  22.  7
    The ‘Sensation of Doubt’ in East Asian Zen Buddhism and Some Parallels with Pāli Accounts of Meditation Practice.Robert E. Buswell - 2018 - Contemporary Buddhism 19 (1):69-82.
    The technique of ‘examining meditative topics’ is one of the emblematic practices of the ‘Zen’ traditions of East Asia. An emblematic feature of this technique is the generation of a sense of inquiry, or more literally a ‘feeling’ or ‘sensation of doubt’. This inquiry creates an intense introspective focus that, in some strands of the practice, may be accompanied by palpable physical sensations; these sensations seem to be analogous to the experience of ‘excitation’ or ‘rapture’ described in contemporary samatha/śamatha (...)
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  23.  58
    Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation.Brian Massumi - 2002 - Duke University Press.
    Although the body has been the focus of much contemporary cultural theory, the models that are typically applied neglect the most salient characteristics of embodied existence—movement, affect, and sensation—in favor of concepts derived from linguistic theory. In _Parables for the Virtual_ Brian Massumi views the body and media such as television, film, and the Internet, as cultural formations that operate on multiple registers of sensation beyond the reach of the reading techniques founded on the standard rhetorical and semiotic (...)
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  24.  6
    Sensation, Intentionality, and Animal Consciousness: Malebranche's Theory of the Mind.Nicholas Jolley - 1995 - Ratio 8 (2):128-142.
    In general, seventeenth‐century philosophers seem to have assumed that intentionality is an essential characteristic of our mental life. Malebranche is perhaps the only philosopher in the period who stands out clearly against the prevailing orthodoxy; he is committed to the thesis that there is a large class of mental items ‐ sensations ‐ which have no representational content. In this paper I argue that due attention to this fact makes it possible to mount at least a partial defence of his (...)
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  25.  92
    Burge on Perception and Sensation.Lauren Olin - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1479-1508.
    In Origins of Objectivity Burge advances a theory of perception according to which perceptions are, themselves, objective representations. The possession of veridicality conditions by perceptual states—roughly, non-propositional analogues of truth-conditions—is central to Burge’s account of how perceptual states differ, empirically and metaphysically, from sensory states. Despite an impressive examination of the relevant empirical literatures, I argue here that Burge has not succeeded in securing a distinction between perception and “mere” sensation.
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  26. Husserl on Sensation, Perception, and Interpretation.Walter Hopp - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):219-245.
    Husserl's theory of perception is remarkable in several respects. For one thing, Husserl rigorously distinguishes the parts and properties of the act of consciousness - its content -from the parts and properties of the object perceived. Second, Husserl's repeated insistence that perceptual consciousness places its subject in touch with the perceived object itself, rather than some representation that does duty for it, vindicates the commonsensical and phenomenologically grounded belief that when a thing appears to us, it is precisely that thing, (...)
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  27. Sensation, Judgment, and the Phenomenal Field.Taylor Carman - 2005 - In Taylor Carman & Mark B. N. Hansen (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty. Cambridge University Press. pp. 50--73.
  28. The Intentionality of Sensation: A Grammatical Feature.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1965 - In Ronald J. Butler (ed.), Analytic Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 158-80.
  29.  30
    Attenuated Self-Tickle Sensation Even Under Trajectory Perturbation.George Van Doorn, Bryan Paton, Jacqui Howell & Jakob Hohwy - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:147-153.
  30.  22
    The Intentionality of Sensation and the Problem of Classification of Philosophical Sciences in Brentano’s Empirical Psychology.Ion Tănăsescu - 2017 - Axiomathes 27 (3):243-263.
    In the well-known intentionality quote of his Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint, Brentano characterises the mental phenomena through the following features: the intentional inexistence of an object, the relation to a content, and the direction toward an object. The text argues that this characterisation is not general because the direction toward an object does not apply to the mental phenomena of sensation. The second part of the paper analyses the consequences that ensue from here for the Brentanian classification of (...)
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  31.  13
    Sensation: Intelligibility in Sensibility.Alphonso Lingis - 1998 - Human Studies 21 (1):113-119.
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  32. Wittgenstein’s Later Philosophy of Mind: Sensation, Privacy, and Intention.Crispin Wright - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (11):622-634.
  33. Deleuze’s Theory of Sensation: Overcoming the Kantian Duality.Daniel W. Smith - 1996 - In Paul Patton (ed.), Deleuze: A Critical Reader. New York: Blackwell. pp. 29-56.
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  34.  33
    Sensation Seeking and Online Gaming Addiction in Adolescents: A Moderated Mediation Model of Positive Affective Associations and Impulsivity.Jianping Hu, Shuangju Zhen, Chengfu Yu, Qiuyan Zhang & Wei Zhang - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  35. On Small Differences in Sensation.C. S. Peirce & Joseph Jastrow - 1884 - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences 3:75-83.
  36.  6
    Sensation Intelligibility in Sensibility.Raj Thiruvengadam - 1996
  37.  94
    Sensation and the Content of Experience: A Distinction.Christopher Peacocke - 1997 - In Ned Block, Owen Flanagan & Güven Güzeldere (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. MIT Press. pp. 341.
  38.  24
    Sensation and Representation a Study of Intentionalist Accounts of the Bodily Sensations.David Bain - 2000 - Dissertation,
    There are good reasons for wanting to adopt an intentionalist account of experiences generally, an account according to which having an experience is a matter of representing the world as being some way or other—according to which, that is, such mental episodes have intrinsic, conceptual, representational content. Such an approach promises, for example, to provide a satisfying conception of experiences’ subjectivity, their phenomenal character, and their crucial role in constituting reasons for our judgements about the world. It promises this, moreover, (...)
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  39. Sensation and Scepticism in Plotinus.Sara Magrin - 2010 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume 39. Oxford University Press. pp. 249-297.
     
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  40.  18
    Sensation Seeking and Augmenting–Reducing: Does a Nerve Have Nerve?Richard J. Haier - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):441-442.
  41.  33
    The Measurement of Sensation.Margaret Atherton - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (14):422-427.
  42. That Which Makes the Sensation of Blue a Mental Fact: Moore on Phenomenal Relationism.Benj Hellie - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):334-66.
    I interpret the anti-idealist manoeuverings of the second half of Moore's 'The refutation of idealism', material as widely cited for its discussion of 'transparency' and 'diaphanousness' as it is deeply obscure. The centerpiece of these manoeuverings is a phenomenological argument for a relational view of perceptual phenomenal character, on which, roughly, 'that which makes the sensation of blue a mental fact' is a non-intentional relation of conscious awareness, a view close to the opposite of the most characteristic contemporary view (...)
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  43. Consciousness as Inner Sensation: Crusius and Kant.Jonas Jervell Indregard - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    What is it that makes a mental state conscious? Recent commentators have proposed that for Kant, consciousness results from differentiation: A mental state is conscious insofar as it is distinguished, by means of our conceptual capacities, from other states and/or things. I argue instead that Kant’s conception of state consciousness is sensory: A mental state is conscious insofar as it is accompanied by an inner sensation. Interpreting state consciousness as inner sensation reveals an underappreciated influence of Crusius on (...)
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  44. Apperception, Sensation, and Dissociability.David M. Rosenthal - 1997 - Mind and Language 12 (2):206-223.
    Recent writing on consciousness has increasingly stressed ways in which the terms.
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  45. Afterimages and Sensation.Ian Phillips - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (2):417-453.
  46. Descartes on Sensation: A Defense of the Semantic-Causation Model.Andrew Chignell - 2009 - Philosophers' Imprint 9:1-22.
    Descartes's lack of clarity about the causal connections between brain states and mental states has led many commentators to conclude that he has no coherent account of body-mind relations in sensation, or that he was simply confused about the issue. In this paper I develop what I take to be a coherent account that was available to Descartes, and argue that there are both textual and systematic reasons to think that it was his considered view. The account has brain (...)
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  47.  32
    Matter, Sensation, and Understanding.Moreland Perkins - 1971 - American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (1):1-12.
  48.  96
    Sensation and the Physical World.William C. Kneale - 1951 - Philosophical Quarterly 1 (1):109-126.
  49.  18
    Sensation and Thought.R. G. Collingwood - 1924 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 24:55-76.
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  50.  62
    Sensation and Function.S. Dumpleton - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (3):376-89.
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