Results for 'Seventeenth Century'

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  1.  6
    Reclaiming a New World: Fen Drainage, Improvement, and Projectors in Seventeenth-Century England.Eric H. Ash - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21 (5):445-469.
    The draining of the English Fens was one of the largest and most expensive agricultural improvement projects undertaken in early-modern England. Though the principal motivation was to make money from the improved land, many advocates of fen drainage emphasized the moral, utopian dimension of such projects, part of a much broader program for improvement and reform of all kinds to benefit the English Commonwealth. To those interested in pursuing good husbandry and agricultural improvement for their own sake, the Fens represented (...)
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  2.  9
    Becoming a Philosopher in Seventeenth-Century Britain.Richard Serjeantson - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 9.
    This chapter, which examines what it meant to become a philosopher and work in the field of philosophy in Great Britain during the seventeenth century, analyzes the factors that influenced people to become philosophers and describes the circumstances in which they studied philosophy. It identifies a pattern by which the schools provided a preliminary framework for becoming a philosopher that later served as a creative foil for the pursuit of a philosophical career beyond the schools. The chapter also (...)
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  3. Sympathetic Action in the Seventeenth Century: Human and Natural.Chris Meyns - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations (1):1-16.
    The category of sympathy marks a number of basic divisions in early modern approaches to action explanations, whether for human agency or for change in the wider natural world. Some authors were critical of using sympathy to explain change. They call such principles “unintelligible” or assume they involve “mysterious” action at a distance. Others, including Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, appeal to sympathy to capture natural phenomena, or to supply a backbone to their metaphysics. Here I discuss (...)
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  4.  91
    Philosophy of Mathematics and Mathematical Practice in the Seventeenth Century.Paolo Mancosu - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    The seventeenth century saw dramatic advances in mathematical theory and practice. With the recovery of many of the classical Greek mathematical texts, new techniques were introduced, and within 100 years, the rules of analytic geometry, geometry of indivisibles, arithmatic of infinites, and calculus were developed. Although many technical studies have been devoted to these innovations, Mancosu provides the first comprehensive account of the relationship between mathematical advances of the seventeenth century and the philosophy of mathematics of (...)
  5.  85
    Controlling the Passions: Passion, Memory, and the Moral Physiology of Self in Seventeenth-Century Neurophilosophy.John Sutton - 1998 - In S. Gaukroger (ed.), The Soft Underbelly of Reason: The Passions in the Seventeenth Century. Routledge. pp. 115-146.
    Some natural philosophers in the 17th century believed that they could control their own innards, specifically the animal spirits coursing incessantly through brain and nerves, in order to discipline or harness passion, cognition and action under rational guidance. This chapter addresses the mechanisms thought necessary after Eden for controlling the physiology of passion. The tragedy of human embedding in the body, with its cognitive and moral limitations, was paired with a sense of our confinement in sequential time. I use (...)
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  6. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical (...)
  7.  33
    Passion and Action: The Emotions in the Seventeenth Century Philosophy. [REVIEW]Marleen Rozemond - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):723-726.
    Book synopsis: Passion and Action explores the place of the emotions in seventeenth-century understandings of the body and mind, and the role they were held to play in reasoning and action. Interest in the passions pervaded all areas of philosophical enquiry, and was central to the theories of many major figures, including Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke. Yet little attention has been paid to this topic in studies of early modern thought. Susan James surveys the inheritance (...)
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  8. Materialism and the Activity of Matter in SeventeenthCentury European Philosophy.Stewart Duncan - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (11):671-680.
    Early modern debates about the nature of matter interacted with debates about whether matter could think. In particular, some philosophers (e.g., Cudworth and Leibniz) objected to materialism about the human mind on the grounds that matter is passive, thinking things are active, and one cannot make an active thing out of passive material. This paper begins by looking at two seventeenth-century materialist views (Hobbes’s, and one suggested but not endorsed by Locke) before considering that objection (which I call (...)
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  9. Experiment and Speculation in Seventeenth-Century Italy: The Case of Geminiano Montanari.Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:52-61.
    This paper reconstructs the natural philosophical method of Geminiano Montanari, one of the most prominent Italian natural philosophers of the late seventeenth century. Montanari’s views are used as a case study to assess recent claims concerning early modern experimental philosophy. Having presented the distinctive tenets of seventeenth-century experimental philosophers, I argue that Montanari adheres to them explicitly, thoroughly, and consistently. The study of Montanari’s views supports three claims. First, experimental philosophy was not an exclusively British phenomenon. (...)
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  10. Nominalism and Constructivism in Seventeenth-Century Mathematical Philosophy.David Sepkoski - 2012 - Routledge.
    What was the basis for the adoption of mathematics as the primary mode of discourse for describing natural events by a large segment of the philosophical community in the seventeenth century? In answering this question, this book demonstrates that a significant group of philosophers shared the belief that there is no necessary correspondence between external reality and objects of human understanding, which they held to include the objects of mathematical and linguistic discourse. The result is a scholarly reliable, (...)
     
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  11.  20
    Patriarchal Power as Unjust: Tyranny in Seventeenth-Century Venice.Marguerite Deslauriers - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (4):718-737.
    ABSTRACTIn the debate about the worth of women in sixteenth and seventeenth century Italy three pro-woman authors of the period, Moderata Fonte, Lucrezia Marinella, and Arcangela Tarabotti, develop...
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  12. The Deep Metaphysics of Quantum Gravity: The Seventeenth Century Legacy and an Alternative Ontology Beyond Substantivalism and Relationism.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):490-499.
    This essay presents an alternative to contemporary substantivalist and relationist interpretations of quantum gravity hypotheses by means of an historical comparison with the ontology of space in the seventeenth century. Utilizing differences in the spatial geometry between the foundational theory and the theory derived from the foundational, in conjunction with nominalism and platonism, it will be argued that there are crucial similarities between seventeenth century and contemporary theories of space, and that these similarities reveal a host (...)
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  13.  26
    Evidence and Faith: Philosophy and Religion Since the Seventeenth Century.Charles Taliaferro - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taliaferro has written a dynamic narrative history of philosophical reflection on religion from the seventeenth century to the present, with an emphasis on shifting views of faith and the nature of evidence. The book begins with the movement called Cambridge Platonism, which formed a bridge between the ancient and medieval worlds and early modern philosophy. While the book provides a general overview of different movements in philosophy, it also offers a detailed exposition and reflection on key arguments. (...)
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  14.  12
    Seventeenth-Century Moral Philosophy: Self Help, Self-Knowledge, and the Devil's Mountain.Aaron Garrett - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 229.
    This chapter focuses on the ethical theories of the early modern philosophers Thomas Hobbes, Justus Lipsius, Descartes, Spinoza, Benjamin Whichcote, Lord Shaftesbury, and Samuel Clarke. The discussions include aspects of Hobbes' moral philosophy that posed a challenge for many philosophers of the second half of the seventeenth century who were committed to philosophy as a form of self-help; Lipsius and Descartes' appropriation of ancient and Hellenistic moral philosophy in connection with changing ideas about control of the passions and (...)
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  15.  11
    Calvinist Metaphysics and the Eucharist in the Early Seventeenth Century.Giovanni Gellera - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1091-1110.
    This paper wishes to make a contribution to the study of how seventeenth-century scholasticism adapted to the new intellectual challenges presented by the Reformation. I focus in particular on the theory of accidents, which Reformed scholastic philosophers explored in search of a philosophical understanding of the rejection of the Catholic and Lutheran interpretations of the Eucharist. I argue that the Calvinist scholastics chose the view that actual inherence is part of the essence of accidents because it was coherent (...)
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  16.  85
    The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of 17th Century Philosophy offers a uniquely comprehensive and authoritative overview of early-modern philosophy written by an international team of specialists. As with previous Cambridge histories of philosophy the subject is treated by topic and theme, and since history does not come packaged in neat bundles, the subject is also treated with great temporal flexibility, incorporating frequent reference to medieval and Renaissance ideas. The basic structure of the volumes corresponds to the way an educated seventeenth (...)
  17.  15
    From van Helmont to Boyle. A Study of the Transmission of Helmontian Chemical and Medical Theories in Seventeenth-Century England.Antonio Clericuzio - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (3):303-334.
    Van Helmont's chemistry and medicine played a prominent part in the seventeenth-century opposition to Aristotelian natural philosophy and to Galenic medicine. Helmontian works, which rapidly achieved great notoriety all over Europe, gave rise to the most influential version of the chemical philosophy. Helmontian terms such as Archeus, Gas and Alkahest all became part of the accepted vocabulary of seventeenth-century science and medicine.
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  18.  66
    The Hunting of Leviathan: Seventeenth-Century Reactions to the Materialism and Moral Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.Samuel I. Mintz - 1962 - Thoemmes Press.
    Mintz examines seventeenth-century reactions to the political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.
  19.  26
    Preformation and Pre-Existence in the Seventeenth Century: A Brief Analysis.Peter J. Bowler - 1971 - Journal of the History of Biology 4 (2):221-244.
    It is beyond the scope of this paper to describe in detail the rise to popularity of the emboîtement theories during the last decades of the seventeenth century.51 Eventually the theories did gain great influence, but some points emerging from the above discussion indicate that the rise to popularity was not, perhaps, quite as rapid as has sometimes been assumed.52 Although the earlier preformation theories were sometimes regarded as the ancestors of the later ideas,53 there was little intellectual (...)
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  20. Soul and Mind: Life and Thought in the Seventeenth Century.Daniel Garber - 1998 - In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--559.
     
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  21.  66
    Philosophical Theory and Mathematical Practice in the Seventeenth Century.Douglas M. Jesseph - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):215.
    It is argued that, contrary to the standard accounts of the development of infinitesimal mathematics, the leading mathematicians of the seventeenth century were deeply concerned with the rigor of their methods. examples are taken from the work of cavalieri and leibniz, with further material drawn from guldin, barrow, and wallis.
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  22.  18
    From Stevin to Spinoza: An Essay on Philosophy in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Republic.Wiep van Bunge - 2001 - Brill.
    This book attempts to provide a general interpretation of the history of philosophy in the seventeenth-century Dutch Republic.
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  23. Natural Laws and Divine Agency in the Later Seventeenth Century.Dennis des Chene - unknown
    It is a commonplace that one of the primary tasks of natural science is to discover the laws of nature. Those who don’t think that nature has laws will of course disagree; but of those who do, most will be in accord with Armstrong when he writes that natural science, having discovered the kinds and properties of things, should “state the laws” which those things “obey” (Armstrong What is a law 3). No Scholastic philosopher would have included the discovery of (...)
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  24.  78
    Atomism, Lynceus, and the Fate of Seventeenth-Century Microscopy.C. H. Lüthy - 1996 - Early Science and Medicine 1 (1):1-27.
    Recent scholarship, focusing on the rapid decline of microscopy after the late 1680's, has shown that the limitations of microscopy and the ambivalent meaning of its findings led to a wide-spread sense of frustration with the new instrument. The present article tries to connect this fall from favor with the microscope's equally surprising but hitherto little noticed late rise to prominence. The crucial point is that when the microscope, more than a decade after the telescope, finally managed to arouse the (...)
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  25.  8
    Adam Boreel and Galenus Abrahamsz. Against Constraint of Consciences: Seventeenth-Century Dissenters in Favor of Religious Toleration.Francesco Quatrini - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (8):1127-1140.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines two seventeenth-century works written by Adam Boreel and Galenus Abrahamsz, two most famous scholars among the Amsterdam Collegiants who advocated ideas in favour of religious toleration. This study is divided in three main parts. Firstly, I give historical information on the circumstances that led Galenus Abrahamsz to write his work. Secondly, I make a thorough comparison between Abrahamsz’s work and Boreel’s treatise, arguing that the latter exerted great influence on the former. However, despite major parallels, (...)
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  26.  8
    Looking Beyond Home Shores: Dutch Tolerance at the End of the Seventeenth Century.Luisa Simonutti - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (8):1092-1110.
    ABSTRACTThe Dutch history of the golden century, a formula which had effectively imposed this interpretative paradigm well beyond the seventeenth century, has been analysed in a more conscientious manner by more recent historiography. This has tempered the hagiographic reading and confirmed the fact that, in the second half of the century, the question of tolerance had become primarily a political conquest and a value shared by other nations. A supernational, European value, but which had also begun (...)
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  27.  64
    On the Status of Proofs by Contradiction in the Seventeenth Century.Paolo Mancosu - 1991 - Synthese 88 (1):15 - 41.
    In this paper I show that proofs by contradiction were a serious problem in seventeenth century mathematics and philosophy. Their status was put into question and positive mathematical developments emerged from such reflections. I analyse how mathematics, logic, and epistemology are intertwined in the issue at hand. The mathematical part describes Cavalieri's and Guldin's mathematical programmes of providing a development of parts of geometry free of proofs by contradiction. The logical part shows how the traditional Aristotelean doctrine that (...)
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  28.  74
    Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than (...)
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  29.  43
    The Isomorphism of Space, Time and Matter in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy.Carla Rita Palmerino - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):296-330.
    This article documents the general tendency of seventeenth-century natural philosophers, irrespective of whether they were atomists or anti-atomists, to regard space, time and matter as magnitudes having the same internal composition. It examines the way in which authors such as Fromondus, Basson, Sennert, Arriaga, Galileo, Magnen, Descartes, Gassendi, Charleton as well as the young Newton motivated their belief in the isomorphism of space, time and matter, and how this belief reflected on their views concerning the relation between geometry (...)
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  30.  60
    The Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Rationalism.G. H. R. Parkinson (ed.) - 1993 - Routledge.
    The Routledge History of Philosophy, Volume 4 covers a period of three hundred and fifty years, from the middle of the fourteenth century to the early years of the eighteenth century and the birth of modern philosophy. The focus of this volume is on Renaissance philosophy and seventeenth-century rationalism, particularly that of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Science was ascendant during the Renaissance and beyond, and the Copernican revolution represented the philosophical climax of the middle ages. This (...)
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  31.  9
    Natural Philosophy in the Graduation Theses of the Scottish Universities in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century.Giovanni Gellera - unknown
    The graduation theses of the Scottish universities in the first half of the seventeenth century are at the crossroads of philosophical and historical events of fundamental importance: Renaissance and Humanist philosophy, Scholastic and modern philosophy, Reformation and Counterreformation, the rise of modern science. The struggle among these tendencies shaped the culture of the seventeenth century. Graduation theses are a product of the Scholasticism of the modern age, which survived the Reformation in Scotland and decisively influenced Scottish (...)
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  32. Insiders and Outsiders in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.G. A. J. Rogers, Tom Sorell & Jill Kraye (eds.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    Seventeenth-century philosophy scholars come together in this volume to address the Insiders--Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, and Hobbes--and Outsiders--Pierre Gassendi, Kenelm Digby, Theophilus Gale, Ralph Cudworth and Nicholas Malebranche--of the philosocial canon, and the ways in which reputations are created and confirmed. In their own day, these ten figures were all considered to be thinkers of substantial repute, and it took some time for the Insiders to come to be regarded as major and original philosophers. Today these Insiders all (...)
     
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  33.  20
    The Development of Telescope Optics in the Middle of the Seventeenth Century.Rolf Willach - 2001 - Annals of Science 58 (4):381-398.
    The author performed optical tests on four telescopes dating from the first half of the seventeenth century and on four objective lenses made by the Italian optician Giuseppe Campani. These tests consisted of the method of Ronchi and of the highly sensitive method of Foucault on an optical bench. The two incomplete surviving telescopes in Skokloster made by Wiesel have been reconstructed and compared with a telescope made by Divini and a telescope made by Campani. The contributions of (...)
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  34.  7
    Once Snell Breaks Down: From Geometrical to Physical Optics in the Seventeenth Century.Fokko Jan Dijksterhuis - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (2):165-185.
    Snell's law of refraction did not affect the study of optics until twenty‐five years after its publication in 1637 and by then its universality threatened to break down already. Two optical phenomena—colour dispersion and strange refraction—were discovered that did not conform to the sine law. In the early 1670s, Isaac Newton and Christiaan Huygens respectively investigated these phenomena. They tried to describe the irregular behaviour of light rays mathematically and to reconcile it with ordinary refraction. This paper discusses their investigations (...)
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  35.  22
    Kabbalah, Education, and Prayer: Jewish Learning in the Seventeenth Century.Gerold Necker - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):621-630.
    In the seventeenth century, the Jewish mystical tradition which is known as Kabbalah was integrated into the curriculum of studying the Hebrew Bible and the Talmud. Kabbalah became popular in these times in the wake of the dissemination of Isaac Luria’s teachings, in particular within the Jewish communities in Prague and Amsterdam, where members of the Horowitz family took a leading role. Kabbalistic psychology was applied to the whole Jewish lifestyle then, and to the understanding of Jewish tradition. (...)
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  36.  72
    Science and Instruments: The Telescope as a Scientific Instrument at the Beginning of the Seventeenth Century.Yaakov Zik - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (3):259-284.
    : Scientific observation is determined by the human sensory system, which generally relies on instruments that serve as mediators between the world and the senses. Instruments came in the shape of Heron's Dioptra, Levi Ben Gerson's Cross-staff, Egnatio Danti's Torqvetto Astronomico, Tycho's Quadrant, Galileo's Geometric Military Compass, or Kepler's Ecliptic Instrument. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, however, it was unclear how an instrument such as the telescope could be employed to acquire new information and expand knowledge (...)
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  37.  26
    Geometry and Surveying in Early-Seventeenth-Century England.J. A. Bennett - 1991 - Annals of Science 48 (4):345-354.
    In the late sixteenth century a number of mathematicians tried to introduce geometrical methods into surveying practice, to be based on simplified astronomical instruments, angle measurement, and triangulation. A measure of success is indicated by the acceptance of the simple theodolite, but the surveyors resisted such complex instruments as the altazimuth theodolite, recipiangle, and trigonometer. Counter-proposals, in particular the plane table, threatened to undermine the geometrical programme, but by the mid-seventeenth century a stable compromise had evolved. Among (...)
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  38.  30
    Moral Philosophy at Seventeenth-Century Harvard; A Discipline in Transition. [REVIEW]Harvey C. Mansfield Jr - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):116-118.
    While intended more for intellectual historians than for philosophers or Harvardians, this book will be found valuable by all three of these groups, hitherto considered distinct. The author announces three themes: the Harvard curriculum of moral philosophy in the seventeenth century; the transition in that century from scholasticism to Cartesianism, as visible in the great change in Harvard texts from 1650 to 1710; and a more specific argument that the influence of eighteenth-century sentimentalism was prepared by (...)
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  39.  27
    British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century by Sarah Hutton.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):677-678.
    Most of our histories of philosophy, in our books and especially in our courses, are what William James called “appreciative chronicle[s] of human master-strokes”. They resemble tours of grand and isolated monuments. Sarah Hutton’s magnificent British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century is a different kind of history, in which masterpieces are placed in conversation with books that are now neglected or all but forgotten. By means of this “conversation model,” Hutton provides what she justly terms “a ‘thick description’ (...)
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  40.  8
    Walter Charleton's Early Life 1620–1659, and Relationship to Natural Philosophy in Mid-Seventeenth Century England.B. A. Sharp - 2006 - Annals of Science 30 (3):311-340.
    (1973). Walter Charleton's early life 1620–1659, and relationship to natural philosophy in mid-seventeenth century England. Annals of Science: Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 311-340.
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  41.  32
    The Soft Underbelly of Reason: The Passions in the Seventeenth Century.Stephen Gaukroger (ed.) - 1998 - Routledge.
    This book provides a valuable understanding on the different views of the passions in the Seventeenth Century. The contributors show that fundamental questions about the nature of wisdom, goodness and beauty were understood in terms of the contrast between reason and passions in this era. Those with an interest in philosophy, the history of medicene, and women's studies will find this collection a fascinating read.
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  42.  72
    God and the Natural World in the Seventeenth Century: Space, Time, and Causality.Geoffrey Gorham - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (5):859-872.
    The employment by seventeenth-century natural philosophers of stock theological notions like creation, immensity, and eternity in the articulation and justification of emerging physical programs disrupted a delicate but longstanding balance between transcendent and immanent conceptions of God. By playing a prominent (if not always leading) role in many of the major scientific developments of the period, God became more intimately involved with natural processes than at any time since antiquity. In this discussion, I am particularly concerned with the (...)
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  43.  40
    Questioning Thunderstones and Arrowheads: The Problem of Recognizing and Interpreting Stone Artifacts in the Seventeenth Century.Matthew Goodrum - 2008 - Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):482-508.
    Flint arrowheads, spearheads, and axe heads made by prehistoric Europeans were generally considered before the eighteenth century to be a naturally produced stone that formed in storm clouds and fell with lightning. These stones were called ceraunia, or thunderstones, and it was not until the sixteenth century that their status as a natural phenomenon was challenged. During the seventeenth century natural historians and antiquaries began to suggest that these ceraunia were not thunderstones but ancient human artifacts. (...)
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  44.  37
    Alchemy and Chemistry: Chemical Discourses in the Seventeenth Century.Ferdinando Abbri - 2000 - Early Science and Medicine 5 (2):214-226.
    The landscape of seventeenth-century chemistry is complex, and it is impossible to find in it either a clear-cut distinction between alchemy and chemistry or a sort of simple identification of the two. The seventeenth-century cultural context contained a rich variety of "chemical" discourses with arguments ranging from specific experiments to the justification of the validity of chemistry and its novelty in terms of its extraordinary antiquity. On the basis of an analysis of the works by O. (...)
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  45.  18
    Feminine Wiles and Masculine Weakness: Seventeenth-Century Visual Responses to Tasso’s Crusade.Daniel M. Unger - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (8):812-835.
    This essay offers a political reading of the artistic choices made by seventeenth-century painters in their depictions of the heroines of Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered. It discusses the political subtext of Tasso’s epic poem by exploring the roles Tasso assigns to his oriental heroines and their representation in seventeenth-century paintings. Painters and patrons alike were particularly enthusiastic about the love stories that developed around Jerusalem. But Tasso is promoting a crusade, and the visual focus of later painters (...)
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  46.  17
    The Arguments on Void in the Seventeenth Century: The Case of Francis Bacon.Silvia Manzo - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Science 36 (1):43-61.
    Francis Bacon's position on the existence of void and its nature has been mostly studied with regard to his views on the atom. This approach is undoubtedly right, but it disregards further topics related to Bacon's account of void, namely the world system and the transmutation of bodies. Consequently, a more comprehensive study of Bacon's view on vacuum seems desirable where all the contexts are taken into account. To address this desideratum, the present paper examines Bacon's different views on vacuum (...)
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  47.  16
    Stoicism in Descartes, Pascal, and Spinoza: Examining Neostoicism’s Influence in the Seventeenth Century.Daniel Collette - unknown
    My dissertation focuses on the moral philosophy of Descartes, Pascal, and Spinoza in the context of the revival of Stoicism within the seventeenth century. There are many misinterpretations about early modern ethical theories due to a lack of proper awareness of Stoicism in the early modern period. My project rectifies this by highlighting understated Stoic themes in these early modern texts that offer new clarity to their morality. Although these three philosophers hold very different metaphysical commitments, each embraces (...)
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  48.  20
    Probability and Certainty in Seventeenth-Century England. A Study of the Relationships Between Natural Science, Religion, History, Law, and Literature.William A. Wallace - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (2):375-377.
    This ambitious study, by a professor of rhetoric, proposes itself as "intellectual history in a traditional sense" and not as philosophical discourse. Though philosophy does not appear in its title, however, much of its content will appear to philosophers as pertaining to their discipline, and the thesis it develops surely commends itself to philosophical critique. The author's aim, at least in part, is to challenge "the commonly held view" that the scientific revolution created or intensified the modern division between the (...)
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  49.  15
    A Pre-History of Quantum Gravity: The Seventeenth Century Legacy and the Deep Metaphysics of Space Beyond Substantivalism and Relationism.Edward Slowik - unknown
    This essay demonstrates the inadequacy of contemporary substantivalist and relationist interpretations of quantum gravity hypotheses via an historical investigation of the debate on the underlying ontology of space in the seventeenth century. Viewed in the proper context, there are crucial similarities between seventeenth century theories of space and contemporary work on the ontological foundations of spacetime theories, and these similarities challenge the utility of the substantival/relational dichotomy by revealing a host of underlying conceptual issues that do (...)
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    [REVIEW] The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):617-19.
    The seventeenth century witnessed the first publications that argued for the equality of men and women. Desmond M. Clarke presents new translations of the three most important ones, with excerpts from the authors' related writings, together with an extensive introduction to the religious and philosophical context within which they argued.
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