Results for 'Sex'

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  1.  68
    This Sex Which Is Not One.Luce Irigaray - 1985 - Cornell University Press.
    In eleven acute and widely ranging essays, Irigaray reconsiders the question of female sexuality in a variety of contexts that are relevant to current discussion of feminist (...)
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  2. Sex Differences in Human Mate Preferences: Evolutionary Hypotheses Tested in 37 Cultures.David M. Buss - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):1-14.
    Contemporary mate preferences can provide important clues to human reproductive history. Little is known about which characteristics people value in potential mates. Five predictions were made about (...)
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  3. Sex, Lies, and Consent.Tom Dougherty - 2013 - Ethics 123 (4):717-744.
    How wrong is it to deceive someone into sex by lying, say, about one's profession? The answer is seriously wrong when the liar's actual profession would (...) be a deal breaker for the victim of the deception: this deception vitiates the victim's sexual consent, and it is seriously wrong to have sex with someone while lacking his or her consent. (shrink)
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  4. From Sex Robots to Love Robots: Is Mutual Love with a Robot Possible?Sven Nyholm & Lily Frank - forthcoming - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social Implications and Ethical. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    Some critics of sex-robots worry that their use might spread objectifying attitudes about sex, and common sense places a higher value on sex within love-relationships than (...) on casual sex. If there could be mutual love between humans and sex-robots, this could help to ease the worries about objectifying attitudes. And mutual love between humans and sex-robots, if possible, could also help to make this sex more valuable. But is mutual love between humans and robots possible, or even conceivable? We discuss three clusters of ideas and associations commonly discussed within the philosophy of love, and relate these to the topic of whether mutual love could be achieved between humans and sex-robots: (i) the idea of love as agood match”; (ii) the idea of valuing each other in our distinctive particularity; and (iii) the idea of a steadfast commitment. We consider relations among these ideas and the sort of agency and free will that we attribute to human romantic partners. Our conclusion is that mutual love between humans and advanced sex-robots is not an altogether impossible proposition. However, it is unlikely that we will be able to create robots sophisticated enough to be able to participate in love-relationships anytime soon. -/- . (shrink)
     
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  5.  62
    Sex Differences in Human Brain Asymmetry: a Critical Survey.Jeannette McGlone - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):215-227.
  6. Robot Sex and Consent: Is Consent to Sex Between a Robot and a Human Conceivable, Possible, and Desirable?Lily Frank & Sven Nyholm - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):305-323.
    The development of highly humanoid sex robots is on the technological horizon. If sex robots are integrated into the legal community aselectronic persons”, the issue of (...)
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  7. Sex and Circumcision.Brian D. Earp - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (2):43-45.
    What are the effects of circumcision on sexual function and experience? And what does sexin the sense related to genderhave to do with the ethics of (...) circumcision? Jacobs and Arora (2015) give short shrift to the first of these questions; and they do not seem to have considered the second. In this commentary, I explore the relationship between sex (in both senses) and infant male circumcision, and draw some conclusions about the ongoing debate regarding this controversial practice. (shrink)
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  8. Evaluating Arguments for the Sex/Gender Distinction.Tomas Bogardus - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):873-892.
    Many philosophers believe that our ordinary English words man and woman aregender terms,” and gender is distinct from biological sex. That is, they believe womanhood and (...)
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  9. Is Sex Binary?Alex Byrne - 2018 - Arc Digital (nov 1).
    Response to Anne Fausto-Sterling's New York Times Op-Ed, in which she purports to explain why sex isn't binary.
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  10.  60
    Sex Selection in India: Why a Ban is Not Justified.Aksel Braanen Sterri - 2020 - Developing World Bioethics 20 (3):150-156.
    When widespread use of sexselective abortion and sex selection through assisted reproduction lead to severe harms to third parties and perpetuate discrimination, should these practices be (...)banned? In this paper I focus on India and show why a common argument for a ban on sex selection fails even in these circumstances. I set aside a common objection to the argument, namely that women have a right to procreative autonomy that trumps the state's interest in protecting other parties from harm, and argue against the ban on consequentialist grounds. I perform a pairwise comparative analysis of sex selection and its plausible alternatives and argue that that the ban fails to improve the state of affairs relative to a scenario without a ban. The ban makes the situation worse, especially for mothers and their daughters. India should therefore repeal its ban on sex selection. (shrink)
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  11. Sex and Death: An Introduction to Philosophy of Biology[REVIEW]Mohan Matthen - 2002 - Philosophical Books 43 (1):78-80.
  12. Is Sex Socially Constructed?Alex Byrne - 2018 - Arc Digital (nov 30).
    Three arguments for the thesis that sex is socially constructed are examined and rejected. No such argument could succeed, because sex is not socially constructed.
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  13. Robot Sex. Social and Ethical Implications.John Danaher & Neil McArthur - 2017 - MIT Press.
    Sexbots are coming. Given the pace of technological advances, it is inevitable that realistic robots specifically designed for people's sexual gratification will be developed in the (...)not-too-distant future. Despite popular culture's fascination with the topic, and the emergence of the much-publicized Campaign Against Sex Robots, there has been little academic research on the social, philosophical, moral, and legal implications of robot sex. This book fills the gap, offering perspectives from philosophy, psychology, religious studies, economics, and law on the possible future of robot-human sexual relationships. (shrink)
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  14.  15
    Sex Robot Fantasies.Robert Sparrow - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (1):33-34.
    Nancy Jecker is right when she says that older persons ought not to be ashamed if they wish to remain sexually active in advanced old age. She (...)
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  15. Same-Sex Marriage and Equality.Reginald Williams - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (5):589-595.
    Some argue that same-sex marriage is not an equal rights issue because, where same-sex marriage is illegal, heterosexuals and homosexuals have the exact same right to (...) marryi.e., the right to marry one adult of the opposite sex. I dispute this argument by pointing out that while societies that prohibit same-sex marriage equally permit individual heterosexuals and homosexuals to marry one adult of the opposite sex, same-sex couples in such societies are denied an important right that opposite-sex couples enjoyi.e., the right to marry. I argue that the right to marry is fundamentally, not an individual right, but a couples collective right, analogous to assembly rights. (shrink)
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  16.  83
    Extended Sex: An Account of Sex for a More Just Society.Saray Ayala & Nadya Vasilyeva - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):725-742.
    We propose an externalist understanding of sex that builds upon extended and distributed approaches to cognition, and contributes to building a more just, diversity-sensitive society. Current (...)sex categorization practices according to the female/male dichotomy are not only inaccurate and incoherent, but they also ground moral and political pressures that harm and oppress people. We argue that a new understanding of sex is due, an understanding that would acknowledge the variability and, most important, the flexibility of sex properties, as well as the moral and political meaning of sex categorization. We propose an externalist account of sex, elaborating on extended and distributed approaches to cognition that capitalize on the natural capacity of organisms to couple with environmental resources. We introduce the notion of extended sex, and argue that properties relevant for sex categorization are neither exclusively internal to the individual skin, nor fixed. Finally, we spell out the potential of extended sex to support an active defense of diversity and an intervention against sex-based discrimination. (shrink)
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  17. Sex Trafficking: Trends, Challenges, and the Limitations of International Law[REVIEW]Heather M. Smith - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (3):271-286.
    The passage of the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children in 2000 marked the first global effort to address (...)
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  18. Sex, Gender and Science.Myra J. Hird - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In Sex, Gender and Science , Myra Hird outlines the social study of science and nature, specifically in relation to sex, sex differences, and sexuality. She examines how (...) Western understandings of sex are based less upon understanding material sex differences than on a discourse that emphasizes sex dichotomy over sex diversity and argues for a feminist engagement with scientific debate that embraces the diversity and complexity of nature. (shrink)
     
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  19. Sex Work, Technological Unemployment and the Basic Income Guarantee.John Danaher - 2014 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (1):113-130.
    Is sex work (specifically, prostitution) vulnerable to technological unemployment? Several authors have argued that it is. They claim that the advent of sophisticated sexual robots will lead (...)
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  20.  70
    Sex and Culture.Joseph Daniel Unwin - 1934 - London: Oxford University Press UK.
  21.  8
    Are Sex Robots Enough?Alexander A. Boni-Saenz - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (1):35-35.
    Nancy Jeckers essay Nothing to be Ashamed of: Sex Robots for Older Adults with Disabilities 1 presents a provocative application of the capabilities approach. Her ethical (...)argument for providing access to sex robots for older adults with disabilities proceeds in five parts: 1. Older adults frequently suffer disabilities that impair sexual functioning. 2. The ability to function sexually is linked to central human capabilities, including: the ability to generate a personally meaningful life narrative; be physically, mentally and emotionally healthy; experience bodily integrity; feel and express a range of human emotions; affiliate deeply with others; and reflect on and choose a plan for their life. 3. Society should take reasonable steps to support these human capabilities at a minimal threshold as part of a broader duty to respect human dignity. 4. Providing access to sex robots comprises part of reasonable efforts to support the six capabilities at a minimal threshold. 5. Therefore, society ought to make reasonable efforts to ensure access to sex robots for older adults with disabilities that impair sexual functioning. I am sympathetic to this line of reasoning, having proposed a series of legal reforms that would facilitate sexual expression among older adults with cognitive impairments as well.2 3 …. (shrink)
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  22. Sex Selection and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: A Response to the Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.Edgar Dahl & Julian Savulescu - 2000 - Human Reproduction 15 (9):1879-1880.
    In its recent statement 'Sex Selection and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis', the Ethics Committee of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine concluded that preimplantation genetic diagnosis for sex (...)
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  23.  7
    Considering Sex Robots for Older Adults with Cognitive Impairments.Andria Bianchi - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (1):37-38.
    Determining whether and/or how to enable older persons with disabilities to engage in sex raises several ethical considerations. With the goal of enabling the sexual functioning (...)of older adults with disabilities, Jecker argues that sex robots could be used as a helpful tool. In her article, ‘Nothing to be Ashamed of: Sex Robots for Older Adults with Disabilities’, Jecker acknowledges the importance of sexual functioning and the fact that ageist assumptions incorrectly classify older persons as asexual. Additionally, older adults may experience disabilities that negatively influence their sexual functioning, which is problematic since sex may be linked to the following capabilities: developing a meaningful life narrative; being healthy; experiencing bodily integrity; feeling and communicating emotions; affiliating with others and reflecting on and choosing a life plan.1 In accordance with Nussbaums capabilities approach,2 Jecker says that society has a duty to support these capabilities at a minimal threshold. And insofar as sexual functioning may be relevant to the capabilities for older adults with disabilities, then we need to respond accordingly. One way of achieving this aim is by providing access to sex robots. I agree that sex robots ought to be made available for older adults with disabilities. Nevertheless, the article inspires several areas for further exploration. As Jecker rightfully mentions, older adults are often incorrectly labelled as non-sexual. For instance, in their analysis of older individualsviews on sex and quality of life, Gott …. (shrink)
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  24. Sex Differences in Intrinsic Aptitude for Mathematics and Science?Elizabeth S. Spelke - unknown
    This article considers 3 claims that cognitive sex differ- ences account for the differential representation of men and women in high-level careers in mathematics and sci- (...)ence: (a) males are more focused on objects from the beginning of life and therefore are predisposed to better learning about mechanical systems; (b) males have a pro- file of spatial and numerical abilities producing greater aptitude for mathematics; and (c) males are more variable in their cognitive abilities and therefore predominate at the upper reaches of mathematical talent. Research on cogni- tive development in human infants, preschool children, and students at all levels fails to support these claims. Instead, it provides evidence that mathematical and scientific rea- soning develop from a set of biologically based cognitive capacities that males and females share. These capacities lead men and women to develop equal talent for mathe- matics and science. (shrink)
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  25. Money, Sex, and Power: Toward a Feminist Historical Materialism.Nancy C. M. Hartsock - 1983 - Northeastern University Press.
  26.  12
    Without Sex: An Appraisal of Žižeks Posthumanism.Jan Gresil Kahambing - 2018 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 12 (2).
    In this paper, I assess Žižeks articleNo Sex, Please, Were Post-human!” as a provocative injunction to signal the posthuman ecstasy and deterrence. I seek (...) to expose, rather than express, Žižeks posthumanist perspective as a paradoxical intertwining of different aspects of perspectivizing a post-human being from the view of the end of sexualitythe background that informs a posthuman future. Žižeks eluding the subjects confrontation with the question of sexual difference to the apex of the genome project touches the delicate coalescing of the notions ofobjectivity and subjectivityandvirtuality and realityin the fate of the body. Ultimately, he renders this inception of this tarrying as a traumatic encounter that informs us of the existential birthright of a true posthuman. (shrink)
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  27. Sex Under Pressure: Jerks, Boorish Behavior, and Gender Hierarchy[REVIEW]Scott A. Anderson - 2005 - Res Publica 11 (4):349-369.
    Pressuring someone into having sex would seem to differ in significant ways from pressuring someone into investing in ones business or buying an expensive bauble. In (...)affirming this claim, I take issue with a recent essay by Sarah Conly (‘Seduction, Rape, and Coercion’, Ethics, October 2004), who thinks that pressuring into sex can be helpfully evaluated by analogy to these other instances of using pressure. Drawing upon work by Alan Wertheimer, the leading theorist of coercion, she argues that so long as pressuring does not amount to coercing someone into having sex, her consent to sex answers the important ethical questions about it. In this essay, I argue that to understand the real significance of pressuring into sex, we need to appeal to background considerations, especially the male-dominant gender hierarchy, which renders sexual pressuring different from its non-sexual analogues. Treating pressure to have sex like any other sort of interpersonal pressure obscures the role such sexual pressure might play in supporting gender hierarchy, and fails to explain why pressure by men against women is more problematic than pressure by women against men. I suggest that men pressuring women to have sex differs from the reverse case because of at least two factors: (1) gendered social institutions which add to the pressures against women, and (2) the greater likelihood that men, not women, will use violence if denied, and the lesser ability of women compared to men to resist such violence without harm. (shrink)
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  28.  28
    Sex Differences in Mathematical Reasoning Ability in Intellectually Talented Preadolescents: Their Nature, Effects, and Possible Causes.Camilla Persson Benbow - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):169-183.
  29.  51
    Sex Differences in Cognition.Hugh Fairweather - 1976 - Cognition 4 (3):231-280.
  30.  82
    Sex, Attachment, and the Development of Reproductive Strategies.Marco Del Giudice - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):1-21.
    This target article presents an integrated evolutionary model of the development of attachment and human reproductive strategies. It is argued that sex differences in attachment emerge in (...)
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  31.  64
    Sex and Age Differences in Mate-Selection Preferences.Sascha Schwarz & Manfred Hassebrauck - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (4):447-466.
    For nearly 70 years, studies have shown large sex differences in human mate selection preferences. However, most of the studies were restricted to a limited set of (...)
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  32. Debating Sex Work.Jessica Flanigan & Lori Watson - 2019 - New York: Oup Usa.
    In this "for and against" book, ethicists Lori Watson and Jessica Flanigan debate the criminalization of sex work. Watson argues for a sex equality approach to prostitution (...)
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  33.  29
    How Sex Selection Undermines Reproductive Autonomy.Tamara Browne - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):195-204.
    Non-medical sex selection is premised on the notion that the sexes are not interchangeable. Studies of individuals who undergo sex selection for non-medical reasons, or who (...) have a preference for a son or daughter, show that they assume their child will conform to the stereotypical roles and norms associated with their sex. However, the evidence currently available has not succeeded in showing that the gender traits and inclinations sought are caused by amale brainor afemale brain”. Therefore, as far as we know, there is no biological reason why parents cannot have the kind of parenting experience they seek with a child of any sex. Yet gender essentialism, a set of unfounded assumptions about the sexes which pervade society and underpin sexism, prevents parents from realising this freedom. In other words, unfounded assumptions about gender constrain not only a childs autonomy, but also the parents. To date, reproductive autonomy in relation to sex selection has predominantly been regarded merely as the freedom to choose the sex of ones child. This paper points to at least two interpretations of reproductive autonomy and argues that sex selection, by being premised on gender essentialism and/or the social pressure on parents to ensure their children conform to gender norms, undermines reproductive autonomy on both accounts. (shrink)
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  34.  16
    Sex and Justice.Brian Skyrms - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (6):305-320.
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  35.  44
    Sex Selection: Laissez Faire or Family Balancing?Edgar Dahl - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (1):87-90.
    In a recent comment on the HFEAs public consultation on sex selection, Soren Holm claimed that proponents of family balancing are committed to embrace a laissez (...)faire approach. Given that arguments in support of sex selection for family balancing also support sex selection for other social reasons, advocates of family balancing, he asserts, are simply inconsistent when calling for a limit on access to sex selection. In this paper, I argue that proponents of family balancing are in no way inconsistent. Provided their advocacy of family balancing is aimed at preventing a severe distortion of the natural sex ratio, they are entirely justified in insisting on restrictions to sex selection. The real question is whether a concern for the sex ratio does indeed call for a limit on sex selection. Based on a recent survey on gender preferences and data from several Gender Clinics, I argue that a restriction on sex selection to family balancing is unwarranted. In the absence of any evidence for a pending sex ratio distortion, we are actually required to adopt a laissez faire approach to sex selection. (shrink)
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  36. Sex Rights for the Disabled?Jacob M. Appel - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (3):152-154.
    The public discourse surrounding sex and severe disability over the past 40 years has largely focused on protecting vulnerable populations from abuse. However, health professionals and activists (...)
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  37.  19
    Sex Differences in Early Embryogenesis: InterChromosomal Regulation Sets the Stage for SexBiased Gene Networks.Nora Engel - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800073.
    Sexspecific transcriptional and epigenomic profiles are detectable in the embryo very soon after fertilization. I propose that in male (XY) and female (XX) preimplantation embryos sex (...) chromosomes establish sexually dimorphic interactions with the autosomes, before overt differences become apparent and long before gonadogenesis. Lineage determination restricts expression biases between the sexes, but the epigenetic differences are less constrained and can be perpetuated, accounting for dimorphisms that arise later in life. In this way, sexual identity is registered in the epigenome very early in development. As development progresses, sexspecific regulatory modules are harbored within shared transcriptional networks that delineate common traits. In reviewing this field, I propose that analyzing the mechanisms for sexual dimorphisms at the molecular and biochemical level and incorporating developmental and environmental factors will lead to a greater understanding of sex differences in health and disease. (shrink)
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  38. Sex, Breakfast, and Descriptus Interruptus.Kenneth A. Taylor - 2001 - Synthese 128 (1-2):45 - 61.
  39. Race/Sex: Their Sameness, Difference and Interplay.Naomi Zack (ed.) - 1997 - Routledge.
    ____Race/Sex__ is the first forum for combined discussion of racial theory and gender theory. In sixteen articles, avant-garde scholars of African American philosophy and liberatory criticism (...) explore and explode the categories of race, sex and gender into new trajectories that include sexuality, black masculinity and mixed-race identity. (shrink)
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  40.  55
    Is Sex Really Necessary? And Other Questions for Lewens.Mohan Matthen - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):297-308.
    It has been claimed that certain forms of individual essentialism render the Theory of Natural Selection unable to explain why any given individual has the traits it (...)
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  41.  48
    Sex, Vagueness, and the Olympics.Helen L. Daly - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):708-724.
    Sex determines much about one's life, but what determines one's sex? The answer is complicated and incomplete: on close examination, ordinary notions of female and male (...) are vague. In 2012, the International Olympic Committee further specified what they mean by woman in response to questions about who, exactly, is eligible to compete in women's Olympic events. I argue, first, that their stipulation is evidence that the use of vague terms is better described by semantic approaches to vagueness than by epistemic approaches. In addition, the IOC's 2012 stipulation was made with sensitivity to its practical consequences. Linguistic actions often have morally relevant consequences, and I contend that, other things equal, we should adopt theories about language that acknowledge the responsibility we bear for what we say. Taking vagueness to be an epistemic phenomenon precludes the sense of agency needed for moral responsibility; taking it to be semantic does not. Thus I advance two arguments for semantic approaches to vagueness, as against epistemic approaches: one descriptive and one normative. (shrink)
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  42. Sex and Sensibility: The Role of Social Selection: Roughgarden, Joan: The Genial Gene: Deconstructing Darwinian Selfishness. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009, Ix+261pp, $40.00 HB, $18.95 PB.Erika L. Milam, Roberta L. Millstein, Angela Potochnik & Joan E. Roughgarden - 2011 - Metascience 20 (2):253-277.
    Sex and sensibility: The role of social selection Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9464-6 Authors Erika L. Milam, Department of History, University of Maryland (...), 2115 Francis Scott Key Hall, College Park, MD 20742, USA Roberta L. Millstein, Department of Philosophy, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA Angela Potochnik, Department of Philosophy, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210374, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA Joan E. Roughgarden, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796. (shrink)
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  43.  36
    Sex Differences in Interest in Infants Across the Lifespan.Dario Maestripieri & Suzanne Pelka - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (3):327-344.
    This study investigated sex differences in interest in infants among children, adolescents, young adults, and older individuals. Interest in infants was assessed with responses to images depicting (...)
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  44. Sex and Sexuality.Raja Halwani - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45.  35
    Sex: a Transdisciplinary Concept. From Structure to Rhizome: Transdisciplinarity in French Thought (1).Stella Sandford - 2011 - Radical Philosophy 165:23-30.
    What is sex? Some feminists have harboured suspicions about this form of question, given its philosophical (ormetaphysical1) pedigree. But philosophy no longer has the disciplinary (...)monopoly on it. Indeed, with regard to sex, the more interesting task today is to pose and to attempt to answer the question from within a transdisciplinary problematic. For the question requires a theoretical response capable of recognizing that it concerns a cultural and political (and therefore neither a specifically philosophical nor a merely empirical) problem. It requires an account of sex which is theoretically satisfying whilst being both adequate to and critical of everyday experience; a critical-theoretical account capable of embracing the everyday experience of sex, its lived contradictions. This article represents a first attempt to construct a transdisciplinary concept of sex to this end. It traces a line from Simone de Beauvoirs The Second Sex to some recent attempts to definesexand various related but importantly different concepts, and ends by proposing an answer to the questionWhat is sex?’ that draws on the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. For our transdisciplinary efforts will of necessity spring from some specific discipline(s) while not remaining confined within them, and not allowing them to remained confined within themselves (which has been something of a problem for philosophy, historically). (shrink)
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  46. The Metaphysics of Sex and Gender.Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir - 2011 - In Charlotte Witt (ed.), Feminist Metaphysics. Springer.
    In this chapter I offer an interpretation of Judith Butlers metaphysics of sex and gender and situate it in the ontological landscape alongside what has long (...)been the received view of sex and gender in the English speaking world, which owes its inspiration to the works of Simone de Beauvoir. I then offer a critique of Butlers view, as interpreted, and subsequently an original account of sex and gender, according to which both are constructedor conferred, as I would put italbeit in different ways and subject to different constraints. (shrink)
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  47. Sex in Public.Lauren Berlant & Michael Warner - 1998 - Critical Inquiry 24 (2):547-566.
  48. Sex, Syntax, and Semantics.Lera Boroditsky, Lauren A. Schmidt & Webb Phillips - 2003 - In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press. pp. 61--79.
  49.  49
    Sex Differences in Pain.Karen J. Berkley - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):371-380.
    Are there sex differences in pain? For experimentally delivered somatic stimuli, females have lower thresholds, greater ability to discriminate, higher pain ratings, and less tolerance of noxious (...)
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  50. Sex Selection: The Case for.Julian Savulescu - 2006 - In Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.), Bioethics: An Anthology. Blackwell. pp. 2--145.
     
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