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Shannon Winnubst [23]Shannon M. Winnubst [3]
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  1. Exceeding Hegel and Lacan: Different Fields of Pleasure Within Foucault and Irigaray.Shannon Winnubst - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):13-37.
    Anglo-American embodiments of poststructuralist and French feminism often align themselves with the texts of either Michel Foucault or Luce Irigaray. Interrogating this alleged distance between Foucault and Irigaray, I show how it reinscribes the phallic field of concepts and categories within feminist discourses. Framing both Foucault and Irigaray as exceeding Jacques Lacan's metamorphosis of G.W.F. Hegel's Concept, I suggest that engaging their styles might yield richer tools for articulating the differences within our different lives.
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  2. Vampires, Anxieties, and Dreams: Race and Sex in the Contemporary United States.Shannon Winnubst - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):1-20.
    : Drawing on several feminist and anti-racist theorists, I use the trope of the vampire to unravel how whiteness, maleness, and heterosexuality feed on the same set of disavowals—of the body, of the Other, of fluidity, of dependency itself. I then turn to Jewelle Gomez's The Gilda Stories (1991) for a counternarrative that, along with Donna Haraway's reading of vampires (1997), retools concepts of kinship and self that undergird racism, sexism, and heterosexism in contemporary U.S. culture.
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  3.  29
    What If the Law is Written in a Porno Book?Shannon Winnubst - 2006 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 10 (1):103-115.
  4.  21
    The Queer Thing About Neoliberal Pleasure.Shannon Winnubst - 2012 - Foucault Studies 14:72-97.
    Through a careful reading of Foucault’s 1979 lectures on neoliberalism alongside Volumes 1 and 2 of The History of Sexuality, I argue that scholarship on both neoliberalism and queer theory should heed Foucault’s framing of both neoliberalism and sexuality as central to biopolitics. I thus offer two correctives to these fields of scholarship: for scholarship on neoliberalism, I locate a way to address the ethical bankruptcy of neoliberalism in a manner that Marxist analyses fail to provide; for scholarship in queer (...)
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  5.  41
    Temporality in Queer Theory and Continental Philosophy.Shannon Winnubst - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):136-146.
    The connections between the fields of queer theory and continental philosophy are strange and strained: simultaneously difficult and all too easy to ferret out, there is no easy narrative for how the two fields interconnect. Both sides of the relation seem either to disavow or simply repress any relation to the other. For example, despite the impact of Foucault's History of Sexuality, Volume One on early queer theory, current work in queer of color critique challenges the politics and epistemology of (...)
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  6.  1
    The Politics of Foucault’s Genealogical Subjectivity.Shannon M. Winnubst - 1996 - Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):197-205.
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  7.  9
    Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy.Shannon Winnubst - 2008 - Philosophy 4 (1).
  8.  7
    Guest Editors' Introduction.Shannon Winnubst & Jana Sawicki - 2012 - Foucault Studies 14:4-6.
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  9.  11
    On the Historicity of the Archive: A Counter-Memory for Lynne Huffer's Mad for Foucault.Shannon Winnubst - 2011 - Philosophia 1 (2):215-225.
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  10.  29
    Is the Mirror Racist?: Interrogating the Space of Whiteness.Shannon Winnubst - 2004 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (1):25-50.
    This essay draws on a wide range of feminist, psychoanalytic and other anti-racist theorists to work out the specific mode of space as ‘contained’ and the ways it grounds dominant contemporary forms of racism i.e. the space of phallicized whiteness. Offering a close reading of Lacan’s primary models for ego-formation, the mirror stage and the inverted bouquet, I argue that psychoanalysis can help us to map contemporary power relations of racism because it enacts some of those very dynamics. Casting the (...)
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  11.  6
    Legitimate Differences: Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates (Review).Shannon Winnubst - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):195-198.
  12.  9
    The Politics of Foucault's Genealogical Subjectivity.Shannon M. Winnubst - 1996 - Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):197-205.
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  13.  3
    Symposium on Cressida Heyes's Self‐Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies: The Danger of Identifications: A Review of Self‐Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies by Cressida J. Heyes. [REVIEW]Shannon Winnubst - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):224-228.
  14.  6
    Book Review: Georgia Warnke. Legitimate Differences: Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1999. [REVIEW]Shannon Winnubst - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):195-198.
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  15.  1
    Exceeding Hegel and Lacan: Different Fields of Pleasure Within Foucault and Irigaray.Shannon Winnubst - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):13-37.
    Anglo-American embodiments of poststructuralist and French feminism often align themselves with the texts of either Michel Foucault or Luce Irigaray. Interrogating this alleged distance between Foucault and Irigaray, I show how it reinscribes the phallic field of concepts and categories within feminist discourses. Framing both Foucault and Irigaray as exceeding Jacques Lacan's metamorphosis of G.W.F. Hegel's Concept, I suggest that engaging their styles might yield richer tools for articulating the differences within our different lives.
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  16.  1
    Vampires, Anxieties, and Dreams: Race and Sex in the Contemporary United States.Shannon Winnubst - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):1-20.
    Drawing on several feminist and anti-racist theorists, I use the trope of the vampire to unravel how whiteness, maleness, and heterosexuality feed on the same set of disavowals-of the body, of the Other, of fluidity, of dependency itself. I then turn to Jewelle Gomez's The Gilda Stories for a counternarrative that, along with Donna Haraway's reading of vampires, retools concepts of kinship and self that undergird racism, sexism, and heterosexism in contemporary U.S. culture.
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  17. Legitimate Differences Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates.Shannon Winnubst - 1999
    _Legitimate Differences_ challenges the usual portrayal of current debates over thorny social issues including abortion, pornography, affirmative action, and surrogate mothering as _moral_ debates. How can it be said that our debates oppose principles of life to those of liberty, principles of liberty to those of equality, principles of equality to those of fairness, and principles of fairness to those of integrity, when we as Americans share all these principles? Debates over such issues are not, Georgia Warnke argues, moral debates (...)
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  18. Beyond Kant and Hegel: The Struggle to Think Genealogically.Shannon M. Winnubst - 1994 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
    My dissertation is a genealogical examination of the question of history and historical experience in post-Enlightenment thinking. I examine Kant, Hegel and Foucault to determine both how the Kantian-Hegelian tradition has framed the question of history for us and whether, through the genealogical method of Foucault, philosophical thinking can step outside of that structure. My central argument is against the objectification of history that is performed in Kant and then carried to its fruition in the work of Hegel. I turn (...)
     
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  19. Book Review: Georgia Warnke. Legitimate Differences: Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1999. [REVIEW]Shannon Winnubst - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (2):195-198.
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  20.  2
    Queering Freedom.Shannon Winnubst (ed.) - 2006 - Indiana University Press.
    "Radically reorienting, challenging, provocative, this book moves progressive philosophy, feminist and queer theory, critical discussions of race and racism forward. Prophetically, it calls for an interrogation of all our oppositional theory and politics, offering new and alternative visions." —bell hooks In Queering Freedom, Shannon Winnubst examines contemporary categories of difference—sexuality, race, gender, class, and nationality—and how they operate within the politics of domination. Drawing on the work of Georges Bataille, Michel Foucault, and others, Winnubst engages feminist theory, race theory, and (...)
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  21.  1
    Reading Bataille Now.Shannon Winnubst (ed.) - 2006 - Indiana UP.
    This book presents contemporary interpretations that situate Bataille in French and European intellectual traditions, and brings forward key concepts to understand the challenges posed by his important work and philosophy.
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  22.  1
    Reading Bataille Now.Shannon Winnubst (ed.) - 2007 - Indiana University Press.
    Reviled and fetishized, the work of Georges Bataille has been most often reduced to his outrageous, erotic, and libertine fiction and essays. But increasingly, readers are finding his insights into politics, economics, sexuality, and performance revealing and timely. Focusing on Bataille’s most extensive work, The Accursed Share, Shannon Winnubst and the contributors to this volume present contemporary interpretations that read Bataille in a new light. These essays situate Bataille in French and European intellectual traditions, bring forward key concepts for understanding (...)
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  23. The Danger of Identification: A Review of Self-Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies by Cressida J. Heyes. [REVIEW]Shannon Winnubst - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):224 - 228.
  24. What If the Law is Written in a Porno Book?Shannon Winnubst - 2006 - Symposium 10 (1):103-115.
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  25. What If the Law is Written in a Porno Book?: Deterritorializing Lacan, De-Oedipalizing Deleuze and Guattari.Shannon Winnubst - 2006 - Symposium 10 (1):103-115.
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  26. Way Too Cool: Selling Out Race and Ethics.Shannon Winnubst - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Life, liberty, and the pursuit of cool have informed the American ethos since at least the 1970s. Whether we strive for it in politics or fashion, cool is big business for those who can sell it across a range of markets and media. Yet the concept wasn't always a popular commodity. Cool began as a potent aesthetic of post-World War II black culture, embodying a very specific, highly charged method of resistance to white supremacy and the globalized exploitation of capital. (...)
     
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