10 found
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  1.  66
    Measurement of Corporate Social Action Discovering Taxonomy in the Kinder Lydenburg Domini Ratings Data.James E. Mattingly & Shawn L. Berman - 2006 - Business and Society 45 (1):20-46.
  2.  6
    Stakeholder Capability Enhancement as a Path to Promote Human Dignity and Cooperative Advantage.Michelle K. Westermann-Behaylo, Harry J. Van Buren & Shawn L. Berman - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (4):529-555.
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  3.  12
    Assessing the Effect of Government Surveillance on Firm Supererogation: The Case of the U.S. Automobile Industry.David E. Cavazos, Matthew Rutherford & Shawn L. Berman - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (2):156-163.
    This study builds on prior research investigating the antecedents of firm supererogation. Examining vehicle recalls in the U.S. automobile industry from 1966 to 2010 reveals that surveillance-based government enforcement programs can have widespread industry effects on a specific type of supererogatory action, firm volunteerism. Specifically, increases in government surveillance are associated with firms going beyond what is legally required of them by initiating voluntary product recalls for defects not covered in existing government regulation. Such effects are shown to be unique (...)
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  4.  10
    Corporate Social Performance and Economic Cycles.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Shawn L. Berman - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):279-294.
    Do firms respond to changes in economic growth by altering their corporate social responsibility programs? If they do respond, are their responses simply neglect of areas associated with corporate social performance or do they also cut back on positive programs such as profit sharing, public/private housing programs, or charitable contributions? In this paper, we argue that because CSP-related actions and programs tend to be discretionary, they are likely to receive less attention during tough economic times, a result of cost-cutting efforts. (...)
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  5.  24
    Introduction.Shawn L. Berman - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):597-601.
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  6. Special Issue on" The Accountable Corporation": Guest Editors' Introduction.Shawn L. Berman & Robert A. Phillips - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
     
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  7.  16
    Introduction to the Special Section on Accountability.Shawn L. Berman - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):449-452.
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  8.  1
    Stakeholder Theory: Seeing the Field Through the Forest.Michael E. Johnson-Cramer & Shawn L. Berman - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (7):1358-1375.
    Does stakeholder theory constitute an established academic field? Our answer is both “yes” and “no.” In the more than quarter-century since Freeman’s seminal contribution in 1984, this domain has acquired some of the administrative, social, and disciplinary trappings of an established field. Stakeholder research has coalesced around a unique intellectual position: that corporations must be understood within the context of their stakeholder relationships and that this understanding must grow out of the interplay between normative and social scientific insights. Yet, much (...)
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  9.  16
    Towards an Organizational View of Genuine Compassion.Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Harry J. van Buren Iii & Shawn L. Berman - 2011 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:111-122.
    Recent scholarship has suggested that compassion can occur at the organizational level. The definition of “organizational compassion” is particularly problematic because organizations have multiple reasons for engaging in actions that then have effects on various stakeholders. A number of questions regarding organizational compassion thus merit theoretical attention: Are all organizations capable of demonstrating caring and compassion? What factors enable or constrain organizational compassion? In a move toward a more complete understanding of compassion at the organizational level, a continuum of organizational (...)
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  10.  2
    Introduction: Special Issue:" Business Ethics in a Global Economy": Hosted by the Santa Clara University Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.Martin Calkins & Shawn L. Berman - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):597-601.
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