Results for 'Sheila O'Keefe-McCarthy'

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  1.  31
    Technologically-Mediated Nursing Care: the Impact on Moral Agency.Sheila O'Keefe-McCarthy - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (6):786-796.
    Technology is pervasive and overwhelming in the intensive care setting. It has the power to inform and direct the nursing care of critically ill patients. Technology changes the moral and social dynamics within nurse—patient encounters. Nurses use technology as the main reference point to interpret and evaluate clinical patient outcomes. This shapes nurses’ understanding and the kind of care provided. Technology inserts itself between patients and nurses, thus distancing nurses from patients. This situates nurses into positions of power, granting them (...)
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  2.  61
    Evidence‐based clinical guidelines: a new system to better determine true strength of recommendation.Edward Roddy, Weiya Zhang, Michael Doherty, Nigel K. Arden, Julie Barlow, Fraser Birrell, Alison Carr, Kuntal Chakravarty, John Dickson, Elaine Hay, Gillian Hosie, Michael Hurley, Kelsey M. Jordan, Christopher McCarthy, Marion McMurdo, Simon Mockett, Sheila O’Reilly, George Peat, Adrian Pendleton & Selwyn Richards - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):347-352.
  3.  11
    Adjudicating the Debate over Two Models of Nature Appreciation.Sheila Lintott - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (3):52.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Adjudicating the Debate Over Two Models of Nature AppreciationSheila Lintott (bio)It seems commonplace to point out that we aesthetically appreciate a wide variety of objects: that is, art objects are not the only good candidates for aesthetic appreciation.1 We know from experience that one can aesthetically appreciate not only Georgia O'Keefe's White Trumpet Flower, but also a white trumpet flower. Similarly, we can aesthetically appreciate both a pictorial (...)
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  4.  48
    Adjudicating the debate over two models of nature appreciation.Sheila Lintott - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (3):52-72.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Adjudicating the Debate Over Two Models of Nature AppreciationSheila Lintott (bio)It seems commonplace to point out that we aesthetically appreciate a wide variety of objects: that is, art objects are not the only good candidates for aesthetic appreciation.1 We know from experience that one can aesthetically appreciate not only Georgia O'Keefe's White Trumpet Flower, but also a white trumpet flower. Similarly, we can aesthetically appreciate both a pictorial (...)
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  5.  61
    Précis of O'Keefe & Nadel's The hippocampus as a cognitive map.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):487-494.
    Theories of spatial cognition are derived from many sources. Psychologists are concerned with determining the features of the mind which, in combination with external inputs, produce our spatialized experience. A review of philosophical and other approaches has convinced us that the brain must come equipped to impose a three-dimensional Euclidean framework on experience – our analysis suggests that object re-identification may require such a framework. We identify this absolute, nonegocentric, spatial framework with a specific neural system centered in the hippocampus.A (...)
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  6.  32
    “Editing” Genes: A Case Study About How Language Matters in Bioethics.Meaghan O'Keefe, Sarah Perrault, Jodi Halpern, Lisa Ikemoto, Mark Yarborough & U. C. North Bioethics Collaboratory for Life & Health Sciences - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):3-10.
    Metaphors used to describe new technologies mediate public understanding of the innovations. Analyzing the linguistic, rhetorical, and affective aspects of these metaphors opens the range of issues available for bioethical scrutiny and increases public accountability. This article shows how such a multidisciplinary approach can be useful by looking at a set of texts about one issue, the use of a newly developed technique for genetic modification, CRISPRcas9.
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  7.  55
    Epicurus on freedom.Tim O'Keefe - 2005 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Tim O'Keefe reconstructs the theory of freedom of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus (341-271/0 BCE). Epicurus' theory has attracted much interest, but our attempts to understand it have been hampered by reading it anachronistically as the discovery of the modern problem of free will and determinism. O'Keefe argues that the sort of freedom which Epicurus wanted to preserve is significantly different from the 'free will' which philosophers debate today, and that in its emphasis on rational (...)
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  8. Socrates' Therapeutic Use of Inconsistency in the Axiochus.Tim O'Keefe - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (4):388-407.
    The few people familiar with the pseudo-Platonic dialogue Axiochus generally have a low opinion of it. It's easy to see why: the dialogue is a mish-mash of Platonic, Epicurean and Cynic arguments against the fear of death, seemingly tossed together with no regard whatsoever for their consistency. As Furley notes, the Axiochus appears to be horribly confused. Whereas in the Apology Socrates argues that death is either annihilation or a relocation of the soul, and is a blessing either way, "the (...)
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  9. The Annicerean Cyrenaics on Friendship and Habitual Good Will.Tim O’Keefe - 2017 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 62 (3):305-318.
    Unlike mainstream Cyrenaics, the Annicereans deny that friendship is chosen only because of its usefulness. Instead, the wise person cares for her friend and endures pains for him because of her goodwill and love. Nonetheless, the Annicereans maintain that your own pleasure is the telos and that a friend’s happiness isn’t intrinsically choiceworthy. Their position appears internally inconsistent or to attribute doublethink to the wise person. But we can avoid these problems. We have good textual grounds to attribute to the (...)
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  10.  5
    Virtues abounding: St. Thomas Aquinas on the cardinal and related virtues for today.Mark O'Keefe - 2019 - Eugene, Oregon,: Cascade Books.
    Living a morally good life today is a challenge. But we become fully and authentically human precisely by the decisions we make every day—some of them relatively simple, others complex and difficult. Once a choice is made, we still must claim the moral resolve and strength of character to implement it. Virtues are precisely the sustained habits that help us maneuver life’s many choices and to become the good people that we want to be. St. Thomas Aquinas offers the classic (...)
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  11.  11
    Terrorism and Justice: Moral Argument in a Threatened World.Michael O'Keefe & C. A. J. Coady - 2002 - Melbourne Univ. Publishing.
    This is the first book to address philosophically the moral and political underpinnings of terrorism and anti-terrorism. It brings together authors with different attitudes and original perspectives on attitudes and ethical and practical justifications for terrorism.
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  12. Is consciousness the gateway to the hippocampal cognitive map? A speculative essay on the neural basis of mind.John O'Keefe - 1985 - In David A. Oakley (ed.), Brain and Mind. Methuen.
  13.  61
    Two concepts of argument.Daniel J. O'Keefe - 1992 - In William L. Benoit, Dale Hample & Pamela J. Benoit (eds.), Readings in Argumentation. Foris Publications. pp. 11--79.
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  14.  93
    Epicureanism.Tim O'Keefe - 2009 - Acumen Publishing.
    This introduction to Epicureanism offers students and general readers a clear exposition of the central tenets of Epicurean philosophy, one of the dominant schools of the Hellenistic period. Founded by Epicurus of Samos (c. 341–270 BCE), it held that for a human being the greatest good was to attain tranquility, free from fear and bodily pain, by seeking to understand the workings of the world and the limits of our desires. Tim O’Keefe provides an extended exegesis of the arguments that (...)
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  15.  46
    The cognitive map as a hippocampus.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):520-533.
  16. Cyrenaics.Tim O'Keefe - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Brief overview of the ethics of the Cyrenaics.
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  17. Ancient Theories of Freedom and Determinism.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:00-00.
    A fairly long (~15,000 word) overview of ancient theories of freedom and determinism. It covers the supposed threat of causal determinism to "free will," i.e., the sort of control we need to have in order to be rightly held responsible for our actions. But it also discusses fatalistic arguments that proceed from the Principle of Bivalence, what responsibility we have for our own characters, and god and fate. Philosophers discussed include Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, Carneades, Alexander of Aphrodisias, and Plotinus. (...)
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  18.  16
    Hippocampal function: does the working memory hypothesis work? Should we retire the cognitive map theory?John O'Keefe - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):339-343.
  19. Anaxarchus on Indifference, Happiness, and Convention.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Ancient Greek Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 680-699.
    Anaxarchus accompanied Pyrrho on Alexander the Great’s expedition to India and was known as “the Happy Man” because of his impassivity and contentment. Our sources on his philosophy are limited and largely consist of anecdotes about his interactions with Pyrrho and Alexander, but they allow us to reconstruct a distinctive ethical position. It overlaps with several disparate ethical traditions but is not merely a hodge-podge; it hangs together as a unified whole. Like Pyrrho, he asserts that things are indifferent in (...)
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  20.  36
    Epicurus.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Chiara Rover (ed.), Encyclopedia of Scepticism and Jewish Tradition. Brill.
    Encyclopedia entry on Epicurus' theology. It considers the negative side of Epicurean theology and its basis in their physics, the Epicureans’ positive view of the nature of the gods and how they use it to critique popular religion, and the psychological benefits that they claim result from having correct views about the gods.
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  21. The Normativity of Nature in Epicurean Ethics and Politics.Tim O’Keefe - 2021 - In Christof Rapp & Peter Adamson (eds.), State and Nature: Essays in Ancient Political Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 181-199.
    Appeals to nature are ubiquitous in Epicurean ethics and politics. The foundation of Epicurean ethics is its claim that pleasure is the sole intrinsic good and pain the sole intrinsic evil, and this is supposedly shown by the behavior of infants who have not yet been corrupted, "when nature's judgement is pure and whole." Central to their recommendations about how to attain pleasure is their division between types of desires: the natural and necessary ones, the natural but non-necessary ones, and (...)
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  22. Kant and the sea-horse: An essay in the neurophilosophy of space.John O'Keefe - 1993 - In Naomi Eilan, Rosaleen McCarthy & Bill Brewer (eds.), Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
  23. The Cyrenaics on Pleasure, Happiness, and Future-Concern.Tim O'Keefe - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (4):395-416.
    The Cyrenaics assert that (1) particular pleasure is the highest good, and happiness is valued not for its own sake, but only for the sake of the particular pleasures that compose it; (2) we should not forego present pleasures for the sake of obtaining greater pleasure in the future. Their anti-eudaimonism and lack of future-concern do not follow from their hedonism. So why do they assert (1) and (2)? After reviewing and criticizing the proposals put forward by Annas, Irwin and (...)
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  24.  11
    Ethical leadership begets ethical leadership: exploring situational moderators of the trickle-down effect.Damian F. O’Keefe, Glen T. Howell & Erinn C. Squires - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (8):581-600.
    Significant research attention has been devoted to understanding the ethical behavior of leaders (i.e., the moral person) and how leaders’ expectations influence their followers’ ethical behavior (...
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  25.  22
    Journeys as Shared Human Experiences.Sarah Perrault & Meaghan M. O'Keefe - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):13-15.
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  26. The Stoics on Fate and Freedom.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Meghan Griffith, Neil Levy & Kevin Timpe (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge. pp. 236-246.
    Overview of the Stoic position. Looks at the roots of their determinism in their theology, their response to the 'lazy argument' that believing that all things are fated makes action pointless, their analysis of human action and how it allows actions to be 'up to us,' their rejection of the Principle of Alternate Possibilities, their rejection of anger and other negative reactive attitudes, and their contention that submission to god's will brings true freedom.
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  27. Is Epicurean Friendship Altruistic?Tim O'Keefe - 2001 - Apeiron 34 (4):269 - 305.
    Epicurus is strongly committed to psychological and ethical egoism and hedonism. However, these commitments do not square easily with many of the claims made by Epicureans about friendship: for instance, that the wise man will sometimes die for his friend, that the wise man will love his friend as much as himself, feel exactly the same toward his friend as toward himself, and exert himself as much for his friend's pleasure as for his own, and that every friendship is worth (...)
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  28. Lucretius and the Philosophical Use of Literary Persuasion.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In Donncha O'Rourke (ed.), Approaches to Lucretius: traditions and innovations in reading De Rerum Natura. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 177-194.
    The first part of this paper looks into the question of Lucretius’ philosophical sources and whether he draws almost exclusively from Epicurus himself or also from later Epicurean texts. I argue that such debates are inconclusive and likely will remain so, even if additional Epicurean texts are discovered, and that even if we were able to ascertain Lucretius’ philosophical sources, doing so would add little to our understanding of the De Rerum Natura. The second part of the paper turns to (...)
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  29. The Epicureanism of Lucretius.Tim O'Keefe - 2023 - In Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Myrto Garani & David Konstan (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 143-158.
    What is distinctive about Lucretius’s version of Epicureanism? The answer might appear to be “nothing,” for two reasons. First, Epicureanism in general is doctrinally conservative, with followers of Epicurus claiming to follow his authority. Second, Lucretius claims to be merely transmitting the arguments of his beloved master Epicurus in a pleasing manner. I argue that these considerations do not prevent De Rerum Natura from presenting a distinct version of Epicureanism. Its arguments in physics are almost certainly drawn from Epicurus himself. (...)
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  30. The Cyrenaics vs. the Pyrrhonists on knowledge of appearances.Tim O'Keefe - 2011 - In Diego E. Machuca (ed.), New Essays on Ancient Pyrrhonism. Brill. pp. 27-40.
    In Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Sextus Empiricus takes pains to differentiate the skeptical way of life from other positions with which it is often confused, and in the course of this discussion he briefly explains how skepticism differs from Cyrenaicism. Surprisingly, Sextus does not mention an important apparent difference between the two. The Cyrenaics have a positive epistemic commitment--that we can apprehend our own feelings. Although we cannot know whether the honey is really sweet, we can know infallibly that right now (...)
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  31. The Ontological Status of Sensible Qualities for Democritus and Epicurus.Timothy O’Keefe - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):119-134.
    One striking oddity about Democritus and Epicurus is that, even though Epicurus' theory of perception is largely the same as that of Democritus, Democritus and his followers draw skeptical conclusions from this theory of perception, whereas Epicurus declares that all perceptions are true or real. I believe that the dispute between Democritus and Epicurus stems from a question over what sort of ontological status should be assigned to sensible qualities. In this paper, I address three questions: 1) Why were Democritus (...)
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  32. The Sources and Scope of Cyrenaic Scepticism.Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - In Ugo Zilioli (ed.), From the Socratics to the Socratic Schools: Classical Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology. Routledge. pp. 99-113.
    This paper focuses on two questions: (I) why do the Cyrenaics deny that we can gain knowledge concerning "external things," and (II) how wide-ranging is this denial? On the first question, I argue that the Cyrenaics are skeptical because of their contrast between the indubitable grasp we have of own affections, versus the inaccessibility of external things that cause these affections. Furthermore, this inaccessibility is due to our cognitive and perceptual limitations--it is an epistemological doctrine rooted in their psychology--and not (...)
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  33.  16
    My Body is My Manifesto!1 SlutWalk, FEMEN and Femmenist Protest.Theresa O’Keefe - 2014 - Feminist Review 107 (1):1-19.
    This paper uses an intersectional analysis to look at contemporary forms of women's popular protest in the hopes of raising questions about the explicit use of the gendered body in struggles for women's emancipation. Specifically, it explores the protests of SlutWalk and FEMEN to suggest that such body protests exemplify a problematic interface between third-wave and postfeminism. This interface or junction is most noticeable and problematic in relation to uncontested auto-sexualisation or ‘femmenism’. I argue that any subversive potential these recent (...)
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  34.  31
    Promoting Ethical and Prosocial Behavior: The Combined Effect of Ethical Leadership and Coworker Ethicality.Damian F. O’Keefe, Deanna Messervey & Erinn C. Squires - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (3):235-260.
    Ethical leadership encompasses the personal conduct of the leader and the leader’s expectations that followers behave ethically. Building on social learning and social exchange theory, we propose that ethical leadership interacts with coworker ethicality to predict personnel’s ethical intentions and organizational citizenship behavior. Using data collected from a large organizational sample, we use moderated regression analysis to test the main and interactive effects of ethical leadership and coworker ethicality on ethical intentions and OCB as it relates to conscientiousness, civic virtue, (...)
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  35. Cognitive maps, time and causality.John O'keefe - 1994 - In Objectivity, Simulation and the Unity of Consciousness: Current Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. pp. 35-45.
  36.  11
    Action and responsibility.Tim O'Keefe - 2009 - In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 142.
    Overview of the Epicurean views on why humans are rightly held responsible for their actions. Includes a discussion of the role the atomic 'swerve' plays in preserving our freedom, bivalence, our responsibility for how our character develops, and human reason and freedom.
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  37.  13
    New Metaphors for New Understandings of Genomes.Sarah Tinker Perrault & Meaghan O’Keefe - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (1):1-19.
    New techniques have made genome modification cheaper, easier, and faster than before, leading to a boom in research—both “basic” research and research applied to many species, and to germlines as well as somatic cells, with especially strong interest in biomedical uses. Given the scope and potential power of this work, it is vital that people be provided with accurate information about what is being done or proposed, and why. Such information is crucial to their making good decisions both in their (...)
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  38. Does Epicurus Need the Swerve as an Archê of Collisions?Tim O'Keefe - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (3):305-317.
    The 'swerve' is not supposed to provide a temporal 'starting point' (archê) of collisions, since Epicurus thinks that there is no temporal starting-point of collisions. Instead, the swerve is supposed to provide an explanatory archê of collisions. In positing the swerve, Epicurus is responding to Aristotle's criticisms of Democritus' theory of motion.
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  39. Spatial Representation.John O'Keefe - 1993 - Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  40. Hedonistic Theories of Well-Being in Antiquity.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being.
    Focuses on the theories of the Epicureans and Cyrenaics in light of Plato's and Aristotle's criticisms of hedonism. Closes with a brief discussion of how the Pyrrhonian skeptical conception of the telos compares to the Epicureans'.
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  41.  13
    Human Rights and Wrongs: Could Health Impact Assessment Help?Eileen O’Keefe & Alex Scott-Samuel - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):734-738.
    While the importance of civil and political rights to health advocates is widely acknowledged, economic and social rights are not yet securely on advocates’ agenda. Health impact assessment is an approach that can promote an appreciation of their importance. This paper introduces health impact assessment, gives examples of how it is being used, links its development to a focus on inequalities in health status, indicates the insufficiency of civil and political rights to protect health, and shows that the use of (...)
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  42.  12
    Human Rights and Wrongs: Could Health Impact Assessment Help?Eileen O’Keefe & Alex Scott-Samuel - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):734-738.
    While the importance of civil and political rights to health advocates is widely acknowledged, economic and social rights are not yet securely on advocates’ agenda. Health impact assessment is an approach that can promote an appreciation of their importance. This paper introduces health impact assessment, gives examples of how it is being used, links its development to a focus on inequalities in health status, indicates the insufficiency of civil and political rights to protect health, and shows that the use of (...)
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  43. Influence and Identity In Social Interaction.Barbara O'keefe - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (5):785-800.
  44. Achieving Tranquility: Epicurus on Living without Fear.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Nathan Powers & Jacob Klein (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy.
    Explores the role of eliminating fear in Epicurean ethics and physics, focusing on techniques to eliminate the fear of death and the fear of the gods.
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  45.  23
    Erratum to: Presence and digital tourism.David Benyon, Aaron Quigley, Brian O’Keefe & Giuseppe Riva - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (4):531-531.
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  46. Epicurean Advice for the Modern Consumer.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. pp. 407-416.
    Epicurus thought that the conventional values of Greek society—in particular, its celebration of luxury and wealth—often led people astray. It is by rejecting these values, reducing our desires, and leading a moderately ascetic life that we can attain happiness. But Epicurus’ message is also pertinent for those of us in modern Western culture, with an economy based on constant consumption and an advertising industry that molds us to serve that economy by enlarging our desires. This paper begins with an outline (...)
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  47. The Epicureans on happiness, wealth, and the deviant craft of property management.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Jennifer Baker & Mark White (eds.), Economics and the Virtues. Oxford University Press. pp. 37-52.
    The Epicureans advocate a moderately ascetic lifestyle on instrumental grounds, as the most effective means to securing tranquility. The virtuous person will reduce his desires to what is natural and necessary in order to avoid the trouble and anxiety caused by excessive desire. So much is clear from Epicurus' general ethics. But the later Epicurean Philodemus fills in far more detail about the attitude a wise Epicurean will take toward wealth in his treatise On Property Management. This paper explores some (...)
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  48. Epicurus' Garden: Physics and Epistemology.Tim O'Keefe - 2013 - In Frisbee Sheffield James Warren (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 455-468.
    Overview of Epicurean physics and epistemology, ending with a critical discussion of Cicero's report on Epicurean theology.
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  49. Lucretius.Tim O'Keefe - 2005 - In Patricia O'Grady (ed.), Meet the Philosophers of Ancient Greece.
    Titus Lucretius Carus was an ardent disciple of Epicurus and the author of the De Rerum Natura, one of the greatest poems in Latin. Other than his approximate dates of birth and death, we have next to no reliable information about him. Because of his family name and his apparent familiarity with Roman upper-class mores, it is thought that Lucretius was probably a member of the aristocratic clan of the Lucretii, but this is not certain. And so any insight we (...)
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  50. Kant and the sea-horse: An essay in the neurophilosophy of space.John O'Keefe - 1999 - In Naomi Eilan, Rosaleen McCarthy & Bill Brewer (eds.), Spatial Representation: Problems in Philosophy and Psychology. Clarendon Press.
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