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Sheldene Simola [7]Sheldene K. Simola [3]
  1.  68
    Ethics of Justice and Care in Corporate Crisis Management.Sheldene Simola - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (4):351 - 361.
    Despite the importance of ethics in corporate crisis management, they have received limited attention in the academic literature. This article contributes to the evolving conversation on ethics in crisis management by elucidating the ethics of "justice" and "care" and distinguishing between them. Examples of the two approaches are offered through consideration of cases in corporate crisis management, including the alleged glass contamination case faced by Gerber Products Company, and, the shooting tragedy at San Ysidro faced by McDonald''s Corporation. It is (...)
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  2.  20
    Exploring “Embodied Care” in Relation to Social Sustainability.Sheldene Simola - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):473-484.
    Although there has been a proliferation of interest in sustainable business practice, recent research has identified concerns with the relative neglect of the social versus environmental aspects of sustainability. It is argued here that due to its reliance on internally held, concrete and intrinsically motivated forms of responsiveness, as well as its ability to be authentically social versus parochial in nature, that the ethical construct of “embodied care” (Hamington, Embodied Care: Jane Addams, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Feminist Ethics, 2004 ) has (...)
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  3.  17
    Understanding Moral Courage Through a Feminist and Developmental Ethic of Care.Sheldene Simola - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):29-44.
    During the last decade, scholars of business ethics have become increasingly interested in the construct of moral courage. However, despite the importance of understanding both moral courage and the factors that might facilitate its expression, this topic has still received relatively limited study and several areas have been identified as being in need of further exploration. These include the need to investigate courage from within a full range of theoretical frameworks, including feminist ones, from within which, little is yet known (...)
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  4.  35
    Concepts of Care in Organizational Crisis Prevention.Sheldene Simola - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):341-353.
    The role of ethics in organizational crisis management has received limited but growing attention. However, the majority of research has focused on applications of ethical theories to managing crisis events after they have occurred, as opposed to the implications of ethical theories for the primary prevention of these situations. The relationship between concepts derived from a contemporary ethic of care, pp. 141–158, Gilligan, C.: 1990, ‘Preface’, in C. Gilligan, N. P. Lyons and T. J. Hanmer, pp. 6–29, Gilligan, C.: 1991, (...)
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  5.  25
    Use of a "Coping-Modeling, Problem-Solving" Program in Business Ethics Education.Sheldene K. Simola - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):383 - 401.
    During the last decade, scholars have identified a number of factors that pose significant challenges to effective business ethics education. This article offers a "coping-modeling, problem-solving" (CMPS) approach (Cunningham, 2006) as one option for addressing these concerns. A rationale supporting the use of the CMPS framework for courses on ethical decisionmaking in business is provided, following which the implementation processes for this program are described. Evaluative data collected from N = 101 undergraduate business students enrolled in a third year required (...)
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  6.  10
    Use of a “Coping-Modeling, Problem-Solving” Program in Business Ethics Education.Sheldene K. Simola - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):383-401.
    During the last decade, scholars have identified a number of factors that pose significant challenges to effective business ethics education. This article offers a “coping-modeling, problem-solving” approach as one option for addressing these concerns. A rationale supporting the use of the CMPS framework for courses on ethical decision-making in business is provided, following which the implementation processes for this program are described. Evaluative data collected from N = 101 undergraduate business students enrolled in a third year required course on ethical (...)
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  7.  24
    The Pragmatics of Care in Sustainable Global Enterprise.Sheldene K. Simola - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):131-147.
    Recent conceptualizations of sustainable global development have reflected societal concerns not only with environmental stewardship, but also with social amelioration. However, the tripartite goals of corporate profitability, environmental protection, and social responsiveness are unlikely to be achieved through conventional models of globalization. The emergent approach known as sustainable global enterprise provides a promising strategic alternate, but requires the development of “native capability” [Hart, S. L.: 2005, Capitalism at the Crossroads: The Unlimited Business Opportunities In Solving the World’s Most Difficult Problems. (...)
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  8.  43
    Transformational Leadership and Leaders' Mode of Care Reasoning.Sheldene Simola, Julian Barling & Nick Turner - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):229-237.
    Previous research on the moral foundations of transformational leadership has focused primarily on stage of justice reasoning; this study focuses on developmental mode of care reasoning. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted on data coded from interviews with a sample of Canadian public sector managers ( N = 58) and survey responses from their subordinates ( N = 119). Results indicated that managers’ developmental mode of care reasoning significantly and positively predicted subordinates’ reports of transformational (but not transactional) leadership, with significant (...)
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  9.  30
    Anti-Corporate Anger as a Form of Care-Based Moral Agency.Sheldene Simola - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S2):255 - 269.
    Conventional management strategies for anti-corporate anger involve its negative construal as an inappropriate irrationality in need of containment. An alternative account is offered in which such anger comprises a healthy and health-sustaining component of care-based moral agency directed not only toward the affiliative advancement of connection among community members, but also toward the (political) resistance to violation, injustice, and carelessness through which disconnection from responsive community relationships occurs. The role of anger in care-based moral agency is demonstrated through discussion of (...)
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  10.  9
    Fostering Collective Growth and Vitality Following Acts of Moral Courage: A General System, Relational Psychodynamic Perspective.Sheldene Simola - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):169-182.
    The purpose of this article is to explore a critical paradox related to the expression of moral courage in organizations, which is that although morally courageous acts are aimed at fostering collective growth, vitality, and virtue, their initial result is typically one of collective unease, preoccupation, or lapse, reflected in the social ostracism and censure of the courageous member and message. Therefore, this article addresses the questions of why many organizational groups suffer stagnation or decline rather than growth and vitality (...)
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