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Shelley Burtt [6]Shelley G. Burtt [1]
  1.  38
    Shelley Burtt (2007). Is Inclusion a Civic Virtue?: Cosmopolitanism, Disability, and the Liberal State. Social Theory and Practice 33 (4):557-578.
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  2. Arlene W. Saxonhouse, J. Peter Euben, Paul Cantor, Shelley Burtt, Daniel Lowenstein, Adina Schwartz, John T. Noonan, He Qinglian, Michael Johnston & Frank Anechiarico (2004). Private and Public Corruption. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The book roots corruption in the idea of a departure from conventional standards, and thus offers an account not only of its corrosiveness but also of its malleability and controversiality. In the course of a broadranging exploration, it examines various links between private and public corruption, connecting the latter with other social and political structures.
     
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  3.  1
    Shelley Burtt (2003). Comprehensive Educations and the Liberal Understanding of Autonomy. In Kevin McDonough & Walter Feinberg (eds.), Citizenship and Education in Liberal-Democratic Societies: Teaching for Cosmopolitan Values and Collective Identities. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first of the four essays in Part II of the book on liberalism and traditionalist education; all four are by authors who would like to find ways for the liberal state to honour the self-definitions of traditional cultures and to find ways of avoiding a confrontation with differences. For example, Shelley Burtt argues that the liberal state has good reason to be far more accommodating of traditional groups than liberals commonly recognize. She contends that liberal autonomy, properly (...)
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  4.  2
    Shelley Burtt (2002). What Children Really Need: Towards a Critical Theory of Family Structure. In David Archard & Colin M. Macleod (eds.), The Moral and Political Status of Children. Oxford University Press. pp. 231--252.
    The ’new familists’ argue that sociological evidence on the relation between traditional two‐parent nuclear family and positive outcomes for their children justifies public‐policy measures aimed at promoting this type of family. But the success of such families is due to the fact that many other institutional arrangements advantage this type of family. Such a family typically involves a sexist division of domestic labour. A ’critical theory of family structure’ identifies the developmental needs of children and examines the ways in which (...)
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  5.  4
    Shelley Burtt (2015). La psyché du bon citoyen : sur la psychologie de la vertu civique. Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 10 (1):83-99.
    Shelley Burtt,Jérémie Duhamel | : Quelles sont les sources psychologiques de la vertu civique dans la tradition républicaine? Cet article en identifie trois : l’éducation des passions, la manipulation des intérêts et la contrainte du devoir. L’auteure explore chacune de ces sources et conclut qu’une meilleure appréciation de ce qui les distingue est porteuse de nouvelles possibilités pour raviver la vertu républicaine dans le monde moderne. | : What are the psychological sources of civic virtue in the republican tradition? This (...)
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  6.  1
    Shelley Burtt (1990). Book Review:The Tanner Lectures on Human Values. Grethe B. Peterson. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (1):187-.
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  7.  1
    Shelley G. Burtt (2006). Virtue Transformed: Political Argument in England, 1688-1740. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a detailed study of political argument in early eighteenth-century England, a time in which the politics of virtue were vigorously pursued - and just as vigorously challenged. In tracing the emergence of a privately orientated conception of civic virtue from the period’s public discourse, this book not only challenges the received notions of the fortunes of virtue in the early modern era but provides a promising critical perspective on the question of what sort of politics of virtue (...)
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