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  1.  73
    Bridging Western Ethics and Japanese Local Ethics by Listening to Nurses' Concerns.Shigeko Izumi - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (3):275-283.
    Among Japanese nurses ethics is perceived as being distant and unrelated to their practice, although this is filled with ethical concerns and the making of ethical decisions. The reasons for this dissociation are the primacy of western values in modern Japanese health care systems and the suppression of Japanese nurses’ indigenous ethical values because of domination by western ethics. A hermeneutic study was conducted to listen to the ethical voices of Japanese nurses. Seven ethical concerns were revealed. Although some of (...)
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  2.  27
    Ethical Practice in End-of-Life Care in Japan.Shigeko Izumi - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (4):457-468.
    Nurses are obliged to provide quality nursing care that meets the ethical standards of their profession. However, clear descriptions of ethical practice are largely missing in the literature. Qualitative research using a phenomenological approach was conducted to explicate ethical nursing practice in Japanese end-of-life care settings and to discover how ethical practices unfold in clinical situations. Two paradigm cases and contrasting narratives of memorable end-of-life care from 32 Japanese nurses were used to reveal four levels of ethical practice: ethical, distressed, (...)
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