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  1.  12
    The Unforeseen Consequences of Interacting With Non‐Native Speakers.Shiri Lev‐Ari, Emily Ho & Boaz Keysar - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (4):835-849.
    Sociolinguistic research shows that listeners' expectations of speakers influence their interpretation of the speech, yet this is often ignored in cognitive models of language comprehension. Here, we focus on the case of interactions between native and non-native speakers. Previous literature shows that listeners process the language of non-native speakers in less detail, because they expect them to have lower linguistic competence. We show that processing the language of non-native speakers increases lexical competition and access in general, not only of the (...)
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  2.  5
    The Effect of Social Network Size on Hashtag Adoption on Twitter.Iris Monster & Shiri Lev‐Ari - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3149-3158.
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  3.  13
    Relative Difficulty of Understanding Foreign Accents as a Marker of Proficiency.Shiri Lev‐Ari, Marieke Heugten & Sharon Peperkamp - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):1106-1118.
    Foreign-accented speech is generally harder to understand than native-accented speech. This difficulty is reduced for non-native listeners who share their first language with the non-native speaker. It is currently unclear, however, how non-native listeners deal with foreign-accented speech produced by speakers of a different language. We show that the process of language acquisition is associated with an increase in the relative difficulty of processing foreign-accented speech. Therefore, experiencing greater relative difficulty with foreign-accented speech compared with native speech is a marker (...)
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  4.  11
    How the Size of Our Social Network Influences Our Semantic Skills.Shiri Lev‐Ari - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):2050-2064.
    People differ in the size of their social network, and thus in the properties of the linguistic input they receive. This article examines whether differences in social network size influence individuals’ linguistic skills in their native language, focusing on global comprehension of evaluative language. Study 1 exploits the natural variation in social network size and shows that individuals with larger social networks are better at understanding the valence of restaurant reviews. Study 2 manipulated social network size by randomly assigning participants (...)
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