Results for 'Showing'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Knowing-How, Showing, and Epistemic Norms.Joshua Habgood-Coote - 2018 - Synthese 195 (8):3597-3620.
    In this paper I consider the prospects for an epistemic norm which relates knowledge-how to showing in a way that parallels the knowledge norm of assertion. In the first part of the paper I show that this epistemic norm can be motivated by conversational evidence, and that it fits in with a plausible picture of the function of knowledge. In the second part of the paper I present a dilemma for this norm. If we understand showing in a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  77
    Showing by Avowing.Maura Tumulty - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (1):35-46.
    Dorit Bar-On aims to account for the distinctive security of avowals by appealing to expression. She officially commits herself only to a negative characterization of expression, contending that expressive behavior is not epistemically based in self-judgments. I argue that her account of avowals, if it relies exclusively on this negative account of expression, can't achieve the explanatory depth she claims for it. Bar-On does explore the possibility that expression is a kind of perception-enabling showing. If she endorsed this positive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Showing Certainty: An Essay on Wittgenstein's Response to Scepticism.Anne Newstead - manuscript
    Coping with everyday life limits the extent of one’s scepticism. It is practically impossible to doubt the existence of the things with which one is immediately engaged and interacting. To doubt that, say, a door exists, is to step back from merely using the door (opening it) and to reflect on it in a detached, theoretical way. It is impossible to simultaneously act and live immersed in situation S while doubting that one is in S. Sceptical doubts—such as ‘Is this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  49
    Expressing and Describing Experiences. A Case of Showing Versus Saying.Johann C. Marek - 2011 - Acta Analytica 26 (1):53-61.
    Experiences are interpreted as conscious mental occurrences that are of phenomenal character. There is already a kind of (weak) intentionality involved with this phenomenal interpretation. A stricter conception of experiences distinguishes between purely phenomenal experiences and intentional experiences in a narrow sense. Wittgenstein’s account of psychological (experiential) verbs is taken over: Usually, expressing mental states verbally is not describing them. According to this, I believe can be seen as an expression of one’s own belief, but not as an expression of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Telling, Showing and Knowing: A Unified Theory of Pedagogical Norms.Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri - 2014 - Analysis 74 (1):16-20.
    Pedagogy is a pillar of human culture and society. Telling each other information and showing each other how to do things comes naturally to us. A strong case has been made that declarative knowledge is the norm of assertion, which is our primary way of telling others information. This article presents an analogous case for the hypothesis that procedural knowledge is the norm of instructional demonstration, which is a primary way of showing others how to do things. Knowledge (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  6. Expression, Indication and Showing What’s Within.Mitchell S. Green - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (3):389-398.
    This essay offers a constructive criticism of Part I of Davis’ Meaning, Expression and Thought. After a brief exposition, in Sect. 2, of the main points of the theory that will concern us, I raise a challenge in Sect. 3 for the characterization of expression that is so central to his program. I argue first of all that a sincere expression of a thought, feeling, or mood shows it. Yet attention to this fact reveals that it does not go without (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  43
    Interjections, Language, and the "Showing/Saying" Continuum.Tim Wharton - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (1):39-91.
    Historically, interjections have been treated in two different ways: as part of language, or as non-words signifying feelings or states of mind. In this paper, I assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of two contemporary approaches that reflect the historical dichotomy, and suggest a new analysis which preserves the insights of both. Interjections have a natural and a coded element, and are better analysed as falling at various points along a continuum between `showing' and `saying'. These two notions are (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8.  5
    Interjections, Language, and the ‘Showing/Saying’ Continuum.Tim Wharton - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (1):39-91.
    Historically, interjections have been treated in two different ways: as part of language, or as non-words signifying feelings or states of mind. In this paper, I assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of two contemporary approaches that reflect the historical dichotomy, and suggest a new analysis which preserves the insights of both. Interjections have a natural and a coded element, and are better analysed as falling at various points along a continuum between ‘showing’ and ‘saying’. These two notions are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  9.  4
    The Images to Come: On Showing the Future Without Losing One’s Head.Adam Lipszyc - 2020 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (1):49-56.
    The paper discusses the possibility of a cinematic image which represents future catastrophes, while avoiding ideological entrapments and self-serving fantasies. Taking a Japanese ghost story and a brief note by Walter Benjamin as his dual starting point, the author first attempts to define the possible dangers inherent to the very idea of showing the future, the most important being the danger of the premature, cathartic discharge of the spectator’s anxiety in a sadistic/voyeuristic show. After discussion of the mechanisms of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  2
    Showing in Wittgenstein’s Ab-Notation.Gregory Landini - 2020 - In Shyam Wuppuluri & Newton da Costa (eds.), Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein's Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 193-226.
    Perhaps it is not overly pedantic to say that one will find Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus very difficult even if one first understands Russell’s philosophical logic. But the question remains as to whether the work is intended in alliance with Russell’s research program for a scientific method in philosophy or splits from that program. This paper endeavors to answer the question by revealing new evidence that Wittgenstein held his Doctrine of Showing in 1913 and that it was a demand he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  32
    Showing, the Medium Voice, and the Unity of the Tractatus.Jean-Philippe Narboux - 2014 - Philosophical Topics 42 (2):201-262.
    In this essay, I take up James Conant and Cora Diamond’s suggestion that “to take the difference between saying and showing deeply enough is not to give up on showing but to give up on picturing it as a ‘what’ ”. I try to establish that the Tractatus’s talk of “showing” is more coherent than is usually appreciated, that it is indeed a key to the internal unity of the book, and that it positively helps us to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  47
    Wittgenstein on Showing What Cannot Be Said.Andrew Lugg - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):246-257.
    The distinction between saying and showing in Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is not self-refuting, unbelievable or nonsensical. It makes good sense given Wittgenstein's equation of saying with communicable information and showing with necessarily true thought. The key to understanding his thinking is his claim in the Preface that unassailable and definitive truths are expressed in the book, and the subsidiary assumption that asserting empty truths is nonsensical. His conception of pictures, propositions, logic, mathematics, mathematical physics, mysticism, the inexpressible and solipsism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Showing, Analysis and the Truth-Functionality of Logical Necessity in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2004 - Synthese 139 (1):81 - 105.
    This paper aims to explain how the Tractatus attempts to unify logic by deriving the truth-functionality of logical necessity from the thesis that a proposition shows its sense. I first interpret the Tractarian notion of showing as the displaying of what is intrinsic to an expression (or a symbol). Then I argue that, according to the Tractatus, the thesis that a proposition shows its sense implies the determinacy of sense, the possibility of the complete elimination of non-primitive symbols, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. Showing and Saying. An Aesthetic Difference.Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte - 2013 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):139-150.
    Wittgenstein’s distinction between saying and showing and the associated thesis, what can be shown cannot be said, were crucial to his first philosophy, persisted throughout the evolution of his whole thought and played a key role in his views on aesthetics. The objective of art is access to the mystical, forcing us to become aware of the uniqueness of our own experience and life. When art is good is a perfect expression and the work of art becomes like a (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  19
    Between Self-Showing and Withdrawal: Heidegger’s Question of Being Reconsidered.Guang Yang - 2018 - Research in Phenomenology 48 (2):233-243.
    _ Source: _Volume 48, Issue 2, pp 233 - 243 This article focuses on two Platonic concepts, δύναµις and χώρα, and Heidegger’s interpretation of them in his lecture courses on Greek philosophy. I try to demonstrate that these two concepts offer us insights into the dynamic movement of Being between self-showing and withdrawal. The aim of the article is to show that Being, as one of the greatest kinds in the _Sophist_, and the elusive χώρα in the _Timaeus_ can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  8
    Showing Movement in Children's Pictures: A Study of the Effectiveness of Some Non‐Mimetic Representations of Motion.Douglas P. Newton - 1984 - Educational Studies 10 (3):255-261.
    (1984). Showing Movement in Children's Pictures: a study of the effectiveness of some non‐mimetic representations of motion. Educational Studies: Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 255-261.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  33
    Wittgenstein's Concept of Showing.David Pears - 1992 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 42 (1):91-105.
    Starting from an analysis of Wittgenstein's reasons for placing all true-seeming sentences about the relation between language and the world in the class of utterances that lack a truth-value and can only communicate in the privileged way, the doctrine of showing is investigated in Wittgenstein's later writings. In contrast to the view that the concept of showing simply disappeared with the abandonment of the picture theory of the sentence it is argued that much of his erarly doctrine of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  25
    Dominic Gregory, Showing, Sensing, and Seeming. Reviewed by Nick Wiltsher. [REVIEW]Nick Wiltsher - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (3):143-145.
    Review of Dominic Gregory's "Showing, Sensing, and Seeming".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  25
    A 'Plausible' Showing After 'Bell Atlantic Corp. V. Twombly'.Charles B. Campbell - manuscript
    The United States Supreme Court's decision in Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly is creating quite a stir. Suddenly gone is the famous loosey-goosey rule of Conley v. Gibson that a complaint should not be dismissed for failure to state a claim unless it appears beyond doubt that the plaintiff can prove no set of facts in support of his claim which would entitle him to relief.Now a complaint must provide enough facts to state a claim to relief that is plausible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  38
    Language as Saying and Showing.Michael Gelven - 1983 - Journal of Value Inquiry 17 (2):151-163.
    A distinction is made between language that states what is the case and language that reveals meaning. The latter, Is not emotive but cognitive. Truth must be seen as the revelation of meaning, And falseness conceals meaning. Since there is no referential entity to such language, It must be grounded rather in modes of being. Thus, Language as showing reveals the truth, Conceived as an understanding of what it means to exist.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  23
    The Gravity of Steering, the Grace of Gliding and the Primordiality of Presencing Place: Reflections on Truthfulness, Worlding, Seeing, Saying and Showing in Practical Reasoning and Law. [REVIEW]Oren Ben-Dor - 2013 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):341-390.
    This article reflects on the received view of the rupture which constitutes the beginning of a critical, ethical, political and legal opening, the understanding of which inhabits the cry of, and response to, injustice. It takes the very critique that feeds into, and is distorted by, practical reasoning, as its point of departure. Grasping this rupture as the complementary relation between deconstruction and radical alterity, would entail unreflectively accepting a certain kind of truthfulness—truthfulness as [in]correctness, manifesting in a relationship that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  7
    Wittgenstein's Concept of Showing.David Pears - 1992 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 42 (1):91-105.
    Starting from an analysis of Wittgenstein's reasons for placing all true-seeming sentences about the relation between language and the world in the class of utterances that lack a truth-value and can only communicate in the privileged way, the doctrine of showing is investigated in Wittgenstein's later writings. In contrast to the view that the concept of showing simply disappeared with the abandonment of the picture theory of the sentence it is argued that much of his erarly doctrine of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Showing in Wittgenstein’s Ab-Notation.Gregory Landini - 2020 - In A. C. Grayling, Shyam Wuppuluri, Christopher Norris, Nikolay Milkov, Oskari Kuusela, Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, Beth Savickey, Jonathan Beale, Duncan Pritchard, Annalisa Coliva, Jakub Mácha, David R. Cerbone, Paul Horwich, Michael Nedo, Gregory Landini, Pascal Zambito, Yoshihiro Maruyama, Chon Tejedor, Susan G. Sterrett, Carlo Penco, Susan Edwards-Mckie, Lars Hertzberg, Edward Witherspoon, Michel ter Hark, Paul F. Snowdon, Rupert Read, Nana Last, Ilse Somavilla & Freeman Dyson (eds.), Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein’s Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 193-226.
    Perhaps it is not overly pedantic to say that one will find Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus very difficult even if one first understands Russell’s philosophical logic. But the question remains as to whether the work is intended in alliance with Russell’s research program for a scientific method in philosophy or splits from that program. This paper endeavors to answer the question by revealing new evidence that Wittgenstein held his Doctrine of Showing in 1913 and that it was a demand he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Showing, Telling and Seeing.Elisabeth Camp - 2007 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3 (1):1-24.
    Theorists often associate certain “poetic” qualities with metaphor – most especially, producing an open-ended, holistic perspective which is evocative, imagistic and affectively-laden. I argue that, on the one hand, non-cognitivists are wrong to claim that metaphors only produce such perspectives: like ordinary literal speech, they also serve to undertake claims and other speech acts with propositional content. On the other hand, contextualists are wrong to assimilate metaphor to literal loose talk: metaphors depend on using one thing as a perspective for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  25.  41
    Admiration and Adoration: Their Different Ways of Showing and Shaping Who We Are.Ines Schindler, Veronika Zink, Johannes Windrich & Winfried Menninghaus - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (1):85-118.
  26.  31
    Showing Our Seams: A Reply to Eric Funkhouser.Neil Levy - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (7):991-1006.
    ABSTRACTIn a recent paper published in this journal, Eric Funkhouser argues that some of our beliefs have the primary function of signaling to others, rather than allowing us to navigate the world. Funkhouser’s case is persuasive. However, his account of beliefs as signals is underinclusive, omitting both beliefs that are signals to the self and less than full-fledged beliefs as signals. The latter set of beliefs, moreover, has a better claim to being considered as constituting a psychological kind in its (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Or at Least Straighter. The Logic of Affect's Central Project is Showing How Our Current Thinking About Fears, Levities, and Rancors is Continuous with That of German Idealists. The Book is Thereby, Basically, a Work in the History.John Hughlings Jackson & Theodor Meynert - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (3):470-473.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  30
    Experimental Evidence Showing That Physician Guidance Promotes Perceptions of Physician Empathy.Daniel Russell Hans, Priyanka Dubé & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):135-139.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  61
    Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents.Dominic Gregory - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Certain representations are bound in special ways to our sensory capacities. What do these representations have in common, and what makes them different from representations of other kinds? Dominic Gregory employs novel ideas on perceptual states and sensory perspectives to explain the special nature of distinctively sensory representations.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  30. Showing How to Derive Knowing How. [REVIEW]Mark Schroeder - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):746-753.
    Jason Stanley's Know How aims to offer an attractive intellectualist analysis of knowledge how that is compositionally predicted by the best available treatments of sentences like 'Emile knows how to make his dad smile.' This paper explores one significant way in which Stanley's compositional treatment fails to generate his preferred account, and advocates a minimal solution.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. The Spectacular Showing: Houdini and the Wonder of Ethnomethodology.Eric Laurier - 2004 - Human Studies 27 (4):377-399.
    This essay is about Houdini’s escapes and ethnomethodology’s studies.1 By accomplishing what appears to be impossible, Houdini leaves his audience considering not only how did he manage to do that, but also just what is it that we consider to be possible. Magicians and escapologists warn us off an interest in the mechanics of their tricks that might spoil the thrill of what they dramatically present to us: a sense of the limits to whatwe can apprehend as an audience. While (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Showing the Time.J. Biro - 2013 - Analysis 73 (1):57-62.
    The so–called truthmaker solution to the problem Gettier is thought to have posed for the analysis of knowledge as justified true belief is to add a fourth condition, requiring that one’s evidence for one’s belief be the state of affairs that makes the belief true. Adrian Heathcote argues that the reason why one lacks knowledge in Russell’s case of the stopped clock is that, as in the classic Gettier–style cases, this condition is not satisfied. I argue that the proposed solution (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33. Saying and Showing and the Continuity of Wittgenstein’s Thought.Marie McGinn - 2001 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 9 (1):24-36.
  34.  9
    Only Three Fingers Write, but the Whole Brain Works†: A High-Density EEG Study Showing Advantages of Drawing Over Typing for Learning.Audrey L. H. van der Meer & F. R. van der Weel - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  76
    Expressing as ‘Showing What's Within’: On Mitchell Green's, Self‐Expression OUP 2007.Dorit Bar‐on - 2010 - Philosophical Books 51 (4):212-227.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36.  94
    Seeing and Showing.Arthur C. Danto - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):1-9.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37. Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents. [REVIEW]Margot Strohminger - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (1):101-103.
  38.  42
    Showing That You Care: The Evolution of Health Altruism.Robin Hanson - unknown
    Human behavior regarding medicine seems strange; assumptions and models that seem workable in other areas seem less so in medicine. Perhaps we need to rethink the basics. Toward this end, I have collected many puzzling stylized facts about behavior regarding medicine, and have sought a small number of simple assumptions which might together account for as many puzzles as possible.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  12
    Tongue Showing: A Facial Display of Humans and Other Primate Species.W. John Smith, Julia Chase & Anna Katz Lieblich - 1974 - Semiotica 11 (3).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  40. Qualia! (Now Showing at a Theater Near You).Eric Lormand - 1994 - Philosophical Topics 22 (1/2):127-156.
    Despite such widespread acclaim, there are some influential theater critics who have panned Qualia!
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  41. Moorean Absurdity and Showing What's Within.Mitchell Green - 2007 - In Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (eds.), Moore's Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality, and the First Person. Oxford University Press.
    Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the University of Virginia and at Texas A&M University. I thank audiences at both institutions for their insightful comments. Special thanks to John Williams for his illuminating comments on an earlier draft. Research for this paper was supported in part by a Summer Grant from the Vice Provost for Research and Public Service at the University of Virginia. That support is here gratefully acknowledged.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  8
    Ways of Showing Respect for Life.Ruth Chadwick - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (7):494-494.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  22
    Pardon, Your Dualism is Showing.Charles C. Wood - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):557-558.
  44.  2
    Robots Showing Emotions.Julian M. Angel-Fernandez & Andrea Bonarini - 2016 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 17 (3):408-437.
    Robots should be able to represent emotional states to interact with people as social agents. There are cases where robots cannot have bio-inspired bodies, for instance because the task to be performed requires a special shape, as in the case of home cleaners, package carriers, and many others. In these cases, emotional states have to be represented by exploiting movements of the body. In this paper, we present a set of case studies aimed at identifying specific values to convey emotion (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Hegel on Saying and Showing.Susan Hahn - 1994 - Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (2):151-168.
    Hegel's most interesting and controversial claims about nonconceptual knowledge arise in contexts of value. This paper examines the relation between nonconceptual and conceptual knowledge in Hegel's Phenomenology, specifically in connection with early Greek aesthetics. I take up Hegel's claim that the ancient Greeks expressed in their myths, religious narratives, sculpture, and artistic materials certain high powered philosophical truths which they shouldn't express in words. I raise a paradox about his claims and show how his claims about ineffable knowledge clash with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  15
    A Philosophy of Physical Education Oriented Toward the Game as an Object. Showing the Inexhaustible Reality of Games Through Bernard Suits’ Theory.Wenceslao Garcia-Puchades & Oscar Chiva-Bartoll - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (2):192-205.
    Although a large number of theories justify the presence of games in school, all of them converge in two of the educational functions described by Biesta, socialization and qualification. In contra...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  44
    Telling, Showing, Showing Off.Mieke Bal - 1992 - Critical Inquiry 18 (3):556-594.
    The American Museum of Natural History is monumental not only in its architecture and design but also in its size, scope, and content. This monumental quality suggests in and of itself the primary meaning of the museum inherited from its history: comprehensive collecting as a form of domination.8 In this respect museums belong to an era of scientific and colonial ambition, from the Renaissance through the early twentieth century, with its climactic moment in the second half of the nineteenth century. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  31
    Why Peter van Inwagen Does Not Help in Showing the Logical Possibility of the Trinity.Vlastimil Vohánka - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (2):196-214.
    I conceive the Trinity doctrine as the proposition that there are three persons each of whom is God but just one being which is God. In two papers by Peter van Inwagen I distinguish three potential candidates for a reason that the Trinity doctrine is logically possible. First, a particular conjunction entailing the Trinity doctrine is formally consistent in relative identity logic. Second, the conjunction is formally consistent in the standard logic. Third, the conjunction shares a form in relative identity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  75
    Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents, by Dominic Gregory.Michael Rescorla - 2015 - Mind 124 (495):911-914.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Book Review : The New Republic: A Commentary on Bk. 1 of More's Utopia Showing its Relation to Plato's Republic, by Colin Starnes. Waterloo, Wilfred Laurier University Press, 1990. Xiv + 122 Pp. CAN $24.95. [REVIEW]J. L. O'Donovan - 1991 - Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (2):87-91.
1 — 50 / 1000