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  1.  1
    Excavating the Origins of the Learning Pyramid Myths.Kåre Letrud & Sigbjørn Hernes - 2018 - Cogent 1 (5).
    The family of cognitive models sometimes referred to as the “Learning Pyramid” enjoys a considerable level of authority within several areas of educational studies, despite that nobody knows how they originated or whether they were supported by any empirical evidence. This article investigates the early history of these models. Through comprehensive searches in digital libraries, we have found that versions of the Learning Pyramids have been part of educational debates and practices for more than 160 years. These findings demonstrate that (...)
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  2.  6
    Affirmative Citation Bias in Scientific Myth Debunking: A Three-in-One Case Study.Kåre Letrud & Sigbjørn Hernes - 2019 - PLoS ONE 9 (14).
    Several uncorroborated, false, or misinterpreted conceptions have for years been widely distributed in academic publications, thus becoming scientific myths. How can such misconceptions persist and proliferate within the inimical environment of academic criticism? Examining 613 articles we demonstrate that the reception of three myth-exposing publications is skewed by an ‘affirmative citation bias’: The vast majority of articles citing the critical article will affirm the idea criticized. 468 affirmed the myth, 105 were neutral, while 40 took a negative stance. Once misconceptions (...)
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    The Diffusion of the Learning Pyramid Myths in Academia: An Exploratory Study.Kåre Letrud & Sigbjørn Hernes - 2016 - Journal of Curriculum Studies 48 (3):291-302.
    This article examines the diffusion and present day status of a family of unsubstantiated learning-retention myths, some of which are referred to as ‘the learning pyramid’. We demonstrate through an extensive search in academic journals and field-specific encyclopaedias that these myths are indeed widely publicised in academia and that they have gained a considerable level of authority. We also argue that the academic publishing of these myths is potentially harmful to both professional as well as political deliberations on educational issues, (...)
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