Results for 'Signs'

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  1. Peirce's Theory of Signs.Albert Atkin - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Peirce's Sign Theory, or Semiotic, is an account of signification, representation, reference and meaning. Although sign theories have a long history, Peirce's accounts are distinctive and innovative for their breadth and complexity, and for capturing the importance of interpretation to signification. For Peirce, developing a thoroughgoing theory of signs was a central philosophical and intellectual preoccupation. The importance of semiotic for Peirce is wide ranging. As he himself said, “[…] it has never been in my power to study anything,—mathematics, (...)
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  2.  17
    Consciousness and the Philosophy of Signs: How Peircean Semiotics Combines Phenomenal Qualia and Practical Effects.Marc Champagne - 2018 - Cham: Springer.
    It is often thought that consciousness has a qualitative dimension that cannot be tracked by science. Recently, however, some philosophers have argued that this worry stems not from an elusive feature of the mind, but from the special nature of the concepts used to describe conscious states. Marc Champagne draws on the neglected branch of philosophy of signs or semiotics to develop a new take on this strategy. The term “semiotics” was introduced by John Locke in the modern period (...)
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  3. Images, Diagrams, and Metaphors: Hypoicons in the Context of Peirce's Sixty-Six-Fold Classification of Signs.Priscila Farias & João Queiroz - 2006 - Semiotica 2006 (162):287-307.
    In his 1903 Syllabus, Charles S. Peirce makes a distinction between icons and iconic signs, or hypoicons, and briefly introduces a division of the latter into images, diagrams, and metaphors. Peirce scholars have tried to make better sense of those concepts by understanding iconic signs in the context of the ten classes of signs described in the same Syllabus. We will argue, however, that the three kinds of hypoicons can better be understood in the context of Peirce's (...)
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  4. Writings on the General Theory of Signs.Charles W. Morris - 1971 - The Hague: Mouton.
    Foundations of the theory of signs.--Signs, language, and behavior.--Five semiotical studies.
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  5.  99
    Models as Signs: Extending Kralemann and Lattman’s Proposal on Modeling Models Within Peirce’s Theory of Signs.Sergio A. Gallegos - forthcoming - Synthese.
    In recent decades, philosophers of science have devoted considerable efforts to understand what models represent. One popular position is that models represent fictional situations. Another position states that, though models often involve fictional elements, they represent real objects or scenarios. Though these two positions may seem to be incompatible, I believe it is possible to reconcile them. Using a threefold distinction between different signs proposed by Peirce, I develop an argument based on a proposal recently made by Kralemann and (...)
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  6.  94
    10cubes and 3N3: Using Interactive Diagrams to Investigate Charles Peirces Classifications of Signs.Priscila Farias & João Queiroz - 2004 - Semiotica 2004 (151):41-63.
    This article presents some results of a research on computational strategies for the visualization of sign classification structures and sign processes. The focus of this research is the various classifications of signs described by Peirce. Two models are presented. One of them concerns specifically the 10-fold classification as described in the 1903 Syllabus (MS 540, EP 2: 289–299), while the other deals with the deep structure of Peirce’s various trichotomic classifications. The first is 10cubes, an interactive 3-D model of (...)
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  7.  22
    The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team’s Work.Riin Magnus - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (3):447-463.
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of intrateam (...)
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  8.  33
    Natural Signs and the Origin of Language.Anton Sukhoverkhov - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (2):153-159.
    This article considers natural signs and their role in the origin of language. Natural signs, sometimes called primary signs, are connected with their signified by causal relationships, concomitance, or likeliness. And their acquisition is directed by both objective reality and past experience (memory). The discovery and use of natural signs is a required prerequisite of existence for any living systems because they are indispensable to movement, the search for food, regulation, communication, and many other information-related activities. (...)
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  9.  10
    Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs.James Fetzer - 2001 - The Commens Encyclopedia: The Digital Encyclopedia of Peirce Studies.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cogniton is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from ther interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such–apart from human users–are not only (...)
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  10.  55
    The (Gendered) Construction of Diagnosis Interpretation of Medical Signs in Women Patients.Kirsti Malterud - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (3):275-286.
    Medicine maintains a distinction between the medical symptom -- the patient''ssubjective experience and expression, and the privileged medical sign -- the objective findings observable by the doctor. Although the distinction is not consistently applied, it becomes clearly visible in the undefined, medically unexplained disorders of women patients. Potential impacts of genderized interaction on the interpretation of medical signs are addressed by re-reading the diagnostic process as a matter of social construction, where diagnosis results from human interpretation within a sociopolitical (...)
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  11.  46
    Ontology Based Annotation of Contextualized Vital Signs.Goldfain Albert, Xu Min, Bona Jonathan & Barry Smith - 2013 - In Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (ICBO). Montreal: pp. 28-33.
    Representing the kinetic state of a patient (posture, motion, and activity) during vital sign measurement is an important part of continuous monitoring applications, especially remote monitoring applications. In contextualized vital sign representation, the measurement result is presented in conjunction with salient measurement context metadata. We present an automated annotation system for vital sign measurements that uses ontologies from the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry (OBO Foundry) to represent the patient’s kinetic state at the time of measurement. The annotation system is applied (...)
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  12.  13
    Brentano and the Theory of Signs.Carlo Ierna - 2012 - Paradigmi 2.
    In this article the author will discuss Franz Brentano’s theory of intentionality and the ontological status of the intentional object specifically with respect to symbolic presentations. The role and function of intentionality are compared to the process of semeiosis. Several interesting parallels can be found between fundamental problems in the interpretation of the Brentanian notion of intentionality and issues in semiotics. In particular, the author focuses on the theory of Charles W. Morris and attempts to apply core notions of his (...)
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  13.  6
    On Peirce's Diagrammatic Models for ten Classes of Signs.Priscila Lena Farias & João Queiroz - 2014 - Semiotica 2014 (202).
    The classifications of signs are among the most important topics of Peirce's theory of signs. The 10 classes of signs were developed from 1903 and represent an important refinement of the fundamental division of signs into icons, indexes, and symbols. In this paper we present two diagrammatic models for 10 classes, proposed by Peirce, and an interpretation of the reasoning behind their development, based on the analysis of preparatory versions of these models.
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  14. Speech and Phenomena. And Other Essays on Husserl’s Theory of Signs.Jacques Derrida - 1973 - Evanston: Northwestern University Press.
  15.  12
    Latency of Instrumental Responses as a Function of Compatibility with the Meaning of Eliciting Verbal Signs.Andrew K. Solarz - 1960 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (4):239.
  16.  28
    Peirce's Theory of Signs as Foundation for Pragmatism.John Joseph Fitzgerald - 1966 - The Hague: Mouton.
  17.  7
    Elements of Peircean Phenomenology: From Categories to Signs by Way of Grounds.Göran Sonesson - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (228):259-285.
    Journal Name: Semiotica Issue: Ahead of print.
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  18.  16
    Signs and the Process of Interpretation: Sign as an Object and as a Process.Adalira Sáenz-Ludlow - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (3):205-223.
  19.  5
    La sémiotique juridique verbale et nonverbale comme stratégie de communication du droit: Signs, symbols, and meanings in law.Anne Wagner - 2017 - Semiotica 2017 (216):1-18.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2017 Heft: 216 Seiten: 1-18.
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  20.  10
    Complex Signs in Diagnostic Free Association.C. L. Hull & L. S. Lugoff - 1921 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (2):111.
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  21.  8
    Some Relationships Between Electrical Signs of Central and Peripheral Activity: I. During Rest.J. M. Hadley - 1940 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):640.
  22.  6
    Some Relationships Between Electrical Signs of Central and Peripheral Activity: II. During 'Mental Work.'.J. M. Hadley - 1941 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (1):53.
  23.  4
    Signs of Probability: A Semiotic Perspective on the Heisenberg Principle.Baranna Baker - 2015 - Semiotica 2015 (205):87-93.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2015 Heft: 205 Seiten: 87-93.
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  24.  5
    Supplementary Report: Effectiveness of Food and Nonfood Signs in Reversal Learning by Monkeys.J. M. Warren - 1960 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (4):263-264.
  25. Speech and Phenomena and Other Essays on Husserl's Theory of Signs. Translated, with an Introd., by David B. Allison. Pref. By Newton Garver. --. [REVIEW]Jacques Derrida - 1973 - Northwestern University Press.
     
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  26.  48
    Peirce's Theory of Signs.T. L. Short - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, T. L. Short corrects widespread misconceptions of Peirce's theory of signs and demonstrates its relevance to contemporary analytic philosophy of language, mind and science. Peirce's theory of mind, naturalistic but nonreductive, bears on debates of Fodor and Millikan, among others. His theory of inquiry avoids foundationalism and subjectivism, while his account of reference anticipated views of Kripke and Putnam. Peirce's realism falls between 'internal' and 'metaphysical' realism and is more satisfactory than either. His pragmatism is not (...)
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  27. A World of Signs: Baroque Pansemioticism, the Polyhistor and the Early Modern Wunderkammer.Jan C. Westerhoff - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (4):633-650.
    This paper is an attempt to argue that there existed a very prominent view of signs and signification in late sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe which can help us to understand several puzzling aspects of baroque culture. This view, called here "pansemioticism," constituted a fundamental part of the baroque conception of the world. After sketching the content and importance of pansemioticism, I will show how it can help us to understand the (from a modern perspective) rather puzzling concept of the (...)
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  28. Natural Signs and Knowledge of God: A New Look at Theistic Arguments.C. Stephen Evans - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Is there such a thing as natural knowledge of God? C. Stephen Evans presents the case for understanding theistic arguments as expressions of natural signs in order to gain a new perspective both on their strengths and weaknesses. Three classical, much-discussed theistic arguments - cosmological, teleological, and moral - are examined for the natural signs they embody. At the heart of this book lie several relatively simple ideas. One is that if there is a God of the kind (...)
     
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  29. Six Signs of Scientism.Susan Haack - 2012 - Logos and Episteme 3 (1):75-95.
    As the English word “scientism” is currently used, it is a trivial verbal truth that scientism—an inappropriately deferential attitude to science—should be avoided. But it is a substantial question when, and why, deference to the sciences is inappropriate or exaggerated. This paper tries to answer that question by articulating “six signs of scientism”: the honorific use of “science” and its cognates; using scientific trappings purely decoratively; preoccupation with demarcation; preoccupation with “scientific method”; looking to the sciences for answers beyond (...)
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  30. On Reading Signs.Ruth G. Millikan - manuscript
    On Reading Signs; Some Differences between Us and The Others If there are certain kinds of signs that an animal cannot learn to interpret, that might be for any of a number of reasons. It might be, first, because the animal cannot discriminate the signs from one another. For example, although human babies learn to discriminate human speech sounds according to the phonological structures of their native languages very easily, it may be that few if any other (...)
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  31. Diagrammatic Teaching: The Role of Iconic Signs in Meaningful Pedagogy.Catherine Legg - 2017 - In Inna Semetsky (ed.), Edusemiotics: A Handbook. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 29-45.
    Charles S. Peirce’s semiotics uniquely divides signs into: i) symbols, which pick out their objects by arbitrary convention or habit, ii) indices, which pick out their objects by unmediated ‘pointing’, and iii) icons, which pick out their objects by resembling them (as Peirce put it: an icon’s parts are related in the same way that the objects represented by those parts are themselves related). Thus representing structure is one of the icon’s greatest strengths. It is argued that the implications (...)
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  32.  20
    Surrogates and Empty Intentions: Husserl’s “On the Logic of Signs” as the Blueprint for His First Logical Investigation.Thomas Byrne - 2017 - Husserl Studies 33 (3):211-227.
    This paper accomplishes two tasks. First, I examine in detail Edmund Husserl’s earliest philosophy of surrogates, as it is found in his 1890 “On the Logic of Signs ”. I analyze his psychological and logical investigations of surrogates, where the former is concerned with explaining how these signs function and the latter with how they do so reliably. His differentiation of surrogates on the basis of their genetic origins and degrees of necessity is discussed. Second, the historical importance (...)
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  33.  17
    Division of Signs.Charles S. Peirce - 2015 - Sign Systems Studies 43 (4):651.
    Hereby we publish five excerpts from Charles S. Peirce’s manuscripts – one from the Prescott Book and four from the Logic Notebook. These concern the problems of classification of signs.
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  34. The Seven Signs of Ethical Collapse: How to Spot Moral Meltdowns in Companies-- Before It's Too Late.Marianne Jennings - 2006 - St. Martin's Press.
    Do you want to make sure you · Don’t invest your money in the next Enron? · Don’t go to work for the next WorldCom right before the crash? · Identify and solve problems in your organization before they send it crashing to the ground? Marianne Jennings has spent a lifetime studying business ethics---and ethical failures. In demand nationwide as a speaker and analyst on business ethics, she takes her decades of findings and shows us in The Seven Signs (...)
     
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  35.  66
    Inference From Signs: Ancient Debates About the Nature of Evidence.James Allen - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Original and penetrating, this book investigates of the notion of inference from signs, which played a central role in ancient philosophical and scientific method. It examines an important chapter in ancient epistemology: the debates about the nature of evidence and of the inferences based on it--or signs and sign-inferences as they were called in antiquity. As the first comprehensive treatment of this topic, it fills an important gap in the histories of science and philosophy.
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  36. Tracking the Domains of Conventional Signs.Chapter ten - unknown
    I want now to argue that just as no intentional representations of retinal images intervene between physical objects and the seeing of those objects, no representations of speaker intentions in speaking need intervene between world affairs spoken of by speakers and hearers' understandings of those words.1 When conventional signs are true or satisfied and when this has come about in the normal way, conventional signs are locally recurrent natural signs. True, tokens of the same conventional sign may (...)
     
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  37.  56
    Tell-Tale Signs of Pseudoskepticism (Bogus Skepticism).Marcoen J. T. F. Cabbolet - manuscript
    Pseudoskepticism, which typically is portraying someone's work as despicable with scientifically unsound polemics, is a modern day threat to the traditional standard of discussion in science and popular science. This essay gives seven tell-tale signs by which pseudoskepticism can be recognized.
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  38.  72
    The Symbol and the Theory of the Life-World: “The Transcendences of the Life-World and Their Overcoming by Signs and Symbols”.Jochen Dreher - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (2):141-163.
    This essay presents a phenomenological analysis of the functioning of symbols as elements of the life-world with the purpose of demonstrating the interrelationship of individual and society. On the basis of Alfred Schutz''s theory of the life-world, signs and symbols are viewed as mechanisms by means of which the individual can overcome the transcendences posed by time, space, the world of the Other, and multiple realities which confront him or her. Accordingly, the individual''s life-world divides itself into the dimensions (...)
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  39.  22
    The Dawn of Husserl’s Pure Logical Grammar: Husserl’s Study of Inauthentic Judgments From “On The Logic Of Signs” as the Germ of the “Fourth Logical Investigation”.Thomas Byrne - 2017 - Studia Phaenomenologica 17:285-308.
    This paper accomplishes two goals. First, I elucidate Edmund Husserl’s theory of inauthentic judgments from his 1890 “On the Logic of Signs.” It will be shown how inauthentic judgments are distinct from other signitive experiences, in such a manner that when Husserl seeks to account for them, he is forced to revise the general structure of his philosophy of meaning and in doing so, is also able to realize novel insights concerning the nature of signification. Second, these conclusions are (...)
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  40. On Reading Signs; Some Differences Between Us and The Others.Ruth Garrett Millikan - unknown
    On Reading Signs; Some Differences between Us and The Others If there are certain kinds of signs that an animal cannot learn to interpret, that might be for any of a number of reasons. It might be, first, because the animal cannot discriminate the signs from one another. For example, although human babies learn to discriminate human speech sounds according to the phonological structures of their native languages very easily, it may be that few if any other (...)
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  41. Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs[REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (3):345-364.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cognition is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition as computation across representations is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from their interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such — (...)
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  42. The Seven Warning Signs of Voodoo Science.Robert L. Park - 2003 - Think 1 (3):33-42.
    The world is increasingly full of junk science. Pseudo-scientific claims are rife, and the public is regularly misled. Here, the physicist Robert Park points out seven warning signs of pseudo-science. Does parapsychology exhibit any of these warning signs? Read on to find out….
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  43. Peirce's Final Account of Signs and the Philosophy of Language.Albert Atkin - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (1):pp. 63-85.
    In this paper I examine parallels between C.S. Peirce's most mature account of signs and contemporary philosophy of language. I do this by first introducing a summary of Peirce's final account of Signs. I then use that account of signs to reconstruct Peircian answers to two puzzles of reference: The Problem of Cognitive Significance, or Frege's Puzzle; and The Same-Saying Phenomenon for Indexicals. Finally, a comparison of these Peircian answers with both Fregean and Direct Referentialist approaches to (...)
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  44.  96
    The Complementarity of a Representational and an Epistemological Function of Signs in Scientific Activity.Michael H. G. Hoffmann & Wolff-Michael Roth - 2007 - Semiotica 2007 (164):101-121.
    Signs do not only “represent” something for somebody, as Peirce’s definition goes, but also “mediate” relations between us and our world, including ourselves, as has been elaborated by Vygotsky. We call the first the representational function of a sign and the second the epistemological function since in using signs we make distinctions, specify objects and relations, structure our observations, and organize societal and cognitive activity. The goal of this paper is, on the one hand, to develop a model (...)
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  45.  34
    Models as Icons: Modeling Models in the Semiotic Framework of Peirce's Theory of Signs.Björn Kralemann & Claas Lattmann - 2013 - Synthese 190 (16):3397-3420.
    In this paper, we try to shed light on the ontological puzzle pertaining to models and to contribute to a better understanding of what models are. Our suggestion is that models should be regarded as a specific kind of signs according to the sign theory put forward by Charles S. Peirce, and, more precisely, as icons, i.e. as signs which are characterized by a similarity relation between sign (model) and object (original). We argue for this (1) by analyzing (...)
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  46.  26
    Husserl’s Early Semiotics and Number Signs: Philosophy of Arithmetic Through the Lens of “On the Logic of Signs ”.Thomas Byrne - 2017 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 48 (4):287-303.
    This paper demonstrates that Edmund Husserl’s frequently overlooked 1890 manuscript, “On the Logic of Signs,” when closely investigated, reveals itself to be the hermeneutical touchstone for his seminal 1891 Philosophy of Arithmetic. As the former comprises Husserl’s earliest attempt to account for all of the different kinds of signitive experience, his conclusions there can be directly applied to the latter, which is focused on one particular type of sign; namely, number signs. Husserl’s 1890 descriptions of motivating and replacing (...)
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  47.  22
    Charles S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs: Essays in Comparative Semiotics.Gerard Deledalle - 2000 - Indiana University Press.
    [Note: Picture of Peirce available] Charles S. Peirce’s Philosophy of Signs Essays in Comparative Semiotics Gérard Deledalle Peirce’s semiotics and metaphysics compared to the thought of other leading philosophers. "This is essential reading for anyone who wants to find common ground between the best of American semiotics and better-known European theories. Deledalle has done more than anyone else to introduce Peirce to European audiences, and now he sends Peirce home with some new flare."—Nathan Houser, Director, Peirce Edition Project Charles (...)
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  48. Persons, Signs, Animals: A Peircean Account of Personhood.Robert Lane - 2009 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):pp. 1-26.
    In this essay I describe two of the accounts that Peirce provides of personhood: the semiotic account, on which a person is a sequence of thought-signs, and the naturalistic account, on which a person is an animal. I then argue that these disparate accounts can be reconciled into a plausible view on which persons are numerically distinct entities that are nevertheless continuous with each other in an important way. This view would be agreeable to Peirce in some respects, as (...)
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  49.  46
    Signs, Social Ontology, and Critical Realism.Tobin Nellhaus - 1998 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 28 (1):1–24.
    Even though sign-systems are a crucial part of society, critical realism, as developed by Roy Bhaskar, does not yet have an adequate theory of signs and semiosis. The few suggestions that Bhaskar offers can be advanced through the semiotics of C.S. Peirce. In doing so, however, it becomes necessary to reconsider Bhaskar's ontological domains of the real, the actual, and the subjective, and expand the last domain into one of semiosis. This new understanding of ontological domains, incorporating Peirceian semiotics, (...)
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  50.  9
    The Growth of Signs.Winfried Noth - 2014 - Sign Systems Studies 42 (2-3):172.
    The paper discusses the theory of semiosis in the context of Peirce’s philosophy of evolution. Focussing on the thesis that symbols grow by incorporating indices and icons, it proposes answers to the following questions: What does Peirce mean by the “self-development of signs” in nature and culture and by symbols as livingthings? How do signs grow? Do all signs grow, or do only symbols grow? Does the growth of signs presuppose semiotic agency, and if so, who (...)
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